waasnoday
waasnoday
Joined: Jan 13, 2015
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November 10th, 2015 at 3:50:29 PM permalink
To all who have served and all who are serving, I say Chi Miigwetch! (thank you in my native language).
kewlj
kewlj
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November 10th, 2015 at 4:44:31 PM permalink
Quote: waasnoday

To all who have served and all who are serving, I say Chi Miigwetch! (thank you in my native language).



+100.
SOOPOO
SOOPOO
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November 10th, 2015 at 4:53:41 PM permalink
Quote: waasnoday

To all who have served and all who are serving, I say Chi Miigwetch! (thank you in my native language).



Whenever I see a man or woman in military garb; at an airport, mall, park, stadium,... I always go up to him or her and say "Thank you for your service".
I mean it.
djatc
djatc
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November 10th, 2015 at 4:58:17 PM permalink
Sports Cuts is giving out $1 haircuts for all military on Veteran's Day. More money to bet on slots!

Also Station's is giving away a buffet for military as well.
"Man Babes" #AxelFabulous
Face
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Face
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November 10th, 2015 at 5:07:23 PM permalink
Nya:weh ja:goh. "Thank you, well done" in Native tongue.

Any reason for the date? Is it just to juxtapose Marine's b-day, or is there a story to it?
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kewlj
kewlj
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November 10th, 2015 at 5:08:23 PM permalink
Quote: djatc

Sports Cuts is giving out $1 haircuts for all military on Veteran's Day. More money to bet on slots!

Also Station's is giving away a buffet for military as well.



Free buffet at Boyd casinos as well for Veterans.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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November 10th, 2015 at 6:02:16 PM permalink
Quote: Face

Nya:weh ja:goh. "Thank you, well done" in Native tongue.

Any reason for the date? Is it just to juxtapose Marine's b-day, or is there a story to it?

November 11, 1918 was Armistice Day, commemorating the end of what ended up being World War I. In 1919, the day was made a national holiday. In 1954, after WWII and Korea, the name was changed to Veteran's Day. Here's an article with more details.

I am curious regarding thanking those who served. Do they feel appreciated, or is it weird and ingenuous that folks are saying thanks for something they know nothing about?
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
Doc
Doc
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November 10th, 2015 at 6:36:18 PM permalink
I have no idea how today’s troops feel about it. I know that as servicemen returned home from fighting in Viet Nam, many were treated with extreme disrespect by people who had done nothing for their country but try to tear it down by protesting against its government. Many of those servicemen had great difficulty dealing with both their experiences overseas and the harsh reception at home – far different from the reception of returning servicemen after the previous two major wars. I think some of them never recovered, and a few words of belated thanks, even from those who know nothing about the experiences, couldn’t do much harm. Same, I expect, for saying thanks to those serving these forty-five years or so later.
kewlj
kewlj
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November 10th, 2015 at 6:57:26 PM permalink
I have never served my country. I have never protested my government, but I have not agreed with some of the military involvement the Government has gotten us into. BUT, those are two very different issues. I suspect some who served in various wars, dating back to Vietnam. and Korea may not have agreed with the war, but they did their duty, protecting our country and the freedoms that I enjoy and for that I am truly grateful.

Whenever I encounter a serviceman or veteran, wearing something that identifies them as such, I try to make it a point to thank them for their service, if I can do so without intruding or interrupting them. Nearly everyday I do have that opportunity. It's been my experience that most seem to appreciate it.

One of my favorite things to do is when I am eating in a café or restaurant (not a buffet where you pay in advance), and I see a couple gentlemen (it's usually gentlemen) wearing something that identifies them as a veteran, I like to pay for their meal on my way out as a 'thank you'. It's not something I do often, maybe once a month, maybe not even that. When I am not so absorbed in my own life and think of it and have the opportunity.
waasnoday
waasnoday
Joined: Jan 13, 2015
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November 10th, 2015 at 7:01:53 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

November 11, 1918 was Armistice Day, commemorating the end of what ended up being World War I. In 1919, the day was made a national holiday. In 1954, after WWII and Korea, the name was changed to Veteran's Day. Here's an article with more details.

I am curious regarding thanking those who served. Do they feel appreciated, or is it weird and ingenuous that folks are saying thanks for something they know nothing about?



Can't speak for all of course but the co-worker and another friend that I just called were both very pleased to be thanked. It may a bit different in other communities but my tribe opens every ceremony and most large staff meetings with an honor guard who carry our eagle staff and flags (US, Tribal, State, and POW). We appreciate and honor these men and women at pretty much the same level as our elders. Some do not speak of what they have endured and others do speak of their service in order to educate our young regarding the true costs of war as a balance to what the young (and adults too) see on TV and in video games.

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