Poll

15 votes (78.94%)
4 votes (21.05%)

19 members have voted

konceptum
konceptum
Joined: Mar 25, 2010
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October 9th, 2011 at 3:16:02 PM permalink
Slightly off-topic, but more irritating to me is the person who insists on pushing the button, after it's clear someone else has pushed the button. Like when you're waiting for an elevator, so you've pushed the Up button, and it's lit up. Then someone else comes along, and pushes the button again. Invariably, the third, fourth, and fifth persons who show up also insist on pushing the button. I always say, "I'm glad you guys showed up. The elevator doesn't start coming until at least 4 people are waiting for it."
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 9th, 2011 at 3:41:36 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

If it pacifies the user then it does something. :P



Perhaps my question was too general. It certainly gives the impatient something to do. I impressed with konceptum for actually trying to do a test. The article that I read said that the button does in fact do something, but only if you have are maintenance and you have a key inserted in the control panel. Otherwise it is simply there as a placebo.

The "open door" button certainly works.

Many "walk" buttons on street corners work, but just as many have been disabled in an attempt to fine tune traffic control with computers. It is expensive to remove the buttons, and it has a placebo effect on the impatient. There is no word if dummy ones are deliberately installed.

Office thermostats are unlikely to give a random person the power to turn a room up to eighty degrees in winter, or down to 60 in summer. The cost could be prohibitive.
Face
Administrator
Face
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October 9th, 2011 at 3:42:39 PM permalink
Quote: konceptum

I always say, "I'm glad you guys showed up. The elevator doesn't start coming until at least 4 people are waiting for it."



Yeah! Stick it to 'em. That bugs me too ;) Even more so is the close door button. As I've said, the one at my place does nothing. Yet the girl I work with, who has been here 5 years longer than I, hammers on it everyday, often lamenting on how it doesn't work. Every Single Day - push - nothing happens - "damn this button, blah, blah, blah" - next day - push - nothing happens - repeat for years.

Something about doing the same thing yet expecting different results.
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Nareed
Nareed
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October 9th, 2011 at 3:55:19 PM permalink
Quote: Johnzimbo

I recently read a fiction novel that took place in Washington DC, and it stated that in many of the elevators in government buildings where muckety-mucks work, the muckety-mucks could get in on the upper floors and, if the page held the "close door" button in, the elevator would not stop at any floor during descent, thus allowing the m-m's to avoid having to share their car with lesser beings.

I wondered if there was any truth to this, or did the author just conjure that idea in his mind?



Urban legend. I've seen people keep the "close door" button, either going up or down, in five different countries (Mexico, USA, Canada, England and Israel). Sometimes the elevator stopped one the way up or down, sometimes not. If it did, then obviously the "system" is just so much hokum. If it didn't, you can't know whether there were any calls for it to stop in the first place.
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Nareed
Nareed
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October 9th, 2011 at 4:07:58 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The article that I read said that the button does in fact do something, but only if you have are maintenance and you have a key inserted in the control panel. Otherwise it is simply there as a placebo.



Have you seen many elevators with key slots in the control panel?

I've seen floors that require a key. In some public buildings with lots of elevator usage, the functions for the lights and the fan may have a key operated switch, too. But I'm not sure I've seen many with a general maintenance key slot.

My info is that the "close door" button does work, but comes out of the factory with a built-in delay. This explains some of my experience, too. In many elevators, perhaps most, pushing the button does make the doors close at once. In some it doesn't. In my office buildings, which has a 70s vintage single-shaft car, the button does work. In my apartment building, the door takes longer to close if you push the button, indicating the built-in delay is longer than the regular closing interval for the door.

I assume the delay can be reprogrammed, but that most people either don't know or don't bother with it.
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SOOPOO
SOOPOO
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October 9th, 2011 at 5:28:52 PM permalink
The correct answer is 'sometimes'. In most elevators in normal use the answer is 'no'. In a hospital, when the 'control key' is used, the answer is 'yes'. By using the control key you also skip past floors that normally you would stop at.
ncfatcat
ncfatcat
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October 9th, 2011 at 5:36:29 PM permalink
Elevator in the office building I work in was installed in 1965. It works. Sometimes a wrong # calls the emergency # in the elevator.8o)
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DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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October 9th, 2011 at 6:19:46 PM permalink
Far too often, it does nothing.

However, it's used when a FireFighter puts his key in and runs the elevator manually.
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kenarman
kenarman
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October 9th, 2011 at 6:43:52 PM permalink
In the majority of elevators I have been in the close door button causes the door to close immediately and not wait for the the timer to expire. On corners without a lot of pedestrian traffice the walk light will not come on if the button is not pushed. On some corners it will cause the lights to change after a short period if the lights for both foot and vehicle are 'on demand' from that direction. These functions can also be time of day dependent. Modern streetlights are microprocessor based and even 'learn' about their own intersection flow patterns when they have traffice sensor installed and adjust schedules to suit the traffic.

Office thermostats can be completely non-functional. It is impossible to make everyone in the office happy anyway, particularly when you have several older ladies that no longer have good control over body temperature anyway.
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kenarman
kenarman
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October 9th, 2011 at 6:55:23 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Have you seen many elevators with key slots in the control panel?

I've seen floors that require a key. In some public buildings with lots of elevator usage, the functions for the lights and the fan may have a key operated switch, too. But I'm not sure I've seen many with a general maintenance key slot.



Elevators for many years usually have 3 key slots on them. 1 for maintenance operation, 1 to test emergency lighting and 1 for fire personnel operation. The lights and fans are usually on any time the elevator is operating now.
Be careful when you follow the masses, the M is sometimes silent.

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