GWAE
GWAE
Joined: Sep 20, 2013
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:18:35 AM permalink
I could have easily folded the JJ with an all in ahead of me.

If you said first action raised something like $12 and you shoved all in then I would be ok with that.

However think of it another way. If the 1st person said, hey I have AK and are shoving all in. Would you call that with JJ, is it worth a coin flip for your stack?
Expect the worst and you will never be disappointed. I AM NOT PART OF GWAE RADIO SHOW
hook3670
hook3670
Joined: May 17, 2011
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:26:53 AM permalink
Thanks. I am fairly new to tournament or cash game poker. I don't want it to be an expensive tutorial, however I want to learn to play as well as possible. The problem with really low limit games is everyone just stays to see the flop and its just who ends up with better cards like a house banked game.
MidwestAP
MidwestAP
Joined: Feb 19, 2012
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:33:28 AM permalink
Quote: GWAE

I could have easily folded the JJ with an all in ahead of me.

If you said first action raised something like $12 and you shoved all in then I would be ok with that.

However think of it another way. If the 1st person said, hey I have AK and are shoving all in. Would you call that with JJ, is it worth a coin flip for your stack?



The first action after the flop, was all-in. If he showed me AK (not told me), I'd absolutely call with JJ. That's not a coin flip. If it was just me and him, I'd be about a 3-1 favorite. With another opponent all in with the same holding, it's even better.

I think the decision to fold or call after the flop was tough. The all in by the first opponent screams KK, QQ, but if he plays loose, or has recently taken a beat, I think a call can be justified.

In the end, you got your money in way ahead, so regardless of the result, you played it right in my opinion.
hook3670
hook3670
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:37:43 AM permalink
He had just taken a bad loss to me. I beat him with a flush versus his three tens. He did normally play pretty loose and I though he was trying to bluff me into getting some of his money back. Now the third guy I wasn't sure about.
Buzzard
Buzzard
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:49:58 AM permalink
If it was just me and him, I'd be about a 3-1 favorite.

Wish you played more at my table. AK will win about 42% of the time against JJ.
Shed not for her the bitter tear Nor give the heart to vain regret Tis but the casket that lies here, The gem that filled it Sparkles yet
MidwestAP
MidwestAP
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:50:12 AM permalink
Sure, and some people just can't get away from their AK no matter what. The guy behind you most likely did not have AA, KK, QQ or you would have most likely seen a three bet pre-flop. So unless he flopped a set, I think you are ahead in most cases. I would't sweat it, sometimes the cards don't go your way.

It's always good to evaluate options and different play strategies. The same cards with different players, different stakes, and different history can absolutely change the decision to call or fold post flop.
MidwestAP
MidwestAP
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January 13th, 2014 at 10:54:51 AM permalink
Quote: Buzzard

If it was just me and him, I'd be about a 3-1 favorite.

Wish you played more at my table. AK will win about 42% of the time against JJ.



[Edit] After the flop the JJ is about 3-1 which is where the money got in.
paisiello
paisiello
Joined: Oct 30, 2011
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January 13th, 2014 at 11:02:21 AM permalink
Quote: MidwestAP

[Edit] After the flop the JJ is about 3-1 which is where the money got in.

Actually better than 3:1. Closer to 6:1 because there are only 4 cards left in the deck that will kill him.
socks
socks
Joined: Jul 13, 2011
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January 13th, 2014 at 11:03:07 AM permalink
Why did you raise to $10 preflop? Do you raise every hand to $10. If not, you're probably giving away a lot of information. When someone raises different amounts and then makes a big raise, I either think "he doesn't want to get his AA's cracked.", OR "He doesn't want to have to play JJ's postflop." If this is the case, try not to give away info with your preflop raising strategy.

In this case, you didn't give yourself any maneuvering room, and I think your postflop play was probably correct given your preflop play. If you've played with these people before, you should probably also have notes on them tell you that they will do crazy things, in which case, you should probably be willing to put in 100 blinds on an overpair or you will get run over. I mean, their play in this hand is nuts, at the least, the second caller's play is nuts. You might could come up with a set and/or frequency of hands for which the first person's play is not. You are in a good game, got your money in good against bad player(s?), and shouldn't be questioning your play here.

Someone suggested that 10:1 is sufficient odds to set mine, but if you're raising AK/AQs here and occasionally non- premium hands, and not always c-betting, it makes it really tricky to get odds at 10-1.
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
Joined: May 21, 2013
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January 13th, 2014 at 11:12:32 AM permalink
I am not a pro poker player, but I think you made the right move. You made a good bet, it just lost.

Now, what the hell is a "meatspace tournament", UTHfan? That's a new bit of lingo to me. lol...
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.

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