mickeycrimm
mickeycrimm
Joined: Jul 13, 2013
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January 15th, 2014 at 10:37:00 AM permalink
Quote: GWAE

However think of it another way. If the 1st person said, hey I have AK and are shoving all in. Would you call that with JJ, is it worth a coin flip for your stack?



The all in move was on the flop. I would call in a heartbeat with JJ if I knew the guy had AK. He's only got 6 outs on the turn and river.
"Quit trying your luck and start trying your skill." Mickey Crimm
mickeycrimm
mickeycrimm
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January 15th, 2014 at 10:42:09 AM permalink
Quote: socks

Why did you raise to $10 preflop? Do you raise every hand to $10. If not, you're probably giving away a lot of information. When someone raises different amounts and then makes a big raise, I either think "he doesn't want to get his AA's cracked.", OR "He doesn't want to have to play JJ's postflop." If this is the case, try not to give away info with your preflop raising strategy.

In this case, you didn't give yourself any maneuvering room, and I think your postflop play was probably correct given your preflop play. If you've played with these people before, you should probably also have notes on them tell you that they will do crazy things, in which case, you should probably be willing to put in 100 blinds on an overpair or you will get run over. I mean, their play in this hand is nuts, at the least, the second caller's play is nuts. You might could come up with a set and/or frequency of hands for which the first person's play is not. You are in a good game, got your money in good against bad player(s?), and shouldn't be questioning your play here.

Someone suggested that 10:1 is sufficient odds to set mine, but if you're raising AK/AQs here and occasionally non- premium hands, and not always c-betting, it makes it really tricky to get odds at 10-1.



When someone raises ten times the big blind I usually put them on "scared queens or jacks."
"Quit trying your luck and start trying your skill." Mickey Crimm
mickeycrimm
mickeycrimm
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January 15th, 2014 at 10:45:20 AM permalink
Quote: MidwestAP

Sure, and some people just can't get away from their AK no matter what.



The old time no limit players like Doyle Brunson used to call AK "walking back to Houston."

"Hey! Where's Joe?"
"He's walking back to Houston."
"How come?"
"He kept overplaying them AK's."
"Quit trying your luck and start trying your skill." Mickey Crimm
mickeycrimm
mickeycrimm
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January 15th, 2014 at 10:51:05 AM permalink
Quote: hook3670

I know it part of the game, but I can't believe 2 people went all in with just an AK unsuited and no hope for flush or straight. On another hand with these relatively small blinds, how do you play a great opening hand like AA. If you go all in most likely everyone will fold and I will win like $1, which has happened. if I gently enter the wagering to try and build the pot up, I risk the flop seer catching a blind lucky good hand, which happened to me, and killing me.



A lot depends on your stack size. With a stack like 200 big blinds AA usually wins a small pot or loses a big pot. With 50 big blinds you would have all your chips in by the turn and no tough decisions to make on the river.
"Quit trying your luck and start trying your skill." Mickey Crimm
hook3670
hook3670
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January 15th, 2014 at 11:10:31 AM permalink
True enough, I need to really learn the nuances of the game a lot better. I had a little over 100 big blinds and lost a big pot to someone flop looking with a 9,5 unsuited who caught a full house!
mickeycrimm
mickeycrimm
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January 15th, 2014 at 2:25:12 PM permalink
Quote: hook3670

I know it part of the game, but I can't believe 2 people went all in with just an AK unsuited and no hope for flush or straight. On another hand with these relatively small blinds, how do you play a great opening hand like AA. If you go all in most likely everyone will fold and I will win like $1, which has happened. if I gently enter the wagering to try and build the pot up, I risk the flop seer catching a blind lucky good hand, which happened to me, and killing me.



In Super System Brunson said he much preferred to play AK than AA because it is so much easier to get away from. With AK he would raise preflop, and c-bet the flop, but if got called or raised he was through putting money in the pot. Not so easy to do with AA.
"Quit trying your luck and start trying your skill." Mickey Crimm
Dicenor33
Dicenor33
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January 15th, 2014 at 2:50:13 PM permalink
Sure, I'll go all in pre flop. It beats a lot of ace high hands, plus smaller connectors.
UTHfan
UTHfan
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January 15th, 2014 at 3:22:37 PM permalink
well, the point is to get value. if you have good cards you get money in the pot and from there on in try to get good pot odds.
Going all in with preflop monster hands is a good way to quickly win a small pot consisting of blinds.
When you get into a preflop reraise battle with another player, then you start to consider your one on one odds against another suitably high hand.
But your monsters can be broken by people who stay in cheaply. It's a balance you have to consider.
Anyway, good preflop raise with JJ. The all-in move was either:
stupid flailing; or
great bluffing.
Since they managed to suck it out on the river, they were brilliant.
But if they had whiffed, your call would have been brilliant.
However, considering the all in (and the near 1:2 pot odds if my math is correct, paying $100 to win the 220 in the pot) after the flop, you may have just saved that 100 for a future play because it looked as if someone hit their set. If someone had two pair or trips at that point, you only had a few outs. And you were going against two players, so your odds were worse because of it.

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