dwheatley
dwheatley
Joined: Nov 16, 2009
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December 21st, 2009 at 12:39:36 PM permalink
I was reading the wizard's review on the Freemont and stumbled across this gem:

"I'm taking a stand against using multi-syllabic words when simple ones will suffice"

My biggest gripe in this category is "utilize". I am pretty convinced that in every possible context, "use" means the same as "utilize". My dad pointed this out to me a long time ago and I still have an involuntary physical reaction, something like a shudder, when I hear someone say "utilize" or "utilization".

Question 1: Does anyone have a context where utilize is more appropriate than use?

Question 2: Can anyone provide other examples for my amusement?
Wisdom is the quality that keeps you out of situations where you would otherwise need it
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
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December 21st, 2009 at 12:55:23 PM permalink
I would agree that they are pretty much interchangable, so why utilize (sorry, I couldn't resist) "utilize"? It seems to me that people might say "utilize" if they really needed what they are referring to. As if to put an emphasis on it. For example, if I were on Millionaire, and had a question where I had no clue as to the answer, I might say that I want to utilize a lifeline.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
DorothyGale
DorothyGale
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December 21st, 2009 at 12:57:44 PM permalink
Quote: dwheatley



Question 1: Does anyone have a context where utilize is more appropriate than use?

Question 2: Can anyone provide other examples for my amusement?



Q1: The utility truck utilizes useful tools.

Q2: The way you spell "utility" is u.t.i.l.i.t.y.

There are a number of other multi-syllabic and essentially useless words, one of which is "essentially" but the most notable word with essentially no useful utility is "basically."

--Dorothy
"Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness!"
kristim55
kristim55
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December 21st, 2009 at 1:27:00 PM permalink
I've got a different pet peeve. I'd rather see someone vary their words, like using 'use' and 'utilize,' rather than say 'use' over and over. Gets boring.
Wavy70
Wavy70
Joined: Nov 3, 2009
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December 21st, 2009 at 6:25:58 PM permalink
Quote: dwheatley

I was reading the wizard's review on the Freemont and stumbled across this gem:

"I'm taking a stand against using multi-syllabic words when simple ones will suffice"

My biggest gripe in this category is "utilize". I am pretty convinced that in every possible context, "use" means the same as "utilize". My dad pointed this out to me a long time ago and I still have an involuntary physical reaction, something like a shudder, when I hear someone say "utilize" or "utilization".

Question 1: Does anyone have a context where utilize is more appropriate than use?

Question 2: Can anyone provide other examples for my amusement?



Worrying about the manner of the message can twaddlize the meaning.
I have a bewitched egg that I use to play VP with and I have net over 900k with it.
wildqat
wildqat
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
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December 25th, 2009 at 12:15:48 AM permalink
ESCHEW OBFUSCATION
odiousgambit
odiousgambit
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December 25th, 2009 at 3:48:46 AM permalink
Quote: wildqat

ESCHEW OBFUSCATION



OK, wildqat gets the award
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder
blackorange
blackorange
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October 1st, 2010 at 12:52:35 PM permalink
"I'm taking a stand against using multi-syllabic words when simple ones will suffice"


Question 1: Does anyone have a context where utilize is more appropriate than use?





Yes, my song goes "I want to utilize my odds, so I can brutalize your wads"

OK?
lol
mkl654321
mkl654321
Joined: Aug 8, 2010
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October 1st, 2010 at 1:32:52 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I would agree that they are pretty much interchangable, so why utilize (sorry, I couldn't resist) "utilize"? It seems to me that people might say "utilize" if they really needed what they are referring to. As if to put an emphasis on it. For example, if I were on Millionaire, and had a question where I had no clue as to the answer, I might say that I want to utilize a lifeline.



One of the wonderful aspects of English is its immense vocabulary, which enables a user of the language to distinguish fine shades of meaning.

To "use" something is to employ it in some fashion to accomplish some goal. To "utilize" something is TO MAKE IT USEFUL. When Bear Grylls constructs a raft out of the debris he finds on a desert island, he UTILIZES the debris. When he takes out his knife to cut palm fronds to lash the debris together, he USES that knife.
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw
mkl654321
mkl654321
Joined: Aug 8, 2010
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October 1st, 2010 at 1:38:53 PM permalink
Quote: DorothyGale

Q1: The utility truck utilizes useful tools.

Q2: The way you spell "utility" is u.t.i.l.i.t.y.

There are a number of other multi-syllabic and essentially useless words, one of which is "essentially" but the most notable word with essentially no useful utility is "basically."

--Dorothy



Not quite. "Basically", as it SHOULD be used, refers to a thing's reduction to its primary nature: "For all her pretensions, she was basically just a poor girl from Kansas." "Essentially" refers to essence, the fundamental nature of a thing: "Dorothy's essence was that she was a poor girl from Kansas."

The distinction is subtle and most people consider the words interchangeable. "Basically" has been kicked downstairs in the vernacular because so many people use it as a blank-space let-my-mind-catch-up-with-my-mouth placeholder (like "like").
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw

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