Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1343
  • Posts: 22219
September 2nd, 2020 at 5:21:07 PM permalink
Speaking of looking into the future, I present my next video on how to win in chess with a king, knight and bishop vs. a king.


Direct: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLeYfTbmFzM
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1343
  • Posts: 22219
September 3rd, 2020 at 5:45:58 PM permalink
An upcoming video with Angela will be on the topic of Vegas scams. Here is a list we put together, but we welcome other suggestions and comments if some of these should not be considered a scam.

1. Paid parking
2. Resort fees
3. Reservations.com
4. Concession and franchise fees
5. Charging to use mini-fridge
6. Welcome to Vegas sign photo-people
7. “Free CD” people
8. Street entertainers
9. Gift shop prices
10. Water sellers on strip
11. Timeshare pitches
12. Long-hauling cab drivers
13. Night club promoters
14. Hypnotist / lip-synch shows
15. ATM fees
16. “Hot babes direct to you.”
17. Three card monty.
18. West rim Grand Canyon

Meanwhile, I do recommend Tangerine Travels video on this topic.
Last edited by: Wizard on Sep 4, 2020
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
TinMan
TinMan
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  • Threads: 14
  • Posts: 151
September 3rd, 2020 at 6:12:05 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is a list we put together, but we welcome other suggestions and comments if some of these should not be considered a scam.



I wouldn’t call most of these a scam. Maybe “best to know” or “how to budget for Vegas” but not a scam. To me, I consider something a scam If (1) the price isn’t disclosed until after the service/product is rendered, especially if anything leading up to that point played off of generally held social expectations that there would not be a charge/nominal tip, (2) the service/product wasn’t as promised, (3) there was an implied or explicit threat used to secure an allegedly “voluntary” gratuity/payment or (4) the person providing the service wasn’t as advertised.

As far as something I would add to the list—I believe I saw the “fake monks” in Vegas last time I was there. They’re not monks. They tie “religious brackets” on people that are in reality cheap string and then ask for payment. To me, that violates 1, 4 above and really 2 as well. Not sure what happens if you don’t pay, but possibly 3 too.
If anyone gives you 10,000 to 1 on anything, you take it. If John Mellencamp ever wins an Oscar, I am going to be a very rich dude.
EdCollins
EdCollins
Joined: Oct 21, 2011
  • Threads: 16
  • Posts: 1264
September 3rd, 2020 at 7:02:28 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Speaking of looking into the future, I present my next video on how to win in chess with a king, knight and bishop vs. a king.

As an tournament chess player, having played in more than 80 over-the-board chess tournaments over the past 30 years, this is elementary mate everyone at my level (and a few levels below me) should know.

And yes, unless you've practiced it, figuring out the actual moves would be difficult (at least at my level) over the board, especially if you were short on time.

I agree... it's a great mental exercise, especially if you are just learning it or haven't yet fully mastered how to do it. I myself learned how to do it from the 1953 classic The Complete Chessplayer by Fred Reinfeld.

From ANY given position it can be done in at most, 33 moves. However, if you mess up once or twice, you will be in danger of exceeding the 50 moves limit. (In chess, a player can claim a draw if no capture has been made and no pawn has been moved in the last fifty moves.)

In the video you mentioned you would leave a link as to which site you used to learn the mating technique, and a link to a couple of computer sites that you could play chess against. I might be missing it, but I don't see those links anywhere. (I don't need them, but others might.)

Here's that site where you can practice mating with a bishop and a knight:

https://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-training/bishop-knight-checkmate.php

Yea, when I first mastered the technique (a long time ago) I was proud that I had learned how to do it, and that I could do it effortless, from any position. I was so HOPING I'd have to demonstrate it in an actual game, over the board, at one of my tourneys. Alas, it never came up - I never had to do that.

Thanks for the video.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1343
  • Posts: 22219
September 3rd, 2020 at 7:19:05 PM permalink
Quote: TinMan

I wouldn’t call most of these a scam. Maybe “best to know” or “how to budget for Vegas” but not a scam. To me, I consider something a scam If (1) the price isn’t disclosed until after the service/product is rendered, especially if anything leading up to that point played off of generally held social expectations that there would not be a charge/nominal tip, (2) the service/product wasn’t as promised, (3) there was an implied or explicit threat used to secure an allegedly “voluntary” gratuity/payment or (4) the person providing the service wasn’t as advertised.



That's a good point. I think we'll rephrase it as "Vegas scams and warnings" or something like that.

Quote:

As far as something I would add to the list—I believe I saw the “fake monks” in Vegas last time I was there. They’re not monks. They tie “religious brackets” on people that are in reality cheap string and then ask for payment. To me, that violates 1, 4 above and really 2 as well. Not sure what happens if you don’t pay, but possibly 3 too.



I never saw that one, but at the Los Angeles airport there is some religious group that will give you a gift, probably a piece of candy or something, and swing by 5 minutes later and shake you down for a contribution. When I was in Berlin somebody was collecting donations for a school for the deaf. How can you say no? However, the next day at another tourist site there was a sign specifically warning that it was a scam and to not give them money.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1343
  • Posts: 22219
September 3rd, 2020 at 7:22:23 PM permalink
Quote: EdCollins

In the video you mentioned you would leave a link as to which site you used to learn the mating technique, and a link to a couple of computer sites that you could play chess against. I might be missing it, but I don't see those links anywhere. (I don't need them, but others might.)



Thanks for your comments. I see that you have to click "see more" to see the links. Here they are, including the same one you suggested:

Here are the links promised in the video:
Chessvideos.tv: https://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-tr...
Chess.com: https://www.chess.com/play/computer?m...
GM Huschenbeth video: https://youtu.be/hWwuy-aiK1M
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
TinMan
TinMan
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  • Threads: 14
  • Posts: 151
Thanks for this post from:
Mosca
September 3rd, 2020 at 7:33:45 PM permalink
My general rule in Vegas is 99% of the time, if someone is talking to me it’s because they either have received money from me or they hope to receive money from me. That’s not always illegal or wrong by any means (the waiter being pleasant hopes to get a tip—nothing wrong with that).

The religious angle is one that probably gets a lot of people. Many people are religious and it preys (ha!) on that instinct even if it’s not their religion necessarily.

I walk past anyone randomly standing around collecting money for any cause. NYC is filled with people with clipboards for allegedly some cause or another. I keep going. I give to charity through established organizations.
If anyone gives you 10,000 to 1 on anything, you take it. If John Mellencamp ever wins an Oscar, I am going to be a very rich dude.
EdCollins
EdCollins
Joined: Oct 21, 2011
  • Threads: 16
  • Posts: 1264
September 3rd, 2020 at 8:08:10 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I see that you have to click "see more" to see the links.

Ah, the links are on YouTube. Ok, thanks. (I didn't watch the video on YouTube. I just watched it right here without leaving this site. I was looking for the links here.)
Gialmere
Gialmere
Joined: Nov 26, 2018
  • Threads: 38
  • Posts: 1697
September 3rd, 2020 at 8:34:38 PM permalink
Quote: EdCollins

Yea, when I first mastered the technique (a long time ago) I was proud that I had learned how to do it, and that I could do it effortless, from any position. I was so HOPING I'd have to demonstrate it in an actual game, over the board, at one of my tourneys. Alas, it never came up - I never had to do that.


It's rare but it does happen. Unfortunately, at your level of play, if you ever do end up in this situation your opponent will immediately resign, correctly assuming that you can mate with ease. Why waste time?

Still, it's a mandatory lesson for intermediate players who are starting to get serious about the game. At the very least it teaches piece interaction.
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1343
  • Posts: 22219
September 3rd, 2020 at 9:08:22 PM permalink
Quote: Gialmere

Still, it's a mandatory lesson for intermediate players who are starting to get serious about the game. At the very least it teaches piece interaction.



I agree 100%. It's easy to slip past a bishop or knight individually. It takes care and patience to get them to work at as a team, for lack of better terminology.

I find the end game, which I rarely get to, the most interesting and challenging. For that reason, this exercise was a very good challenge for me.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: