Tree
Tree
Joined: Nov 25, 2014
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December 13th, 2018 at 9:12:37 AM permalink
Hi everyone,

I wasn't sure where to post this. My apologies if this is the wrong place, please let me know/feel free to move it.

I do a lot of gambling and tend to make good money doing it, and I would like to brush up on my math knowledge as I feel like it is beginning to hold me back. I studied quantitative degrees so I'm familiar with most of the topics I want to learn but I would like to refresh my knowledge. The topics I think are useful would be:

- Linear algebra
- Calculus
- Prob & stats
- Discrete math

Most of the textbooks I've seen for these topics tend to be either very basic, or proof-based, whereas I'm looking for an intermediate-advanced applied book. I would much appreciate if anybody could recommend some textbooks on these topics that teaches them from an applied point of view, with lots of problems, and covers the right content for a gambler.
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
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December 13th, 2018 at 9:24:31 AM permalink
"Theory of Gambling and Statistical Logic"

Richard Epstein
"but I don't care too much for money..........money can't buy me love".............. the Beatles
Tree
Tree
Joined: Nov 25, 2014
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December 13th, 2018 at 9:54:00 AM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

"Theory of Gambling and Statistical Logic"

Richard Epstein



I own that one actually, and went through about 50-100 pages of it before deciding that I should brush up on my math first before going back to it. Which led to this topic..
DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
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December 13th, 2018 at 11:28:48 AM permalink
Brushing up on probability and statistics would be your best bet for gaming math.
Living longer does not always infer +EV
FCBLComish
FCBLComish
Joined: Apr 11, 2010
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Tree
December 13th, 2018 at 12:46:20 PM permalink
Does this help?

https://www.unr.edu/Documents/business/gaming/practicalcasinomath.pdf
Beware, I work for the dark side.... We have cookies
smoothgrh
smoothgrh
Joined: Oct 26, 2011
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December 13th, 2018 at 9:47:13 PM permalink
Quote: FCBLComish

Does this help?

https://www.unr.edu/Documents/business/gaming/practicalcasinomath.pdf



$88 on Amazon!
RS
RS
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Tree
December 13th, 2018 at 11:44:18 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

Brushing up on probability and statistics would be your best bet for gaming math.


^ This.

I'm no "pro" at doing gambling math stuff like some others are, but I do by just fine most of the time. Most of figuring stuff out is just probability and statistics. Don't think I've ever used calculus, linear algebra, or anything else really when doing gambling math stuff. That isn't to say it isn't useful to know about the stuff in those subjects, because the more subjects you've studied, the easier it is to look at a problem and find a solution, since you can look at it from many different angles.


Also, depending on the type of stuff you want to calculate, you can also be more important to learn programming, although you should probably know math too, since they go hand-in-hand frequently.


Edit: Are you the same tree on Ryemo's discord?
charliepatrick
charliepatrick
Joined: Jun 17, 2011
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Treetringlomane
December 14th, 2018 at 10:09:18 AM permalink
As had been said I haven't used calculus or integrals for gambling analysis. More useful is a thorough knowledge of probabilities and an understanding of statistics. Most of the rest you learn on the job or while trying to find out how to work out certain problems. I did find some interesting stuff when developing my simulations (mersenne primes, RNGs, confidence testing). The stuff I haven't yet tackled is analysing blackjack for finite decks or complicated poker games - e.g. some people talk of using bit analysis to quickly evaluate poker hands. I am assuming you are confident in writing computer programs.
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
Joined: Jun 22, 2011
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Tree
December 14th, 2018 at 10:17:57 AM permalink
Quote: Tree

- Linear algebra
- Calculus
- Prob & stats
- Discrete math


Throw in some basic computing courses, and Matrix Algebra, and you've pretty much described what I had to take in my first two years to get into the Computer Science program at Cal.

Basic probability is probably the best place to start. Keep in mind that things like the Risk of Ruin formula are far from "basic."

Wolfram Mathworld is your friend.
Tree
Tree
Joined: Nov 25, 2014
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December 14th, 2018 at 12:03:26 PM permalink
Quote: RS

^ This.

I'm no "pro" at doing gambling math stuff like some others are, but I do by just fine most of the time. Most of figuring stuff out is just probability and statistics. Don't think I've ever used calculus, linear algebra, or anything else really when doing gambling math stuff. That isn't to say it isn't useful to know about the stuff in those subjects, because the more subjects you've studied, the easier it is to look at a problem and find a solution, since you can look at it from many different angles.


Also, depending on the type of stuff you want to calculate, you can also be more important to learn programming, although you should probably know math too, since they go hand-in-hand frequently.


Edit: Are you the same tree on Ryemo's discord?



Thanks for the response. Yes I am the same Tree from the discord. I guess Calculus is a bit of a stretch but I had thought that some of the trickier analyses would have required linear algebra. And discrete mathematics is very directly relevant, at it's core it's the study of counting things and a lot of the problems in DM textbooks are casino game examples. Maybe I should just invest all of my time into learning Prob/Stats/DM.

I agree that programming is more important. I program quite a bit for my AP as it is. I do want to improve that a lot too but wanted to start with math as it feels more 'fundamental'.

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