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Doc
Doc
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April 5th, 2012 at 6:22:34 AM permalink
Quote: s2dbaker

Caesar's Tahoe?


No, I don't have one of those. The place had become MontBleu by the time I was there. A Caesars (note: no apostrophe) Tahoe chip image was posted by zippyboy back when I posted mine from Caesars Palace.

The correct answer has been included in comments in the past couple of days, and I will make today's post in just a couple of minutes.
Doc
Doc
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April 5th, 2012 at 6:35:43 AM permalink
State: Nevada
City: Mesquite
Casino: CasaBlanca


So, to everyone who enjoys the guessing game and hasn't yet figured out the trick of getting the right answer (almost) every day, here is today's Casino Chip of the Day!

The day before I met the Wizard in person for the first time, my wife and I took a little excursion from Las Vegas up to Mesquite. We visited three casinos there for me to collect souvenir chips, and I managed to lose money at craps in all three of them. That was pretty much the way my gambling results went for that entire trip. Overall, I lost money in seven out of ten sessions. But, I did add to my collection.

I was particularly impressed with the grounds around the CasaBlanca casino. They have a nice lake out front that they call their lagoon, with fountains, ducks, and geese that I think make the appearance of the place rank right up there with some of the Las Vegas Strip properties. But Mesquite is just not quite so convenient to drop by if you are staying on Fremont Street.

We had planned to make our return from Mesquite to Las Vegas by way of the loop through Moapa Valley and the Valley of Fire. Unfortunately, we were there in a high-wind period with lots of thick dust/sand in the air. We decided that the hikes/walks we had in mind would not turn out to be any fun after all. Revised plan: Back onto I-15 for the return trip.

The CasaBlanca chip is a plain white base with four edge inserts plus a center insert with the casino's name in white on Red and a beige desert scene and palm trees.

When I posted the Boulder Station chip back on 3/29, I made a couple of comments about upcoming chips, including, "I will be able to point out two other manufacturer's logos within the next week, followed by one I would like some help identifying." Well, this CasaBlanca chip is the one I thought I wanted help on. I was going to describe the logo molded into eight spots on the perimeter as the opening for a Torx screwdriver, except each of them has eight points instead of the Torx's six.

Fortunately, though, Ayecarumba recently made a post in this thread that provided me a link to a new resource on casino chips. That led me to other resources, and I now can identify the manufacturer of this chip. I learned this logo is referred to as a Sun mold and that it is a mark of the Blue Chip company of North Las Vegas. The same source provided the following info of how Blue Chip is related to other companies that I have mentioned before:

Quote: antiquegamblingchips.com

The company was organized by some members of the Endy family after they sold Paul-son Co. to the huge French-owned Bourgogne et Grasset Co. (now called Gaming Partners International Corporation, abbreviated GPI Corp.).


That's somewhat similar, though not identical, to the info I provided before. Hopefully, after this thread progresses through a few hundred chips we might all learn a little more about casinos, their chips, and the chip manufacturers. I'm always open to new information the rest of you can provide on these topics.



Edit 5/27/12: Check this post later in this thread about UV images visible on this and other chips.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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April 5th, 2012 at 7:13:42 AM permalink
I think that perhaps Mesquite and Laughlin are the Predictors for Las Vegas.

Laughlin was the ultra low roller haven of pickup trucks, jeans, cowboy hats, RVs, two-dollar movies and cheap Geritol.
Mesquite was in the other direction, had plenty of water, large landholdings in the area, a relaxed pace and a wee bit more of an upscale patina to it. Mesquite casinos were conservatively managed but not necessarily well managed. It was more the over all economy rather than their own debt service obligations that got Mesquite casinos in trouble. In good times, the casinos never really had any outreach programs and never had any ties-ins with all the sporting events motorists speeding by were bound for. Mesquite was confident that Mesquite would be a sufficient "draw" or "attraction" for the upscale gambler.

Laughlin was the beginning of what happened in Vegas when everyone in Vegas started going after the low rollers, the families, the slot machine-fixated "gamblers". Laughlin never sought out the knowledgable or sophisticated gambler, just gamblers who knew "Laughlin is cheap". So suddenly all of Vegas starting going after the unsophisticated, slot-playing ignorant types who wanted cheap entertainment.

Laughlin chips will probably remain in a moribund market as Laughlin remains a place for the elderly, but Mesquite chips might increase in value as the Mesquite area may just start attracting its target audience of upscale golfers and other outdoorsmen.
rdw4potus
rdw4potus
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April 5th, 2012 at 7:43:09 AM permalink

I'm surprised by how similar the $1 and $5 chips are here. I also enjoyed Casa Blanca's grounds, and found the casino itself to be quite nice for being in the middle of nowhere. Mesquite in general was pleasantly surprising. I was expecting Pahrump II, but the quality was more in line with (slightly below) the Coachella Valley casinos in CA.

One odd difference: My chip is a Paulson, but the inlay is identical to Doc's chip.
"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett
Doc
Doc
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April 5th, 2012 at 8:01:51 AM permalink
Quote: rdw4potus

One odd difference: My chip is a Paulson, but the inlay is identical to Doc's chip.


My guess, with not much backup, is that your chip is older than mine. Under this theory, CasaBlanca was buying their chips from Paulson but instead of staying with Gaming Partners International, they went with that supplier's former owners' new company, Blue Chip. The rights to the center insert graphics probably belong to the casino rather than the chip manufacturer, so CasaBlanca provided the insert graphic (with the red ring for the $1 chip changed to black for the $5 chip) to Blue Chip. That's my story and I'm sticking to it until someone comes up with a better one.
rdw4potus
rdw4potus
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April 5th, 2012 at 8:15:29 AM permalink
I acquired my chip in October of 2010. I don't know how long it'd been in the tray, and I didn't notice if there were chips from more than one manufacturer present. I wonder what the chip sourcing process is like. Does specialization present a hurdle to changing vendors, or are the clay blanks enough of a commodity that a change is easy to make?
"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett
Doc
Doc
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April 5th, 2012 at 8:26:05 AM permalink
I got my CasaBlanca chip on April 27, 2010. If a casino changes chip suppliers for a refill of chips, I suspect they would have a chip mix in their trays for years. They would only have uniformity if they withdrew a series of chips.

I'm not sure what you meant by specialization and clay blanks. I think that there is probably a significant hurdle to being able to enter the chip business and know how to produce a quality chip. In this case, however, the Blue Chip company was started by the family that had owned Paulson. They probably retained enough expertise to start up Blue Chip, and they may have stolen key employees from their former company. The trick would have been to have avoided some sort of non-compete clause in the sale of their old business. They may have had a good enough personal relationship with the buyers at a bunch of casinos so that Blue Chip marketing had an advantage over the people they sold Paulson to.

Pure speculaton.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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April 5th, 2012 at 9:03:19 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

Pure speculaton.

As prices and safety scares about the ingredients vary, perhaps prices vary as do the decision makers at the casinos. In the pure speculation department, I might think that the requirement for a casino to have two entire sets of chips on hand at all times just might make the casino want to have two totally different sets not just in "design" but also in look and haptic feedback. This would make the second set, kept in reserve, more valuable since any major robbery or counterfeiting event that forced a sudden change would involve a change in the look and feel of the chips that all personnel would have at all times, thus rendering the stolen chips as worthless during even the most hectic times. Worthless at the tables, worthless at the cage, immediately suspect to all employees irrespective of their roles or their seniority.

So buying from two companies could just be a safety measure or a casino ploy to keep the market competitive rather than a monopoly.
teddys
teddys
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April 5th, 2012 at 9:16:09 AM permalink
Every reference I see to the casino calls it CasaBlanca (no space).
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
Keyser
Keyser
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April 5th, 2012 at 9:35:46 AM permalink
Casinos do keep two sets. Periodically they will bring out the other set when they place holds on certain chips because of thefts. In recent years the Bellagio, MGM and Caesars have, at some point, used the back up chips.

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