RenoAce
RenoAce
Joined: Mar 30, 2011
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March 30th, 2011 at 6:54:55 PM permalink
This applies to a six deck shoe game where only four decks are really used. What is the difference in house advantage between a six deck shoe and an eight deck shoe? Now, on the six deck shoe players are allowed to double down at any time, even after hitting their hand. How does this rule affect the house advantage?
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
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March 30th, 2011 at 7:23:43 PM permalink
Quote: RenoAce

Now, on the six deck shoe players are allowed to double down at any time, even after hitting their hand. How does this rule affect the house advantage?



6 decks, dealer hits on soft 17
Player may double after split: -0.6151%
Player may not double after split: -0.7598%

8 decks, dealer hits on soft 17
Player may double after split: -0.6444%
Player may not double after split: -0.7888%

Under normal rules not much difference between 6 and 8 decks

Player may double on any number of cards add 0.23%

6 decks, dealer may double at any time would be: -0.6151% + 0.23%=-0.3851%


Compares favorably with the following game
2 decks, dealer Hits on soft 17: Player may double after split: -0.3797%

Generally, on the strip you must play minimum $50 or $100 to get the house edge that low.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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March 30th, 2011 at 8:23:39 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Generally, on the strip you must play minimum $50 or $100 to get the house edge that low.

Probably worth it to play at that level though if you are able to. It may be a shorter time than some ten or twenty dollar table but if you play basic strategy without errors or distractions, its probably best to go for the lowest house edge you can get.
mkl654321
mkl654321
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March 30th, 2011 at 8:42:54 PM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

Probably worth it to play at that level though if you are able to. It may be a shorter time than some ten or twenty dollar table but if you play basic strategy without errors or distractions, its probably best to go for the lowest house edge you can get.



Well, yes and no. Since you're playing a -EV game in any event, if you can play a -0.70% game while betting $5 or $10 (like a normal 3:2 six deck game, for instance), then your variance will be much, much lower, and you'll be much less likely to bust out, than if you played the nominally "best" game as described above. I presume that the goal of any rational person playing a -EV game is to maximize entertainment value, which relates to longevity. If your bankroll is large enough, of course, you should play to maximize EV, but even in a case where you COULD absorb a brutal loss, the question is, would you want to? How would you feel if you went -$2200 for your trip, even if your starting bankroll WAS, say, $3000?
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw
teddys
teddys
Joined: Nov 14, 2009
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March 30th, 2011 at 11:08:41 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin


Generally, on the strip you must play minimum $50 or $100 to get the house edge that low.

No, you can get a decent 6 deck game with S17, LS, and RSA on the strip for $10-25 at the MGM properties.

Don't play a higher minimum game just to get a lower house edge. It's not worth it (for most people). Remember the variance doubles each time you double your bet. That is huge, and a .20% change is not gonna offset it.

Now, switching from 6:5 for $5 to regular BJ for $10, you will see a significant difference, and that is worth doing.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 30th, 2011 at 11:44:35 PM permalink
I actually wasn't giving advice. The OP asked what was the house advantage of 6 decks being able to double on any number of cards. Presumably he was evaluating a game at his local casino.

I told him the number, the equivalent game following normal rules, and then commented that an edge that low was only available to pretty high rollers on the strip.

I was trying to give him a feel for how good the "double on any number of cards" rule was, not telling him to play $100 hands on the strip.

Perhaps another way to say it is the rule "double on any number of cards" gives the player an advantage equivalent to the "dealer stands on soft 17" gives to the house. They would theoretically cancel each other out.

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