TumblingBones
TumblingBones
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March 27th, 2017 at 12:09:12 PM permalink
I'm curious about the superstitions of Asian gamblers and I figure this would be a good place to ask some questions. For example, I've heard that 8 is a lucky number and white is the color of death but I've yet to find a reasonably complete list of what numbers, colors, sounds, and shapes/symbols are considered especially lucky or unlucky by gamblers. I'm also wondering if there are any regional differences (e.g., if whats considered lucky in China is unlucky in Japan or Korea). Any insights or observations?
smoothgrh
smoothgrh
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Thanks for this post from:
onenickelmiracle
March 27th, 2017 at 12:30:04 PM permalink
What I learned growing up is that 8 and 9 are lucky, and 28, 88, and 99 are especially lucky. Red is the color of blood and life, and is lucky.

The number 4 sounds like "death," and is unlucky. White symbolizes death, so it's unlucky.

I personally think some ancient people had too much time on their hands.

More info on Numbers in Chinese culture

I had never heard that 7 is supposedly unlucky among Malaysian Chinese
Last edited by: smoothgrh on Mar 27, 2017
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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March 27th, 2017 at 1:09:23 PM permalink
Here's some unsubstantiated info on lucky/unlucky numbers in China, Korea and Japan. Interestingly, they don't even issue license plates with the number 4 on them in China to avoid complaints.
America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed. - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
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March 27th, 2017 at 3:15:43 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

Here's some unsubstantiated info on lucky/unlucky numbers in China, Korea and Japan. Interestingly, they don't even issue license plates with the number 4 on them in China to avoid complaints.



Interesting that this presentation says that in China 3 is unlucky while the sources referenced by smoothgrh say it's lucky.

So far all the references seem to focus mainly on numbers and their similarity with various words. What about shapes or symbols? In western culture we've got lucky horseshoes and 4-leaf clovers but so far I've seen nothing similar in the Asian cultures. Would, for example, a triangle or a square have some significance because it resembles some pictogram?
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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March 27th, 2017 at 3:57:33 PM permalink
I think the slideshow indicated Chinese numbers are lucky/unlucky because they sound similar to words, while the Korean's approach them as resembling other words.

As for other things that offer "luck", the online "Feng Shui Mall", can hook you up with something for everything. It costs a lot to be superstitious. However, I think the idea of "luck" transcends cultures and goes to a base belief that we can influence the physical world by possessing objects with "spiritual energy", performing rituals, or saying incantations.

I see statues of frogs with open mouths, cats with one paw raised, dragons, fat Buddahs, "money" trees (a tree with fruit or leaves that resemble coins), and amulets with some inscription posted over or near the door/cash register of many Asian owned businesses. If you go to Asia, there is a large industry of "charm" sellers outside of the myriad temples that dot the landscape. Pay a fee to have bad spirits exercised, good luck, fertility, love, or good health... you can even pay to shake a can full of sticks until one falls out with your fortune on it. I think we call that "Magic 8 Ball" in the USA.

If the Asian market wasn't so big to Las Vegas, I am sure there would be more "lucky charms" from whatever culture was spending the money... Remember "Fitzgerald's" Pot o' Gold, the "Golden Goose" or "Alladin's Magic Lamp". What about the missing 13th floor on many elevators? I don't think the US is so different.
America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed. - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936
WatchMeWin
WatchMeWin
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March 27th, 2017 at 4:11:34 PM permalink
Asians are superstitious because they needed to have some type of reasoning for everything that had occurred in their lives. The government controlled them so much that they did not feel like that had any purpose or say in the future of their being. They had little hope to better themselves or further their careers. They believed that their destiny was predetermined. But thanks to the internet, knowledge of reality, and more global opportunity , Asians have hope for better lives. The worst thing that could have happened to the Chines government was the internet. Now the people know everything!
'Winners hit n run... Losers stick around'
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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March 27th, 2017 at 4:32:46 PM permalink
Quote: WatchMeWin

Asians are superstitious because they needed to have some type of reasoning for everything that had occurred in their lives. The government controlled them so much that they did not feel like that had any purpose or say in the future of their being. They had little hope to better themselves or further their careers. They believed that their destiny was predetermined. But thanks to the internet, knowledge of reality, and more global opportunity , Asians have hope for better lives. The worst thing that could have happened to the Chines government was the internet. Now the people know everything!



The "spiritual" world still permeates modern Asia. Annual "festivals" are steeped in superstition... eat certain foods (in with the lucky, avoid the unlucky), wear certain things (red strings, jade, etc.), perform certain actions (e.g., clean the house, light incense, visit the cemetery). These persist around the world, despite the enlightenment of the internet. I believe it is a common human thing that, even sub-consciously, recognizes the existence of more than the physical world.

Here's a link to an unsubstantiated research paper comparing the origins of Korean and Chinese "lucky" numbers.
America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed. - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936
terapined
terapined
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March 27th, 2017 at 5:02:07 PM permalink
My mother was Chinese
But
She was not into gambling

Regarding luck, all she told me to do was eat noodles on my birthday. She said it will bring me good luck
That's it. She really wasn't superstitious.
I always have noodles on my birthday :-)

Earlier in this thread, I saw that white was considered unlucky
weird
Because at weddings in Japan
The traditional bride will often use white makeup on their face
Last edited by: terapined on Mar 27, 2017
"Everybody's bragging and drinking that wine, I can tell the Queen of Diamonds by the way she shines, Come to Daddy on an inside straight, I got no chance of losing this time" -Grateful Dead- "Loser"
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
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March 27th, 2017 at 5:45:13 PM permalink
Quote: WatchMeWin

Asians are superstitious because they needed to have some type of reasoning for everything that had occurred in their lives.


Is what we call religion now.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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March 27th, 2017 at 6:09:58 PM permalink
Quote: terapined

My mother was Chinese
But
She was not into gambling

Regarding luck, all she told me to do was eat noodles on my birthday. She said it will bring me good luck
That's it. She really wasn't superstitious.
I always have noodles on my birthday :-)

Earlier in this thread, I saw that white was considered unlucky
weird
Because at weddings in Japan
The traditional bride will often use white makeup on their face



How about red envelopes for the kids?

As for the color white, it is akin to dressing the dead guy's body in a black suit in the casket. Dead bodies were adorned with white robes, so wearing white is considered unlucky... Having white skin however is a sign of prosperity and beauty as it indicates that you do not have to work outside in the sun.
America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed. - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936

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