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playpianoking
playpianoking
Joined: Jan 6, 2010
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January 19th, 2010 at 12:38:49 AM permalink
I went to a Denver Nuggets basketball game at home in November '09 and I was in a private suite. The game was broadcast on ESPN and I noticed that there was a TV delay of a whopping 12-14 seconds.

My questions:
Is there a normal delay based on the network carrying the broadcast and/or does it depend on the sport?

Bodog has live betting available. I've done it on a couple of college football games while watching on TV. The bet immediately shuts off as so as the TV camera cuts and shows the offense lining up (bets would be if the next play would be a rush, complete/incomplete pass). Obviously you know where I'm going with this, but here are some givens:

1) Bodog is not stupid.
2) I haven't noticed live NBA betting. Is this because only the football broadcast really is LIVE?

Anyways, hopefully someone can provide some insight.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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January 19th, 2010 at 3:22:26 AM permalink
I believe there are Asian betting syndicates that often place bets thru various European sites. The Asian betting syndicates are said to have exploited minute differences between a live sporting event and the telecommunications reality of a "live" sporting event. One notable torture and murder of a young couple in London is said to have been a lesson as to what happens to those who make mistakes. It seems that someone with a cell phone at the event can get the word out real fast and some bets can be "past posted" even though the bookie who is watching the event live will not see the goal scored for several seconds.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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January 19th, 2010 at 4:34:17 AM permalink
Delays in 'live' broadcasts are not only common, but standard operating procedure. A delay is employed with someone on the 'kill' button just in case of foul language. This delay is typically 5 seconds, but can be as much as 15 seconds.

For whatever reason, the broadcast booth where the commentators sit often does NOT have glass on the front. Fans sitting near the broadcast booth CAN be overheard.

There can also be delays for other technical reasons. Have you ever been in a bar, watching a game on two different TVs and they are out of sync by several seconds?
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ 覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧 Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
boymimbo
boymimbo
Joined: Nov 12, 2009
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January 19th, 2010 at 8:40:30 AM permalink
I've noticed that HD broadcasts for my cable company is delayed by a couple of seconds. If the source is different, then you'll experience delays, even for sporting events. There is a measurable amount of time from the broadcasting site to the TV Network to the satellite to your cable company to your place of viewing... and it differs by source.
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cclub79
cclub79
Joined: Dec 16, 2009
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January 19th, 2010 at 8:50:13 AM permalink
As a broadcaster who has done play-by-play before, it varies greatly. In radio, we always tried to turn our delay OFF during live sporting events, because people at the game wanted to listen to the radio and follow the game. The stray profanity is not usually considered. In fact, When I first started, I was shocked that we simply plugged our headphones into a radio to listen to OURSELVES while we broadcast. Basically, before digital and IP, our signals would simply use a specific radio frequency to get the signal from the stadium back to the studio, then out to the transmitter. This would happen at the speed of light and there is, for all intents and purposes, no delay. Now that many signals are satellite or via the internet, there can be a delay.

You were probably watching a satellite service of the station on television at the game. They can delay as much as 30 seconds. But if you were watching on a hard-wired, cable system, the delay would probably be no more than 2 seconds, if that. (It's the delay from the location, to the satellite uplink, back to the network, then up to the network's satellite, then back to the cable company's dishes. This delay is only a second and a half...like when you see a TV interview where the person on location is delayed.) I've been to plenty of games where we were monitoring the off-the-air signal, and it was barely behind.

Slightly off topic, other than talk shows, most radio stations do not employ a delay when their DJs are on the air; callers are just never put on live.
playpianoking
playpianoking
Joined: Jan 6, 2010
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January 20th, 2010 at 1:00:07 AM permalink
Has anone been able to 'beat' the live betting by being at the game in a booth or by phone? C
Aussie
Aussie
Joined: Dec 29, 2009
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January 20th, 2010 at 2:03:43 AM permalink
Betfair (www.betfair.com) specifically warn to be careful when betting "in-play" as live does not neccessarily mean live. Very easy to do your money if you're betting on something live when its actually delayed by several seconds.
AndyLucian
AndyLucian
Joined: Apr 12, 2010
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April 12th, 2010 at 4:39:45 PM permalink
I work for a European sportsbook and we do occasionally get hit by 'late-bettors', these are easy to spot and they are discouraged from betting in the future.

There are people who've made a lot of money on betfair by betting court-side at Tennis tournements, there are significant advantages to be had from betting from English racetracks against people following the action on tv - again they do this on betfair.

Some European sportsbooks do bet in-play on NBA, but you aren't meant to access these from the US.
Roghaltz
Roghaltz
Joined: Apr 6, 2010
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April 12th, 2010 at 6:27:08 PM permalink
There was a long discussion on 2+2 about BodogLive betting. Apparently Bodog would renege on paying a large number of winning bets that were supposedly "late" while not refunding losing bets that were late also. A rep from Bodog said they would make it right in the thread (not sure if they ever did)

AndyLucian
AndyLucian
Joined: Apr 12, 2010
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April 13th, 2010 at 12:09:07 AM permalink
The company I work for which I can't name, if we are cancelling bets because they are late, cancel all bets from a given time. It's not common for us to cancel late bets, usually there will be a technical reason or human error behind it. The most common will be the bookmaker reopening a market that has finished by accident, so these late bettors aren't unlucky they are ineffectively trying to cheat. They never complain because they know what they've done.

When I suspect someone is late betting (ie they have an uncanny knack of getting things correct right at the last moment), I aren't allowed to cancel bets unless I can prove they are late, a hunch is not reason enough, we will pay out but might discourage the customer from playing with us again.

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