Riva
Riva
Joined: Apr 3, 2013
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May 3rd, 2015 at 1:37:27 PM permalink
Our big, 4-day festival is soon approaching and our "Vegas Tent" will be open for business. One of things that is frustrating is that the state only allows an organization sell $15,000 per day in player chips. Most evenings we sell out of chips after just a few hours. When that occurs, new players won't pay to come into the tent because they can't buy chips. Plus, players already on tables, go home because they can't replenish their chips. And, the house loses money because there are fewer people to sell beer and pizza to. It drives me absolutely bonkers!

The state does, however, allow two non-profit organization to conduct gaming events under the same roof provided each is in its own demarcated area, staffed by its own people, operating its own bank and, using unique chips within their own event. Players can travel from area to area to gamble however, the chips are not interchangeable. This scenario is quite common in the poker rooms throughout the state, specifically: 2 charities having an event in the same room (banquet hall or restaurant).

We want to copy this model for this year's event for the simple purpose of putting more money in play every night. Under the umbrella of our school are several, independent and fully- licensed 501(c) (3) organizations. Each of these sub-organizations could sponsor 4 events per year, with each event taking place a maximum of 4 consecutive days. Theoretically, we could have a charitable gaming event on our campus 365 days per year. But that would be difficult to manage, even if you wanted to do something like that.

So, it's not difficult for one of the sub-organization pull a license and conduct its own event in concert with another sub-organization under the same tent. For example, the Glee Club at one end of the tent and the Alumni Association at the other. The challenge is, as I see it, is that it is NOT poker. It is traditional gaming and, we now have to decide what games to offer in each demarcated area. And remember, the player chips in each area can not be used interchangeably by players. So, for example, a player would have to buy unique chips if he/she wanted to stroll over to the other area in order to play blackjack.

Personally, I have serious concerns over this arrangement but it's not my call, not the least of which are chip logistics, player confusion and player dissatisfaction. Plus, I feel that while it might put more chips "in the room", it could cause players to hoard chips from one area but playing in yet another. Bottom line, if chips aren't in play, we aren't making money. Perhaps I'm over-thinking this entire thing.

In any event, they are still going forward with this plan. So, this is what I suggested to them. In one area, offer 2, 20' double- roulette's, 1 9' single-roulette roulette and, 2 14' craps. The other area would house everything else: 20 BJ, 3 let-it ride, 2 money wheels, 5 holdem.

I apologize for the length of this post, however, this whole plan gives me the jitters. Any thoughts or comments are welcome. Thanks.
RonC
RonC
Joined: Jan 18, 2010
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May 3rd, 2015 at 1:58:35 PM permalink
Why not simply "mirror" the two areas--people would have their favorite game in either area and could buy in to both groups to play more?
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
Joined: May 21, 2013
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May 3rd, 2015 at 4:52:39 PM permalink
I wonder if the primary charity is ok with you cutting in the secondary? Unless you can virtually guarantee a doubling of the chips (selling out 30K), doesn't the primary get hosed to some extent?

I would agree with the mirroring, assuming the primary is up for the split. No reason you can't designate tables for one or the other charity (see below) as people start playing, except perhaps reserve 1 craps and 1 roulette for each. If they're not up for the split, and they have priority,

I don't know your setup, or how many dealer are standing around waiting for players, but my impression has been standing room only on all tables from your previous posts until the money runs out, then the survivors are scattered around. I guess I would advocate selling all primary charity chips first, then selling the secondary as you get to the last couple thousand primary available. Start with all tables for the primary chips, then start consolidating tables (since you have multiples of each game), transitioning from primary to secondary in real time, at least one table of each game, perhaps several. Yeah, it's complicated, but if you inform people at the time they buy chips (with signage) that this WILL be happening and they may have to relocate (likely only once if at all), I would think most everybody would cooperate. Especially since the alternative is that less people can play.

I'd have a set of signs (enough for each for each charity, flown like flags, that include images of chips accepted), placed on each table in the back corner. Change them out as you transition the table so people know where to go.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
Joined: Jan 12, 2010
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May 3rd, 2015 at 5:03:10 PM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

I wonder if the primary charity is ok with you cutting in the secondary? Unless you can virtually guarantee a doubling of the chips (selling out 30K), doesn't the primary get hosed to some extent?

I would agree with the mirroring, assuming the primary is up for the split. No reason you can't designate tables for one or the other charity (see below) as people start playing, except perhaps reserve 1 craps and 1 roulette for each. If they're not up for the split, and they have priority,

I don't know your setup, or how many dealer are standing around waiting for players, but my impression has been standing room only on all tables from your previous posts until the money runs out, then the survivors are scattered around. I guess I would advocate selling all primary charity chips first, then selling the secondary as you get to the last couple thousand primary available. Start with all tables for the primary chips, then start consolidating tables (since you have multiples of each game), transitioning from primary to secondary in real time, at least one table of each game, perhaps several. Yeah, it's complicated, but if you inform people at the time they buy chips (with signage) that this WILL be happening and they may have to relocate (likely only once if at all), I would think most everybody would cooperate. Especially since the alternative is that less people can play.

I'd have a set of signs (enough for each for each charity, flown like flags, that include images of chips accepted), placed on each table in the back corner. Change them out as you transition the table so people know where to go.


One of the charity poker rooms here in Michigan, and I'm sure Riva has heard about them, Sunnybrook, got so big that the bowling alley complex had a separate room built just for them. They have THREE charity organizations per day.
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
kenarman
kenarman
Joined: Nov 22, 2009
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May 3rd, 2015 at 5:51:20 PM permalink
I think you might be right on the hoarding of chips. If players are used to running out they might buy-in on both sides right away and keep one set in their pocket in case they go broke on the set they are using. You don't want chips in pockets.
Be careful when you follow the masses, the M is sometimes silent.

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