Thread Rating:

Poll

16 votes (51.61%)
12 votes (38.7%)
5 votes (16.12%)
2 votes (6.45%)
9 votes (29.03%)
3 votes (9.67%)
5 votes (16.12%)
5 votes (16.12%)
10 votes (32.25%)
7 votes (22.58%)

31 members have voted

unJon
unJon
Joined: Jul 1, 2018
  • Threads: 14
  • Posts: 2696
March 1st, 2021 at 1:28:17 PM permalink
Quote: teliot

Okay, which leads me to a cute little theorem-ette that is on the slightly non-trivial side (but not that non-trivial), related to the 153 question.

Let N > 0 be any integer. Let S be the sum of the cubes of its digits. Show that the difference (N-S) is always divisible by 3.

For example, N = 1263. S = 1^3 + 2^3 + 6^3 + 3^3 = 1 + 8 + 216 + 27 = 252. N - S = 1011= 3*337.



This is definitely true for every number through 9,999, which I just did in Excel. And late to party but also agree with Charlie results.
The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong; but that is the way to bet.
teliot
teliot
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
  • Threads: 39
  • Posts: 2210
March 1st, 2021 at 3:35:31 PM permalink
Quote: charliepatrick

We can split any number into its constituent digits and consider each one in turn. So a number such as 543 look at the difference between 500 and 53, 40 and 43, 3 and 33. If each of these is divisible by 3, then the total will.

So the approach is to show it for one digit numbers, then two digit numbers, etc.

Consider 0<N<10. N3-N = N * (N2-1) = N * (N-1) * (N+1). One these must be a multiple of 3.

Now consider a number <100 which is 10M+N. Then we would like M3-10M to be a multiple of 3. This is the same as (M3-M)-9*M. The former (M3-M) is divisible by 3 (as per above) and 9*M is also divisible by 3. Hence the difference is divisible by 3. This proves the case for two digit numbers.

Similar logic will apply to any other digit in the number since it will split into (L3-L)-999....999*L.

Hence it applies to all integers.

Hmmm .... not sure I like the "similar logic will apply" part. Can you formalize that?
Poetry website: www.totallydisconnected.com
Gialmere
Gialmere
Joined: Nov 26, 2018
  • Threads: 41
  • Posts: 1973
March 1st, 2021 at 5:43:42 PM permalink
Quote: unJon

Did it quick in my head but looks like:

153


Quote: teliot

153 -- which, coincidentally, is the smallest integer > 1 that is the sum of the cubes of its digits. 153 = 1^3 + 5^3 + 3^3. There are three more positive integers > 1 with this property. Bonus easy Monday question -- What are they?

Bonus bonus question -- how many fish did Simon Peter catch (New Testament)?


Quote: ThatDonGuy


By 891, one of 1, 8, 9 is in the code, but by 849, neither 8 nor 9 are in the code, so 1 is in the code, but not the third digit
By 317, 1 is not the second digit; therefore, 1 is the first digit
By 793, either 9 is the second digit or 3 is the third digit, but by 849, 9 is not in the code, so 3 is the third digit
By 725, either 7 or 5 is the second digit, but by 793, since 3 is in the code, 7 is not, so 5 is the second digit
The code is 153


Correct!
------------------------------

Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
Gialmere
Gialmere
Joined: Nov 26, 2018
  • Threads: 41
  • Posts: 1973
Thanks for this post from:
unJon
March 1st, 2021 at 10:59:50 PM permalink
Quote: unJon

Did it quick in my head but looks like:

153


P.S. This 89 second solve shatters the old speed record!
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
charliepatrick
charliepatrick
Joined: Jun 17, 2011
  • Threads: 33
  • Posts: 2400
March 2nd, 2021 at 2:08:47 AM permalink
Quote: teliot

...Hmmm .... not sure I like the "similar logic will apply" part. Can you formalize that?

Earlier the proof was given for (X-X3) would be a multiple of 3. Now to show it applies to all larger integers.

Every integer (ABC....Z) can be considered A*10n+B*10(n-1)...Z. The sum of the integer cubes is A3+B3+...+Z3.

Consider the A part. The difference = A*10n-A3 = A*(10n-1)+A-A3. The first part, being 999....999 is divisible by 3. The second part, by previous proof, is divisible by 3.

Hence A*10n-A3 is divisible by 3.

Since this would apply to all the other digits in any number (B,C, .... Z); the condition is true for all integers.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1383
  • Posts: 23123
March 2nd, 2021 at 3:57:10 AM permalink


Four congruent semicircles are arranged in a square. The radius of each circle is 1, what is the length of a side of the square?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
ChesterDog
ChesterDog 
Joined: Jul 26, 2010
  • Threads: 7
  • Posts: 958
March 2nd, 2021 at 5:47:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard



Four congruent semicircles are arranged in a square. The radius of each circle is 1, what is the length of a side of the square?




Call the centers of the topmost and rightmost circles O and P, respectively. And let point A be the upper right corner of the square.

Line segment OP is the hypotenuse of triangle OAP. OP = 2 and AP = 1. Therefore, OA = (22-12)1/2 = 31/2.

Add 1 to the above length to get the side of the square: 31/2 + 1
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1383
  • Posts: 23123
March 2nd, 2021 at 6:18:55 AM permalink
Quote: ChesterDog




Call the centers of the topmost and rightmost circles O and P, respectively. And let point A be the upper right corner of the square.

Line segment OP is the hypotenuse of triangle OAP. OP = 2 and AP = 1. Therefore, OA = (22-12)1/2 = 31/2.

Add 1 to the above length to get the side of the square: 31/2 + 1



Winner, winner, chicken dinner!
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
teliot
teliot
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
  • Threads: 39
  • Posts: 2210
March 2nd, 2021 at 6:18:59 AM permalink
Quote: charliepatrick

Earlier the proof was given for (X-X3) would be a multiple of 3. Now to show it applies to all larger integers.

Every integer (ABC....Z) can be considered A*10n+B*10(n-1)...Z. The sum of the integer cubes is A3+B3+...+Z3.

Consider the A part. The difference = A*10n-A3 = A*(10n-1)+A-A3. The first part, being 999....999 is divisible by 3. The second part, by previous proof, is divisible by 3.

Hence A*10n-A3 is divisible by 3.

Since this would apply to all the other digits in any number (B,C, .... Z); the condition is true for all integers.


This appears to be an induction proof on the number of digits in the number. I'm still shaky on its logic, maybe just getting too old to make sense of things.

Here is my proof:



Poetry website: www.totallydisconnected.com
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
Joined: Jun 22, 2011
  • Threads: 101
  • Posts: 4841
March 2nd, 2021 at 7:04:44 AM permalink
Quote: teliot

Okay, which leads me to a cute little theorem-ette that is on the slightly non-trivial side (but not that non-trivial), related to the 153 question.

Let N > 0 be any integer. Let S be the sum of the cubes of its digits. Show that the difference (N-S) is always divisible by 3.

For example, N = 1263. S = 1^3 + 2^3 + 6^3 + 3^3 = 1 + 8 + 216 + 27 = 252. N - S = 1011= 3*337.



I have a feeling I am repeating at least one earlier answer...


Let {a0, a1, a2, ...} be a set of integers in {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9} such that N = a0 + 10 a1 + 100 a2 + ... + 10k ak + ...

Since 10k - 1 = 9 (1 + 10 + 100 + ... + 10k-1), N = 3 (3 + 30 + ... +3 x 10k-1) + a0 + a1 + a2 + ..., this means that the difference between N and the sum of the cubes of its digits = a multiple of 3 + the sum of (each digit and the cube of that digit).
As has been pointed out earlier in the thread, for any digit K, K3 - K = K (K2 - 1) = (K-1) K (K+1);
since one of those must be a multiple of 3, K3 - K is always a multiple of 3, so the difference between N and the sum of the cubes of its digits is the sum of multiples of 3.


  • Jump to: