MrV
MrV
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September 11th, 2011 at 7:28:36 PM permalink
I've followed the growth and development of RFID technology, and wonder just how common it really is in Las Vegas casinos these days.

I know that the chips stolen by the Bellagio Bandit were RFID - encoded: see:

RFID
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 11th, 2011 at 8:18:10 PM permalink
Quote: MrV

I've followed the growth and development of RFID technology, and wonder just how common it really is in Las Vegas casinos these days.



I would think that it would be nearly impossible to find statistical information, as it of such a huge advantage to a casino to keep you wondering how many chips are encoded. But simple logic would seem to say that any business would be crazy to create something of value of $100 or more that weighs 11.5 grams and not encode it with the latest technology to prevent theft.

The article you highlighted indicates that some casinos are experimenting with $25 RFID chips. I doubt that is as widespread.

The monthly chip and token report only discusses design of latest approved chips, not security.

By the way, if you have been following the absolute disaster of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing for the last few years, in their attempt to print a new high security $100 colored banknote. Perhaps the government should simply quit trying. They could stop printing the $50 banknotes, and replace the $100 banknotes with casino chips with RFID technology. That way they could scan people at airports and see if they are carrying more than $10,000. Of couse it would be much heavier to walk around with huge amounts of cash.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 11th, 2011 at 9:31:51 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Of couse it would be much heavier to walk around with huge amounts of cash.



They don't really fit in your wallet either.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 11th, 2011 at 11:46:31 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

They don't really fit in your wallet either.



Perhaps they wouldn't be a good replacement for the $100 bill. However, they might be a good replacement for the $1,000 bill.

The arguments against introducing a banknote higher than $100 is fear of counterfeiting, money laundering would be easier, transport of large amounts of cash for nefarious purposes would be easier, etc. etc.

The arguments for re-introducing the $500 banknote is that when the $500's were ordered destroyed in 1969 a $100 banknote was worth far more than a $500 is today. The Euro and the Swiss Franc have banknotes with $700 and $1200 respectively. The biggest argument is that with over 7 billion $100 banknotes circulating around the world, replacing them periodically with newer versions is becoming an ever increasingly difficult and expensive task.

A $1000 government issued casino chip would be a compromise. It could act like currency, but the holder would have to be wiling to give up some privacy. If he wants to board an airplane with $100K he could submit to having his chips scanned. Today you have to fill out an IRS form if you have $100K in cash. It would be much harder to counterfeit the chip since you would have to counterfeit the RFID code.

You could have a currency that would be harder to use illegally. Perhaps it could take the place of a few billion of the hundred dollar banknotes circulating.

=========================
Britain stopped the buying and selling of 500 euro note by money wholesalers.
FleaStiff
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September 12th, 2011 at 1:03:09 AM permalink
Quote: MrV

I know that the chips stolen by the Bellagio Bandit were RFID - encoded.

It appears that they were not. The gunman was so well known at the Wynn that after the robbery he was able to formally exchange some of his stolen chips at the cage thus showing that at least those particular chips were not encoded in any manner.
Nareed
Nareed
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September 12th, 2011 at 7:03:46 AM permalink
Is there any reason RFID chips coulnd't be woven into a bank note's fabric?
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
MrV
MrV
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September 12th, 2011 at 8:31:00 AM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

It appears that they were not. The gunman was so well known at the Wynn that after the robbery he was able to formally exchange some of his stolen chips at the cage thus showing that at least those particular chips were not encoded in any manner.



If he was able to cash some stolen Bellagio chips as a courtesy at Wynn, well, that proves nothing except that Wynn didn't have the technology in place to detect the RFID signal from the Bellagio chip: and why should they?

They have their own chips to keep track of, and RFID signal codes differ from casino to casino, apparently.

Such courtesy chip cashes are done at a casino's peril; I suspect the suits at Bellagio smiled when they told their counterpart from Wynn, when rejecting the purloined chips: "Sorry, these were stolen, and are not redeemable."

The Bellagio chips were RFID-embedded in denominations of $100 and higher, which effectively made them nearly-worthless to an informed thief.

see ... RFIDchips

Oh, wait a minute ... did you 'misspeak?"

Did you mean to say "Bellagio" instead of "Wynn?"

If so, and if the thief cashed them at the Bellagio cage, not the Wynn cage, then I cannot explain the failure of Bellagio to detect the presence of an RFID encoded chip.

Curious.
"What, me worry?"
pacomartin
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September 12th, 2011 at 11:36:16 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Is there any reason RFID chips coulnd't be woven into a bank note's fabric?



Yes it can physically be done, but currently it would be damaged under normal or heavy use. They are still working on the technology.

But cash (especially large banknotes) is prized for it's anonymity as well as for it's ease of carrying as well as it's universal acceptance. People may shy away from it if it is trackable.

My suggestions was to create a $1000 chip as a compromise. A chip weights 11.5 grams, only slightly more than 10 banknotes. It provides some of the simplicity of cash for large transactions, but you lose some of the privacy in that it is more traceable.

Someone could register the chips and put them in a safe in his home. If the home is robbed, then the chips can be tracked like any other stolen good.


The next question is can you put a tracking chip in a larger plaque, as well as an RFID chip.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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September 12th, 2011 at 11:52:27 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The next question is can you put a tracking chip in a larger plaque, as well as an RFID chip.



Yes. However, the battery life would be limited, unless there was some way to passively recharge it. However, why would you want to do it? I suspect concerns about the signal causing cancer will be raised.

The RFID chips can be used (passively) for tracking. You just need to have enough readers in the right places. Grocers were experimenting with tagging all the items in their stores so that a shopper would simply roll their entire basket into a reader and in a few seconds get an itemized total.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 12th, 2011 at 12:08:18 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

Grocers were experimenting with tagging all the items in their stores so that a shopper would simply roll their entire basket into a reader and in a few seconds get an itemized total.



From this 5 year old commercial I was expecting it to be fairly widespread by now.

The possibilities are limitless. I suppose that you could begin tracking pedophiles with surgically planted devices. Schools could sense when a pedophile is nearby. Children of wealthy parents could carry a device that will alert the child and call a parent if a pedophile is near them.

No one will object to pedophiles being tracked. But from there you could branch out to all kinds of people. If you implant a chip in some people's hands, it will inactivate guns which will be required to have a matching technology. That way convicted felons won't be able to operate guns.

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