aluisio
aluisio
Joined: Sep 15, 2010
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November 18th, 2010 at 2:55:53 PM permalink
First of all I would like to thank for your patience with my newbie questions. I have been playing Texas Hold'em for a while at internet and I am completely used to the game rules, that is not the problem. The point is that I have never played the game live and do not know much about how it works in casinos (I mean, cash games.) so that I have tons of doubts.

May I list some questions, letting this topic more dynamic:

1) Is there a min. buy in to join a table?
2) When is it polite to join the game? Can I get in at any hand just by placing the Big Blind?
3) Can I leave the game anytime I want?
4) Are cell phones allowed?
No bounce, no play.
tgarrettcpa
tgarrettcpa
Joined: Apr 18, 2010
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November 18th, 2010 at 3:02:33 PM permalink
1) Usually 40x BB
2) Yes, or you can wait for the BB
3)Yes
4 No (maybe you could get away with a text message every one and while)
Croupier
Croupier
Joined: Nov 15, 2009
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November 18th, 2010 at 4:04:01 PM permalink
1) Is there a min. buy in to join a table?

/there is pretty much always a minimum buyin to join a table. The actual amount can vary from around 20x bb upwards.

2) When is it polite to join the game? Can I get in at any hand just by placing the Big Blind?

You can join a game if there is an open seat, assuming no waiting list. Best thing is to ask the card room supervisor. Once you have sat down you post a bb to join, or can wait till the big blind reaches you.

3) Can I leave the game anytime I want?

You can, but it is considered good etiquette to give three hands notice by telling the dealer "last 3". It is up to you if you want to play the hands or fold them without looking, but it reflects better on you as at least the other players think you are giving them a chance to win their money back.

4) Are cell phones allowed?

This also depends from room to room, some are still strictly no phones, some will allow phones for short converations and penalise you if you are not attempting to end the call in a timely fashion. Again best to check with the card room supervisor.
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toastcmu
toastcmu
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
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November 18th, 2010 at 4:19:18 PM permalink
Quote: aluisio

1) Is there a min. buy in to join a table?
2) When is it polite to join the game? Can I get in at any hand just by placing the Big Blind?



As an example at Hollywood Casino @ Charles Town - the 1/2 NL games offer a $60 minimum and $300 max buy in. The amount you can buy in is up to you.

#2 - Charles Town charges a time rake ($6 every 30 minutes / dealer change), versus many casinos charge a rake on the pot to the winning player. If the casino you are playing at has a time rake, there is no reason not to post the BB and start playing as soon as you sit down. Many times, in casinos with pot rakes, people tend to wait until the BB comes to them before they start playing. Again, this is personal preference.

-B
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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November 18th, 2010 at 5:17:43 PM permalink
In addition to the sound advice from the other posters, please take time to review the cardroom's rules. They could be posted on their website, but are certainly available on a handout or on a poster in the room. Take time to lurk before sitting down. Watch the flow of the game from a discreet distance. Observe how the players are protecting their cards, announcing raises, preparing their blinds, organizing their chips, and tipping. There are alot of differences playing live vs. online.

Which reminds me, that in a live game, some rooms require you to purchase chips from a central table, while others have runners. All tables will allow you to rebuy at the table for at least the minimum buy-in, (and sometimes, for less than the minimum if your last re-buy was a full one).

Have fun! and trust the heart of the cards.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
jpprovance
jpprovance
Joined: Jan 27, 2010
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November 18th, 2010 at 5:31:01 PM permalink
observations of mine:
in vegas the smallest nlh game is usually 1-2 or 1-3blinds with a 100-300 or 100-500 buyin
for low limit in vegas go to luxor or bills. they have lower limit games.
nobody ever announces when they are leaving. people will double up and bail.
all casinos in lv or los angeles have chip runners.
new players apologize too much. if you do something and the dealer corrects. like fold out of turn. its not a big deal. just pretend you were drunk. dont apologize a million times. you are giving away that you are a newb.
jpprovance
jpprovance
Joined: Jan 27, 2010
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November 18th, 2010 at 5:33:03 PM permalink
also look up how no flop no drop rules work(preflop chopping). and dont show your losing hand. if you dont know how to read your hand and are not sure if its good or not. study the game more.
mkl654321
mkl654321
Joined: Aug 8, 2010
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November 18th, 2010 at 5:42:17 PM permalink
Quote: aluisio

1) Is there a min. buy in to join a table?
2) When is it polite to join the game? Can I get in at any hand just by placing the Big Blind?
3) Can I leave the game anytime I want?
4) Are cell phones allowed?



I just wanted to elaborate on some of the answers given:

1) If a limit game, 10 small blids is usually the minimum buyin, but some casinos would require 10 BIG blinds. In no-limit, the very smallest buyins for 1-2 NL would be in the $40-60 range, and many cardrooms require a $100 minimum. You will almost certainly see a $100 minimum buyin in 1-3, and $200 or more in 2-5.
2) Simply sit down at the table that the floorman directs you to. If there is more than one seat open, you may choose whichever seat you want, but if there is a single chip in front of that seat, it means that someone at the table wants to move there, so the seat that is actually open is the one that player will be vacating. When you sit down, the dealer will ask you, "Do you want a hand?" This is asking if you wish to be dealt in immediately. It is NOT necessarily true that you have to be dealt in on the big blind; some cardrooms will deal you in right away, without the obligation to wait. There is one more caution: some cardrooms allow you to come in immediately ONLY if you post the big blind right away, out of position. If you do this, you will have to post the "regular" big blind a few hands later as well. When in doubt, ask the dealer if you have to "post" before being dealt in.
3) You can leave the game at any time, and there is NO stigma attached to leaving abruptly or without notice to the dealer or other players. You want to leave, you leave.
4) Some cardrooms allow them, but most don't. I would recommend that even if they ARE allowed, you keep yours turned off and safely in your pocket. The last thing you need is a distraction when you're trying to make a decision that could be worth a hundred dollars (or more).
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw
aluisio
aluisio
Joined: Sep 15, 2010
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November 19th, 2010 at 4:23:17 AM permalink
Hey, guys! Thanks a lot for all the responses, you are very gentle.
I guess that for now I have no more doubts, however I still feel a little unsecure. Every information posted here helped a lot. Now I rely on luck and skill, haha.
No bounce, no play.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear 
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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November 19th, 2010 at 5:39:23 AM permalink
What others have said, plus:

1A - Once seated, there is never a requirement to re-buy. I.E. If you lose, and only have $2 left, you can still play, and go all-in for $2. It's kinda stupid to not re-buy, but no requirement. If you are below the table minimum, when you decide to re-buy, you must get to the minimum.

1B - Once you win someone else's money, they deserve a shot at winning it back. Therefore, you are never allowed to take chips off the table unless you are leaving. Minor exceptions are to tip the waitress, pay for food if the room has a food waitress, and pay for an at-table massage. (Not all rooms have a food waitress. Those that don't usually don't allow eating at the table at all.)

2A - Don't just sit down. Go to the room manager and specify the type of game you want. Often there is a wait list. If there is no wait, they will seat you at the table that has the most open seats.

2B - Most, but not all, casinos require you to post the big blind for your first hand. You have the option of waiting until you're the BB. If the casino doesn't require posting, the dealer will deal you in on the next hand. There are exceptions such as if you take the seat of a player who busted out when he would have been small blind or the button.

3A - Leave any time you damn well please. Sure, it's polite to announce it beforehand, but if you win a pot and want to get out of there, DO IT!

3B - If you need to take a break (bathroom, etc.) you must leave your chips on the table. The max time away from the table varies. Some allow as much as 90 minutes. If you've been gone long enough to miss the blinds, when you return, you WILL be required to post, or wait for the BB.

4A - Like regular casino games, if you need to use the phone, step away from the table. Don't even use it if you're not in a hand. In the unlikely case of a Bad Beat, most casinos will reject it if any player was on the phone, or texting, while at the table. Some casinos will even reject it if a phone was simply sitting on the table.

4B - Most casinos will allow you to answer the phone - but do it right. Answer it without looking at it, and just say "Hang on a minute" or "I'm in a hand" then put it on your lap where you can't see it, and without giving the caller a chance to say anything. When you're out of the hand, step away to talk.


Additional hints:

ALWAYS announce "raise" if that's your intention, but not obvious. You could have a mountain of white chips, and one green chip. If it's $2 to call, and you throw in that single green chip without saying anything, that's a call, not a raise. However, if you throw in multiple chips, enough to be a valid raise, then it's a raise.

If you throw in multiple chips, more than a call but less than a raise, ask what the rule is. Some will say that ANYTHING less than a full raise is just a call and return the excess. Some will say that if it was at least half a raise, then it's a raise, and you must add more chips to make it a full raise.

String bets are not allowed. I.E. You see it all the time on TV shows (not poker shows) and in movies. The player says "I see your bet... and raise you $x" One he says "I see your bet" that's a call. Similarly, if you put out chips, you can't reach for more.

"One man on a hand." You can't show your cards to anyone and ask for advice.

Try to avoid poker questions that would mark you as a novice, but don't be afraid to ask casino rules questions, since these can be different at different locations. I.E. Are straddles allowed? How long can I go on break? Is it a live betting line?

In some casinos, you can grab a stack of chips, drop a couple, and that's the bet. If they have a live betting line, whatever is in your hand that crosses the line, is the bet.

In some casinos, if you're heads-up, you can show your hand. Some casinos will not allow it and declare the hand dead.



Hope that helps.
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁 Note that the same could be said for Religion. I.E. Religion is nothing more than organized superstition. 🤗

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