Thread Rating:

EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 425
  • Posts: 24291
August 9th, 2020 at 4:19:55 PM permalink
Quote: billryan

This isn't really a remember when story, but it's worth telling and this seems the best place to tell it.
It's 1960ish, and my Father is a Senior NCO i



People were much more into
other peoples business than
they are now. You always
had to consider 'what would
the neighbors' think before
you did anything. I don't even
know who my neighbors are
anymore and don't care.

The woman who lived across
the street on Bewitched was
a very real stereotype. People
related to her. I doubt you
would even see that character
in a show today.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
  • Threads: 265
  • Posts: 14484
August 10th, 2020 at 1:54:25 PM permalink
Remember when all we wanted to do was win the Jackpot, but now we want to win under a fake name and undisclosed social security number'?
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 425
  • Posts: 24291
August 10th, 2020 at 8:45:08 PM permalink
Remember when people sold vacuums,
and encyclopedias, and life insurance,
and vitamins, and garden seeds, and
magazines, door to door? People
actually made a good living doing
this. I can't count the number of
times my mom had a salesman in
the living room.

Especially people selling magazines.
We got most of our news from
magazines and newspapers. From
Life and Look and Time and Newsweek
and Sports Illustrated and Readers
Digest. And hundreds more.

You could get a whole year of the
Saturday Evening Post for $3. Any
house you went into had a stack
of magazines on the coffee table
and a TV Guide on by dads chair.
You could raise a family selling
magazines door to door. Almost
too hard to believe.

When I was a kid in the 50's
I thought real life was like the
covers of Saturday Evening
Post:



"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
zonzhu
zonzhu
Joined: Aug 12, 2020
  • Threads: 0
  • Posts: 3
August 15th, 2020 at 1:44:33 AM permalink
I also watched it through online since 2016
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 221
  • Posts: 12164
August 15th, 2020 at 4:44:23 AM permalink
Quote: billryan



Christmas 1965, or possibly 1966. My Dad had this German camera that you had to make multiple adjustments for each picture. I wanted a camera I could actually use. Santa comes and my wish came true. I get a Kodak camera, complete with flash cubes and a case.
In my mind, I'm the man of the hour , getting everyone to pose for pictures and such. Then, my Uncle shows up and gives my sister a Polaroid Swinger. Instead of waiting a week or two to see the photos you take, they come out instantly. I went from hero to zero in a flash as the near-instant photos are the hit of the party.



A big value of instant photos was that not only were they instant, you could develop just what you needed. This was a big thing if you had to bid jobs or needed a pic for an insurance claim. House appraisers used them for their reports.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
Johnzimbo
Johnzimbo
Joined: Sep 29, 2010
  • Threads: 4
  • Posts: 883
August 15th, 2020 at 5:49:59 AM permalink
Remember when you would buy an album because you liked a song from the radio...and then find out the radio version was shortened for top 40 play?

Two that I recall are American Woman by Guess Who and Green Eyed Lady by Sugarloaf.
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 175
  • Posts: 9967
August 15th, 2020 at 6:03:06 AM permalink
I remember when some radio executive or whoever decided to make a 3.00-minute version of Freebird so the few remaining top forty format stations could play it.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 425
  • Posts: 24291
August 15th, 2020 at 9:58:19 AM permalink
Quote: Johnzimbo

Remember when you would buy an album because you liked a song from the radio



Remember when the most famous
people in your town were the
competing radio jocks? They
would show show up at summer
events like car shows and river
races. Like Wolfman Jack in
American Grafitti. A top 40
jock being famous now sounds
ridiculous, but made perfect
sense in 1966.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
  • Threads: 159
  • Posts: 3179
August 16th, 2020 at 4:51:17 AM permalink
𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘔𝘢𝘯𝘺 𝘓𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘋𝘰𝘣𝘪𝘦 𝘎𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘴

I 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 this show - had to see it every week
Dobie trying to make out with hot chicks, his hard nosed grocer dad always trying to straighten him out
Maynard G. Krebs the beatnik who avoided work - and Zelda who was hot for Dobie but he wasn't hot for her
and the icing on the cake - 𝘛𝘶𝘦𝘴𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘞𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘩𝘢𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘴𝘪𝘵𝘤𝘰𝘮 𝘣𝘢𝘣𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘦𝘳𝘢 - 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘯𝘵



Last edited by: lilredrooster on Aug 16, 2020
𝘱𝘢𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘰𝘵: 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘰𝘯 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘳 𝘭𝘰𝘶𝘥𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘦 𝘪𝘴 𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵............. ᴍᴀʀᴋ ᴛᴡᴀɪɴ
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 425
  • Posts: 24291
August 16th, 2020 at 11:48:30 AM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘔𝘢𝘯𝘺 𝘓𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘋𝘰𝘣𝘪𝘦 𝘎𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘴

I 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 this show -



One of the few sophisticated comedies
on TV at that time. Most comedies,
like Lucy, Beaver, Mayberry, and later
ones like Hillbillies, Green Acres,
Munsters, on and on, were childish
and ridiculous by comparison.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal

  • Jump to: