ddsdoni
ddsdoni
Joined: May 15, 2017
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Mission146
July 17th, 2021 at 5:07:54 PM permalink
Hi everyone,
I have decided to make this post as a reference to myself but I hope other players will find it useful.
Traditionally (at least since I've turned 18), all blackjack tables at Treasury Casino in Brisbane have had the following rules:

6 decks (CSM)
Dealer stands on soft 17
Double after split allowed
Double on 9-11 only (including soft totals)
Resplit to 2 hands
Split aces receive 1 card only
OBO
No surrender
BJ pays 3:2
House edge of 0.5551%



However very recently (<2 weeks ago), low limit tables ($15, $20, $25? (will confirm this)) have been introduced to a new variant called 'Star Blackjack'. The rules of this game are identical to the rules above with one exception. The dealer now must hit a soft 17. This results in a new house edge of 0.7769%

An interesting basic strategy play in this game some players may not be aware of is that since doubling on soft totals is allowed, doubling on a soft 19 vs a dealer 6 is the optimum play.

In the Queensland Casino Gaming Rule, the legislation for the game can be found in 'Schedule 2(d) - Soft 17 Blackjack'. The legislation has a typo that says blackjack only pays 1 to 1, but the table felt and the rule sign at the tables show the correct payout of 3:2.
neverquitwhenup
neverquitwhenup
Joined: Jul 27, 2015
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August 15th, 2021 at 7:22:35 AM permalink
That is known as fake blackjack
not worthy at all.
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
Joined: Jun 22, 2011
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August 15th, 2021 at 7:39:29 AM permalink
Quote: ddsdoni

An interesting basic strategy play in this game some players may not be aware of is that since doubling on soft totals is allowed, doubling on a soft 19 vs a dealer 6 is the optimum play.


Question: in Queensland, if you double on a soft 19 and draw a 2, is that considered a 21, or an 11 (since you can't double on a 19)?
ddsdoni
ddsdoni
Joined: May 15, 2017
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August 19th, 2021 at 8:46:05 PM permalink
Quote: ThatDonGuy

Question: in Queensland, if you double on a soft 19 and draw a 2, is that considered a 21, or an 11 (since you can't double on a 19)?



Interesting question. I can't see any reason why the ace that you've been dealt would be considered a 1. My reasoning for this is that if you split aces you receive 1 card only and the ace you have is automatically counted as 11.
charliepatrick
charliepatrick
Joined: Jun 17, 2011
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August 20th, 2021 at 2:15:00 AM permalink
I think some European casinos count the Ace as 1 if you decide to double a soft total - so it's worth checking.
ddsdoni
ddsdoni
Joined: May 15, 2017
  • Threads: 5
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August 20th, 2021 at 3:32:02 PM permalink
Quote: charliepatrick

I think some European casinos count the Ace as 1 if you decide to double a soft total - so it's worth checking.



I can't imagine a player would be too happy about doubling a soft 16 (at a different casino for example) receive a 2 and their total is now an 8.

Definitely worth checking though. I wonder how much value from doubling is lost as a result of this rule? In this specific casino perhaps it's worth standing on a soft 19 instead of doubling?
chickenlover
chickenlover
Joined: Jul 19, 2015
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ddsdoni
August 28th, 2021 at 12:02:16 AM permalink
After doubling a soft total an ace is counted as 1 or 11 at all star properties.
davethebuilder
davethebuilder
Joined: Jan 11, 2015
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September 20th, 2021 at 2:54:25 AM permalink
Australian casinos mostly offer D9-11 on their Blackjack tables. This means that if your first two cards total 9,10 or 11 then you are permitted to double (excluding Blackjack). Your additional bet must be up to or equal to your original bet and you will receive one additional card only, laid 90° across your first two cards. In this situation, if one of your first two cards is an Ace then its point value is 1, not 11.
Casino Enemy No.1
davethebuilder
davethebuilder
Joined: Jan 11, 2015
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September 20th, 2021 at 3:03:32 AM permalink
If you are dealt two cards with the same point value you may split them and form two separate hands. Your additional bet must equal your original bet and at least one card will then be dealt to each hand. If one of those cards is an Ace then the rules are the same as described above. If you split Aces you will be dealt only one additional card to each hand and if it's a face card then the total is 21, not Blackjack.

The rules are laid out in the relevant state gaming codes and are standard in most Australian casinos.
Casino Enemy No.1

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