7star4now
7star4now
Joined: Jul 8, 2013
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February 13th, 2015 at 8:49:25 AM permalink
It won't help you in the event of an audit- the only way to substantiate losses is to maintain a detailed daily diary as reqd by the IRS. I've never met anyone who does this, so basically most gamblers are at the mercy of the IRS if audited. I've spoken to several CPA's who do not get the tax code when it comes to gambling losses themselves.

Most impt thing is to report all W2g's (handpays) reported to IRS by casinos- or their computers will automatically pickup a discrepancy.

"Gamblers frequently rely upon myths, urban legends and bad tax advice when it comes time to prepare their individual income tax returns."

MYTH #3: I can use a win/loss statement from the Casino to prove my gambling losses.

TRUTH: Wrong! The IRS consistently disallows such win/loss statements from Casinos since they frequently report the amount of wins or losses as a “net” amount. (Remember, wins are reported on Page 1 of IRS Form 1040 and losses are reported on IRS Schedule A.) Furthermore, the win/loss statements frequently include language stating that they are merely “estimates” and should not be relied upon."

http://www.ladyluckdiary.com/the-myths/

................................................................
IRS Revenue Procedure 77-29
by UNCLE SAM on AUGUST 31, 2010

SECTION 3. PROCEDURES.

An accurate diary or similar record regularly maintained by the taxpayer, supplemented by verifiable documentation will usually be acceptable evidence for substantiation of wagering winnings and losses. In general, the diary should contain at least the following information:

Date and type of specific wager or wagering activity;
Name of gambling establishment;
Address or location of gambling establishment;
Name(s) of other person(s) (if any) present with taxpayer at gambling establishment; and
Amount(s) won or lost.
Verifiable documentation for gambling transactions includes but is not limited to Forms, W-2G; Forms 5754, Statement by Person Receiving Gambling Winnings; wagering tickets, canceled checks, credit records, bank withdrawals, and statements of actual winnings or payment slips provided to the taxpayer by the gambling establishment.

Where possible, the diary and available documentation generated with the placement and settlement of a wager should be further supported by other documentation of the taxpayer’s wagering activity or visit to a gambling establishment. Such documentation includes, but is not limited to, hotel bills, airline tickets, gasoline credit cards, canceled checks, credit records, bank deposits, and bank withdrawals.

Additional supporting evidence could also include affidavits or testimony from responsible gambling officials regarding wagering activity.

http://www.ladyluckdiary.com/irs-information/irs-revenue-procedure-77-29/
fivespot
fivespot
Joined: Jul 12, 2010
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February 13th, 2015 at 5:24:44 PM permalink
Quote: 7star4now

MYTH #3: I can use a win/loss statement from the Casino to prove my gambling losses.

TRUTH: Wrong! The IRS consistently disallows such win/loss statements


It's a "myth" to say that the IRS does anything "consistently" where gambling is concerned. The one time I've dealt with IRS auditors, I provided a detailed contemporaneously-recorded daily diary, and they wanted to know where my casino won/loss statements were. They did eventually accept my documentation, but if I'd been able to provide won/loss statements it would have been useful. (I wasn't, as one of the two tiny casinos where most of my action occurred that year (over 500 W2G's totalling around a million) had no player tracking at all.)

Get and keep everything you can, who the hell knows what will satisfy the bozo who happens to look at your particular case.
JackStraw8004
JackStraw8004
Joined: Mar 27, 2013
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February 13th, 2015 at 6:48:40 PM permalink
The IRS didn't want to accept them because they were afraid players weren't using their players card or pulled it out of the machine to create losses. For the most part these days pulling your card doesn't work because the information is recorded on the last played hand whether you pull your card or not. In addition it would be stupid to play without a card as you cost yourself comp points and cash back. The IRS should accept the win/loss statements provided the casinos you claim you lost the money on your logs have player tracking cards.
darkoz
darkoz
Joined: Dec 22, 2009
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February 13th, 2015 at 7:16:16 PM permalink
Quote: JackStraw8004

The IRS didn't want to accept them because they were afraid players weren't using their players card or pulled it out of the machine to create losses. For the most part these days pulling your card doesn't work because the information is recorded on the last played hand whether you pull your card or not. In addition it would be stupid to play without a card as you cost yourself comp points and cash back. The IRS should accept the win/loss statements provided the casinos you claim you lost the money on your logs have player tracking cards.



I can tell you it works on electronic roulette or craps.

That's because the outcome has to be "read" by the computer and there is a delay, (approximately 2-4 seconds) where the machine freezes to log the outcome and then compute wins and losses at each seat.

If you glare at the dice and yank your card out as soon as you determine you are a winner you will keep the action from being recorded. At least, that is true of the casinos I have played and tried it on.

I did some tests where I simulated losses and simulated wins to see if I could get better comps and for the most part it works. However, I would not suggest doing that since it looks suspicious to the eye in the sky. You might get away with it in Craps if you simulate a loss on seven outs (you only sporadically remove your card then.)
For Whom the bus tolls; The bus tolls for thee
7star4now
7star4now
Joined: Jul 8, 2013
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February 13th, 2015 at 8:05:37 PM permalink
Quote: darkoz

I can tell you it works on electronic roulette or craps.

That's because the outcome has to be "read" by the computer and there is a delay, (approximately 2-4 seconds) where the machine freezes to log the outcome and then compute wins and losses at each seat.

If you glare at the dice and yank your card out as soon as you determine you are a winner you will keep the action from being recorded. At least, that is true of the casinos I have played and tried it on.

I did some tests where I simulated losses and simulated wins to see if I could get better comps and for the most part it works. However, I would not suggest doing that since it looks suspicious to the eye in the sky. You might get away with it in Craps if you simulate a loss on seven outs (you only sporadically remove your card then.)[/q

good info-tx]

JackStraw8004
JackStraw8004
Joined: Mar 27, 2013
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February 14th, 2015 at 3:41:34 PM permalink
I'm talking about video poker where players use to pull cards to exaggerate losses. If someone is playing electronic roulette or craps it's pretty hard to generate a taxable unless you are wagering big money on the craps game and betting more than $30 on individual numbers on roulette. The problem in video poker is the IRS thinks in many cases because you have a lot of W-2g's you have to be a winner.

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