OneAngryDwarf
OneAngryDwarf
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December 17th, 2009 at 10:25:27 AM permalink
I went to a nearby casino to play Pai Gow poker for the first time a few days ago, and was surprised to find that they do not allow player banking. I've also heard that a lot of players do not like it even when it is allowed because they don't want to lose money to another player (ridiculous, I know).

For those of you in other areas of the country, is this also the case? Or is my experience an anomaly (the state lottery commission, which regulates the casinos, is notorious for silly and overzealous regulations like this.)
"I believe I've passed the age/of consciousness and righteous rage/I've found that just surviving was a noble fight... I once believed in causes too/I had my pointless point of view/And life went on no matter who was wrong or right..." --Billy Joel
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 17th, 2009 at 11:39:34 AM permalink
Here in Vegas you rarely see players invoking their right to bank in pai gow poker, even playing one on one against the dealer. You see it more often in pai gow tiles. It is true that many players, especially Asians, don't like to play against other players. Some of them will deliberately bet a lot more than they usually do against you, just to make you back down.

To dilute the effect of player banking, some casinos only allow it on a rotational basis, and sometimes the turn will zig-zag between the players and dealer, with the dealer banking every other hand. If a player chooses not to bank, the turn reverts to the dealer. I've even seen it where if a seat is empty, the turn reverts to the dealer, so a player could only bank once every 14 hands.

I predict that player banking will fade away, either with rule changes like the one you mentioned, or with variants like EZ Pai Gow Poker that don't allow it to begin with.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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December 17th, 2009 at 12:51:41 PM permalink
I don't bank, but will play when someone else banks.

I DO notice that most other players will sit out the hand when a player is banking.

Me? I tend to win more when a player is banking! Don't know why, but I'll keep playing!
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
dk
dk
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December 17th, 2009 at 1:09:59 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It is true that many players, especially Asians, don't like to play against other players. Some of them will deliberately bet a lot more than they usually do against you, just to make you back down.



Seems like that's exactly what you'd want as a banker assuming you were sufficiently bankrolled to handle the swings--get more money in when the odds are with you. I'll have to give it a shot.
The ratio of people to cake is too big.
teddys
teddys
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December 17th, 2009 at 2:12:33 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

To dilute the effect of player banking, some casinos only allow it on a rotational basis, and sometimes the turn will zig-zag between the players and dealer, with the dealer banking every other hand. If a player chooses not to bank, the turn reverts to the dealer. I've even seen it where if a seat is empty, the turn reverts to the dealer, so a player could only bank once every 14 hands.



This happened to me at Boulder Station when I was playing $5 pai gow (the every 14 hands rule). The pit boss yelled at the poor dealer for letting me bank every other hand. We bought agreed he was an a**hole. What a bush league rule!

Quote: dk

Quote: Wizard

It is true that many players, especially Asians, don't like to play against other players. Some of them will deliberately bet a lot more than they usually do against you, just to make you back down.



Seems like that's exactly what you'd want as a banker assuming you were sufficiently bankrolled to handle the swings--get more money in when the odds are with you. I'll have to give it a shot.



When I was playing tiles one time with one other Asian guy, I tried to bank and he pushed all in to try and get me to back down. I pulled out my bankroll from my pocket and laid it on the table to cover him. He re-backed down pretty quickly!
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
dk
dk
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December 17th, 2009 at 6:52:54 PM permalink
Quote: teddys


When I was playing tiles one time with one other Asian guy, I tried to bank and he pushed all in to try and get me to back down. I pulled out my bankroll from my pocket and laid it on the table to cover him. He re-backed down pretty quickly!


Is it true that there is no table limit on bets between players when a player is banking? What happens if a player (or group of players) bets more than the banker can cover?
The ratio of people to cake is too big.
JB
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JB
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December 17th, 2009 at 7:04:34 PM permalink
Quote: dk

Is it true that there is no table limit on bets between players when a player is banking? What happens if a player (or group of players) bets more than the banker can cover?


I'm not sure about your first question since I have never seen anyone try to bet more than the table max against a player banker. But for your other question, the casino will not let you bank unless you have enough chips/cash on the table to cover everyone else's bet (including the dealer's). If you don't have enough, they won't let you bank.
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 18th, 2009 at 7:41:25 AM permalink
I don't know about the unlimited bet rule when a player is banking. It would make sense, but in Vegas I doubt that is the policy. In Macau, in baccarat, they have a maximum "differential" rule, meaning that the most they can lose in one round on either side is about one million Hong Dollars. So, if one player wants to bet 10 million on Player, and another 10 million on Banker, then the casino would be happy to accept both wagers. However, in Vegas they don't have that policy. I think they should.
Last edited by: Wizard on Jan 3, 2010
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 18th, 2009 at 9:58:46 AM permalink
I just asked about this at the Red Rock. Two dealers and a supervisor all said they would not allow going over the maximum in a player banking situation. When I pressed the supervisor about why ,she said that they have to get their maximums approved by the Gaming Control Board, and it would violate Gaming regulations to exceed them.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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December 18th, 2009 at 1:00:17 PM permalink
Gaming Control Board.

Yeah, that actually makes a LOT of sense.

Plus it guarantees that the posted limit is the maximum that a player can risk in a single hand.

Of course, that begs the question: What if you're playing BJ and betting the maximum? Does this limit your ability to split and double down?
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁

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