Poll

10 votes (34.48%)
19 votes (65.51%)

29 members have voted

MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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July 1st, 2012 at 2:27:41 AM permalink
Yay or nay?
"What, me worry?"
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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July 1st, 2012 at 3:15:03 AM permalink
The old don't fear death, they welcome it.
rainman
rainman
Joined: Mar 28, 2012
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July 1st, 2012 at 3:36:14 AM permalink
When you are far from death you fear it. When you are close to death you do not, you accept it.
Paigowdan
Paigowdan
Joined: Apr 28, 2010
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July 1st, 2012 at 3:53:11 AM permalink
Quote: rainman

When you are far from death you fear it. When you are close to death you do not, you accept it.



No. I fear failure. If I drop dead tomorrow, I've already lived a full life at 51.
Death I accept. If life were indeed fair, really fair, I should already have been dead by now.
Death is so utterly normal and actually routine that no one even escapes it, it is THAT normal to undergo. Like breathing, eating and sleeping, it is a mandatory process we must do and undergo, whether we like it or not. So if it is not liked, at least it is an utterly normal process of life. That's the first thing.
Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes - Henry David Thoreau. Like Dealers' uniforms - Dan.
P90
P90
Joined: Jan 8, 2011
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July 1st, 2012 at 4:11:55 AM permalink
Obviously I do. If I didn't, I would be doing something fun right now, like plinking down Iraqis, rather than posting in a forum that isn't even about plinking down Iraqis.


Every fear people have is a fear of death. Heights, drowning, confinement, pain, even rejection by tribemates, it's all fear of circumstances that can lead to death. Not fearing the abstract of death only indicates not processing death as an abstract.

Is the real question "do you like to pretend you don't fear death"? In that case, the answer is "sometimes".

BTW my experience has been that the older someone is, the more pronounced their fear of death tends to be. It reaches comical sometimes. Then again the American cultural tradition to keep people that have met their natural end on animated corpse support for as long as possible is anything but comical.
Resist ANFO Boston PRISM Stormfront IRA Freedom CIA Obama
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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July 1st, 2012 at 5:01:30 AM permalink
If death wakes me up in middle of the night in the form of a roaring grizzly bear, I'm going to have a moment.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
weaselman
weaselman
Joined: Jul 11, 2010
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July 1st, 2012 at 5:34:48 AM permalink
Quote: P90

Obviously I do. If I didn't, I would be doing something fun right now, like plinking down Iraqis, rather than posting in a forum that isn't even about plinking down Iraqis.


It is not the same thing to not want to do something (or for something to be done to you), and to be afraid of it. I am not afraid of moving to Montana, but I don't want to move there. Likewise, I don't want to die, and will try to avoid it if I can, but I am not afraid of it.


Quote:

Every fear people have is a fear of death. Heights, drowning, confinement, pain, even rejection by tribemates, it's all fear of circumstances that can lead to death.


How about fear of mice, frogs, spiders and the number 13?

Quote:

Not fearing the abstract of death only indicates not processing death as an abstract.


Not an abstract. I think it is just not scary to die, that's all. It could be painful (I don't like pain, and I would be afraid of that piece), or too unexpected (would be embarrassing if death gets to you with your pants down sitting on a toilet, so that might be a little bit scary).

But dying in itself, as "ceasing to exist" isn't scary, and I don't see it can be, unless you subconsciously expect that there is something out there, on the other side, and fear that it might turn out to be not a pleasant place.
"When two people always agree one of them is unnecessary"
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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July 1st, 2012 at 5:40:20 AM permalink
Its a moot question. Its easy not to be afraid of something
thats not staring you in the face. I'm afraid of heights, yet
sitting here in my office, not being on the edge of the Grand
Canyon, I'm not afraid at all.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
P90
P90
Joined: Jan 8, 2011
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July 1st, 2012 at 6:00:37 AM permalink
Quote: weaselman

Likewise, I don't want to die, and will try to avoid it if I can, but I am not afraid of it.


Are you afraid of falling off a cliff? (when standing on the edge of one)
Drowning? (when you are getting water with your breath)
Being cut or stabbed? (when staring down a knife)
Being shot? (when under fire)

When you can cross every reasonably expectable way off the list, you can have a serious claim to really not being afraid of death.

Quote: weaselman

How about fear of mice, frogs, spiders and the number 13?


I actually wanted to add spiders, snakes and mice to my post at first, but decided not to overdo it.
Confinement creates danger of suffocation, spiders and snakes can carry fatal poison, rats are vectors for, at least, bubonic plague.

As for number 13, you could also add gays to the list. Some people might have a phobic fear of it, due to cultural indoctrination, but for the most part it's only conscious superstition without actual fear (as in characteristic amygdala activity).

Quote: weaselman

Not an abstract.
But dying in itself, as "ceasing to exist" isn't scary...


But "ceasing to exist" is pure abstract.

Are people afraid of abstracts? For the most part they aren't. So the question in this context simply comes down to whether you associate this abstract with actually dying and with NDS that you have experienced if any, or if you can only think of it philosophically.
Resist ANFO Boston PRISM Stormfront IRA Freedom CIA Obama
MauiSunset
MauiSunset
Joined: Jun 5, 2012
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July 1st, 2012 at 6:27:40 AM permalink
Organized religions promise an unlimited life after death - they don't supply the fine details on how this works however; just follow what they say and contribute generously and you are guaranteed immortality. I wonder if Wal-Mart has a less expensive version?

If you simply have to die to get unlimited life and virgins then those folks have little fear about death - it's just a speed bump on the highway to immortality and sitting with the gods.

These folks then strap on bombs and fly jets into buildings so they can hurry along to their just reward.

So how do folks believe their 120,000,000,000 neurons get transferred to heaven or hell when they die and where are they stored - in the Matrix? I have a bunch of 2 terabyte USB hard drives that I backup my computers on a regular basis - can I backup my brain too?

Is there an App for that?

I am 100% positive that when my time comes the light switch will be turned from awake to sleep to off and paying off the National Debt will be someone else's problem..........

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