Wizard
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Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
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November 19th, 2020 at 9:29:18 PM permalink
Question -- A description of the series I read said that Beth's superior chess ability was a result of tranquilizers. Personally, I didn't come away with that interpretation watching the show. I don't deny it, but don't necessarily agree either. Does the book address this in greater depth? Opinions?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Gialmere
Gialmere
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November 19th, 2020 at 10:01:31 PM permalink
I think the idea is that the tranquilizers allowed her to hallucinate the chessboard on the ceiling (the source of her analytical brilliance). Later in life, when she finally gets sober, she loses the ability.

Then, at the Moscow match, she stares at the ceiling (to everyone else's confusion) and the chessboard reappears suggesting she had the ability all along and the drugs were merely a mental crutch.
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
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November 20th, 2020 at 7:25:22 AM permalink
Quote: Dalex64

Late in the series, the some of the chess boards had numbers and letters on the edges, as the players were shifting from descriptive to algebraic notation.

"Pawn to King 4" becomes "e4"


Pedantic Alert: Black's P-K4 is "e5".
I don't know when algebraic notation became "universal," but Raymond Keene's 1978 book on the first Karpov-Korchnoi match used descriptive and his 1985 book on the second one used algebraic.

Speaking of pedantic, if you look closely at the floor of the gym where the Kentucky State Championship is being held in episode 2, you'll notice that not only is there a 3-point circle, which didn't exist in the 1950s, but both it and the free throw lane are the current (well "current" as in "as of 2011") international versions, so obviously that scene wasn't filmed in the USA.
DRich
DRich
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November 20th, 2020 at 8:29:57 AM permalink
Quote: ThatDonGuy

Not quite "early" 1970s; I read about it in Popular Electronics when I was in middle school, so around 1975. The first computer I programmed was a big iron IBM 1130; the first one I owned was an Atari 800 (with a whopping 48 KB of RAM) in the early 1980s.



I started on the IBM 360 with punch cards. The first game I wrote was a checkers game on it where every move required punching a card with the coordinates and a new board would be printed on the line printer for every move. I believe I wrote that one in COBOL but it may have been Fortran 66.
Living longer does not always infer +EV
Greasyjohn
Greasyjohn
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November 20th, 2020 at 11:00:37 AM permalink
Iíve heard a lot about Queens Gambit. Iíll have to see it. I play chess on Lichess.org under the handle Greasyjohn where Iíve played over 14,000 games in the last 4 years.

I thought I might have played Mike a while back. The handle was WizardsChess64. I ask if he was Mike but got no reply. Wizard was born in Ď65, but still, what a considence.

I always play queenís gambit declined as black. And I always open with e4 when white.

Anyone heard of the Fried Liver?
EdCollins
EdCollins
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November 20th, 2020 at 11:31:20 AM permalink
Quote: Greasyjohn

...Anyone heard of the Fried Liver?

Sure. I believe the Fried Liver Attack is:

1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bc4 Nf6
4. Ng5

And White sacrifices his bishop on f7.
Greasyjohn
Greasyjohn
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November 20th, 2020 at 11:43:49 AM permalink
Fried Liver attack:
1. e4 e5
2. nf3 nc6
3. bc4 nf6
4. ng5 pd4
5. pxp nxp... then
6. nxf7.

How about the Reti chess puzzle from 1921. The most famous chess puzzle of all time.
Last edited by: Greasyjohn on Nov 20, 2020
DRich
DRich
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November 20th, 2020 at 12:07:42 PM permalink
Would this show be interesting for someone like myself that doesn't know or play chess?
Living longer does not always infer +EV
EdCollins
EdCollins
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November 20th, 2020 at 12:18:10 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

Would this show be interesting for someone like myself that doesn't know or play chess?

My neighbor Lori said she binge-watched it the first day it premiered. She loved it... and she's never played a game of chess in her life. Someone else I talked to also doesn't play chess (let alone play in tournaments), and they enjoyed it very much too. So the answer is, yes, it's very possible you will enjoy it anyway.
unJon
unJon
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November 20th, 2020 at 12:22:31 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

Would this show be interesting for someone like myself that doesn't know or play chess?



Yes. Itís a great show.
The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong; but that is the way to bet.

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