Poll

19 votes (86.36%)
3 votes (13.63%)

22 members have voted

Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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March 15th, 2012 at 5:58:41 PM permalink
Felix Baumgartner plans to ascend to 120,000 feet above Roswell, New Mexico in a helium balloon, then freefall 120,000 feet to set a new world record.

Check out the website (sponsored by Red Bull) here.

My beef with this "record", is that at that altitude a pressurized suit and oxygen system are required to keep him alive. I posit that the suit functions as a small, "space capsule", providing a suitable environment for the human inside. Therefore the real record has to be held by the Apollo 13 astronauts whose, "freefall" could be measured from the far side of the Moon.

I don't think this is such a great feat given the use of a spacesuit. Just about anyone in good physical condition could do it. What do you think? Should his attempt from 120,000 ft. (assuming it is successful) be the record?
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WongBo
WongBo
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March 15th, 2012 at 7:38:25 PM permalink
The astronauts were also in a capsule.
This guy is just in a suit.
I vote that he deserves the record..
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Scotty71
Scotty71
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March 15th, 2012 at 7:49:58 PM permalink
Sounds like a record to me but not as cool as this Crazy Sh!t also courtesy of the folks at Redbull
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Nareed
Nareed
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March 15th, 2012 at 7:55:08 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

Therefore the real record has to be held by the Apollo 13 astronauts whose, "freefall" could be measured from the far side of the Moon.



That required a rocket (if you want to be technical, four rockets) and went beyond the atmosphere.

BTW Why Apollo 13? All Apollo Lunar missions ranged about as far, after all. Why not Apollo 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 or 17?

Quote:

I don't think this is such a great feat given the use of a spacesuit. Just about anyone in good physical condition could do it. What do you think? Should his attempt from 120,000 ft. (assuming it is successful) be the record?



I wouldn't do it. Would you? It won't be the first time, either. The Air Force, or maybe the US Army Air Corps, did a similar feat back in the 50s, I think.
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pacomartin
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March 15th, 2012 at 11:27:41 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

I don't think this is such a great feat given the use of a spacesuit. Just about anyone in good physical condition could do it. What do you think? Should his attempt from 120,000 ft. (assuming it is successful) be the record?



This effort has been going on now for about 5 years. There is a serious question about his survival. It's not a dummy operation that any body could do given the right funding.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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March 16th, 2012 at 5:39:21 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

BTW Why Apollo 13? All Apollo Lunar missions ranged about as far, after all. Why not Apollo 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 or 17?

Because of the explosion, the service module was out of commission, and they had to use a "free return trajectory" to come home. I.E. They sling-shot around the moon, using the moon's gravity to bring them back.

The problem with this assumption is that they were not in free fall all the way from the moon.

At some point on the way back, they used the rocket on the lunar module for course correction.

Additionally, after they jettisoned the service module and lunar module, they were no different than any other Apollo capsule, and could use the command module's control jets for attitude and minor course adjustment.

So, on the basis of THAT criteria, it could have been ANY mission in space to get the award for highest free-fall, and you'd have to check Nasa and Russian records to figure out which one actually gets the nod.
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Nareed
Nareed
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March 16th, 2012 at 7:59:55 AM permalink
Quote: DJTeddyBear

Because of the explosion, the service module was out of commission, and they had to use a "free return trajectory" to come home. I.E. They sling-shot around the moon, using the moon's gravity to bring them back.



Yes, but all Apollo missions orbited the Moon and returned from there. They all saw the "dark" side of the Moon, too, though none landed there.

Quote:

The problem with this assumption is that they were not in free fall all the way from the moon.

At some point on the way back, they used the rocket on the lunar module for course correction.



Well, you're not on free fall when you use a rocket. Then you're under acceleration. But again that applies to all apollo Lunar missions. The typical Apollo profile was to coast to the Moon, get captured into orbit there, with course corrections as required, and using the main engine in the service module to break from Lunar orbit and slow down in order to get back home. Apollo 13 differed in that they couldn't trust the SM engine to work after the oxygen tank there went boom. So instead they used the LEM's engine. But as far as disatnce goes, they all went as far.

Perhaps 13 did go a bit farhter, or the Moon was farther out in its elliptical path during that mission, btu thsoe differences are minimal even in the msall distance between Earth and Moon.

BTW no human being has gone past the Moon. Plenty of space probes have, of course, the ones farther out being the Voyagers and Pionneers X and XI, which are currently just outside the Solar System. All other probes are either orbiting their target planets, or resting on their targets, or have taken orbits around the Sun. Except for those that crashed or blew up, of course.

Oh, and not that it's on topic, quite, but SpaceX (Space Exploration Technologies) turned 10 years old this week. Happy birthday!
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ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
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March 16th, 2012 at 12:18:22 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Yes, but all Apollo missions orbited the Moon and returned from there. They all saw the "dark" side of the Moon, too, though none landed there.


In every case but 13, the command module's rocket was used to get the astronauts out of lunar orbit, so the starting point of the "freefall" would, presumably, be about halfway around the moon between its nearest and farthest points. With Apollo 13, no rocket was used, as they (slingshotted? slungshot?) around the moon in order to head back towards Earth, so the freefall starts from the far side. (I consider "freefall" as being in any direction where the distance between the object and Earth is decreasing.)
Mosca
Mosca
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March 16th, 2012 at 1:11:57 PM permalink
Jeez, I'm surprised no one posted this. The current world record is 102,800 feet... Joseph Kittinger.

And he had a movie camera.


Col Joe Kittinger, world record sky dive
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98Clubs
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March 16th, 2012 at 10:43:49 PM permalink
AFAIK he's been testing at 13-14 miles already (merely 70000 feet).
Some people need to reimagine their thinking.

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