Poll

5 votes (15.15%)
2 votes (6.06%)
18 votes (54.54%)
No votes (0%)
1 vote (3.03%)
4 votes (12.12%)
6 votes (18.18%)
No votes (0%)
2 votes (6.06%)
1 vote (3.03%)

33 members have voted

onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
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June 16th, 2017 at 12:41:07 PM permalink
Lets say what if Bob offers to bring Jim, Bob offers to pay with his $50 comp, Jim orders a $40 steak, which runs the total to $65, will Bob still pay for the dinner that disrupts his zero cash plan?
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
TigerWu
TigerWu
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June 16th, 2017 at 12:51:01 PM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

Lets say what if Bob offers to bring Jim, Bob offers to pay with his $50 comp, Jim orders a $40 steak, which runs the total to $65, will Bob still pay for the dinner that disrupts his zero cash plan?



If actual cash has to be involved, and I was Bob, I would use the $50 comp to get whatever I wanted, and any money left over I would give to Jim.

So, if my meal was $30 total, Jim would get $20, and he's responsible for anything over that.
darkoz
darkoz
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June 16th, 2017 at 1:16:15 PM permalink
Quote: TigerWu

If actual cash has to be involved, and I was Bob, I would use the $50 comp to get whatever I wanted, and any money left over I would give to Jim.

So, if my meal was $30 total, Jim would get $20, and he's responsible for anything over that.



What? Now Bobs free meal costs $20 amd Jim probably gets a freebie
LuckyPhow
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SOOPOO
June 16th, 2017 at 1:22:03 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Me too. And I've played the roll of both Jim and Bob. I'll let some more responses come in before I state mine ...



Maybe Jim and Bob should just roll some drunk gambler in the men's room and take his money. Then, it probably wouldn't matter which one played the role of the generous tipper, right?

Now, suppose a logical wizard and a penniless grammarian went together for lunch... but, of course, numerous erroneous assumptions would probably make the whole thing an extraneous event neither would enjoy.

Wiz, my answer to your original question is this: If Bob offers to treat me to lunch using his coupon, as we are about to finish eating, I will ask, "Bob, can I get the tip?" or say, "Bob, let me get the tip." And, whatever Bob decides is fine with me. If I have the buffet coupon and invite Jim to lunch, I'm planning to pay for the meal (free with my coupon, right?) and the tip. If Jim indicates his interest in leaving the tip, I will thank him and allow it rather than start a discussion about who should tip.
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
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June 16th, 2017 at 1:55:24 PM permalink
A coin flip might be fairest to determine which policy is used. Heads, Bob pays tip, tails Jim. This way neither knows ahead of time who gets the better deal.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
Wizard
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Wizard
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June 16th, 2017 at 2:10:29 PM permalink
Let me try to catch up. A lot of points to comment on.

Good point that in Reservoir Dogs nobody disputed that the old man shouldn't have to pitch in for the tip since he paid for the rest of the meal. That I totally agree with. Not just because that old man scares me to death. BTW, was he the same actor who played Elaine's father in Seinfeld? Anyway, by that argument, I think Jim should pay the tip, since Bob ultimately paid for the meal via his play. That it is a comp shouldn't matter.

Regarding Bob inviting, okay, that is a fair point. However, it is pretty common that the invitee pays the tip. This isn't a hard as fast rule, but I've seen it happen lots of times. I think it is a nice gesture. Now, if the person doing the inviting has some ulterior motive, like he is using the meal to ask for a loan, and it is primarily for his benefit, then let him pay for everything. So, if the meal was truly neutral in terms of topic and benefit, then I think the invited person should at least offer to pay the tip.

Another point made was what if it was at a fancy restaurant. Suppose a typical meal and drinks a this restaurant costs $150 per person. Also suppose the invited person is low on funds and/or to him the meal wouldn't be worth it to pay the $45-$60 tip. I know lots of people who get no more satisfaction from a $150 meal than a $15 one. Communication before the meal I think is the best remedy, although it can be awkward if the parties don't know each other well. Ultimately, I think the person inviting should pay the tip without hard feelings if the invitee doesn't seem to feel it is fair or affordable for him to pay it.

Yet another side issue is what happens if there is a big group and a comp doesn't cover the check the whole way. I think that if the comp covers at least two people's share, then the one who got the comp should not have to put in more cash and everybody else split up the difference equally. This is just a general rule of thumb and the means of those present and purpose of the meal can also factor into it.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
billryan
billryan
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onenickelmiracle
June 16th, 2017 at 2:35:58 PM permalink
A couple of weeks ago, I had a large group of friends out to dinner at Binions Steakhouse. They were in town for a concert and looking for a nice place for everyone to get together the night before.
I had a 25% off coupon which ended up saving quite a bit of money. It never occurred to me to say this was my share of the bill. I'd have looked down on anyone who made such a suggestion if they were the ones with the coupon.
In a similar vein, Another time a smaller group went to the seafood buffet at Rio and my friends handicap pass got us all in without the hour long wait. When the bill came, his wife actually suggested that that should be their contribution to the cost of the dinner. While I was still trying to figure out how to politely tell her to frig herself, he manned up and made a joke out of her sincere demand.
It's what you do and not what you say If you're not part of the future then get out of the way
GWAE
GWAE
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June 16th, 2017 at 3:13:29 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Let me try to catch up. A lot of points to comment on.

Good point that in Reservoir Dogs nobody disputed that the old man shouldn't have to pitch in for the tip since he paid for the rest of the meal. That I totally agree with. Not just because that old man scares me to death. BTW, was he the same actor who played Elaine's father in Seinfeld? Anyway, by that argument, I think Jim should pay the tip, since Bob ultimately paid for the meal via his play. That it is a comp shouldn't matter.

Regarding Bob inviting, okay, that is a fair point. However, it is pretty common that the invitee pays the tip. This isn't a hard as fast rule, but I've seen it happen lots of times. I think it is a nice gesture. Now, if the person doing the inviting has some ulterior motive, like he is using the meal to ask for a loan, and it is primarily for his benefit, then let him pay for everything. So, if the meal was truly neutral in terms of topic and benefit, then I think the invited person should at least offer to pay the tip.

Another point made was what if it was at a fancy restaurant. Suppose a typical meal and drinks a this restaurant costs $150 per person. Also suppose the invited person is low on funds and/or to him the meal wouldn't be worth it to pay the $45-$60 tip. I know lots of people who get no more satisfaction from a $150 meal than a $15 one. Communication before the meal I think is the best remedy, although it can be awkward if the parties don't know each other well. Ultimately, I think the person inviting should pay the tip without hard feelings if the invitee doesn't seem to feel it is fair or affordable for him to pay it.

Yet another side issue is what happens if there is a big group and a comp doesn't cover the check the whole way. I think that if the comp covers at least two people's share, then the one who got the comp should not have to put in more cash and everybody else split up the difference equally. This is just a general rule of thumb and the means of those present and purpose of the meal can also factor into it.



I was actually in the situation about your expensive dinner. A friend of mine took me out and prior to going he told me that he would cover dinner with his comps if I picked up the tip. I said sure. I ordered a $20 steak and a beer. He ordered surf and turf and a bottle of wine. Our total was $160 and I had to tip $30 which was more than it would have cost me for my steak by myself. Lesson learned on that one.
Wizard
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Wizard
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June 16th, 2017 at 3:16:57 PM permalink
Quote: billryan

A couple of weeks ago, I had a large group of friends out to dinner at Binions Steakhouse. They were in town for a concert and looking for a nice place for everyone to get together the night before.
I had a 25% off coupon which ended up saving quite a bit of money. It never occurred to me to say this was my share of the bill. I'd have looked down on anyone who made such a suggestion if they were the ones with the coupon.



Whether or not a coupon should count should depend on whether it was earned or not. If it was only 25%, then it was probably a free one so he should get thanked for applying it but it doesn't lower his share of the bill.

On the other hand, if it were an earned comp, and it covered 75% of the bill, then I think that should suffice for his contribution.

Quote:

In a similar vein, Another time a smaller group went to the seafood buffet at Rio and my friends handicap pass got us all in without the hour long wait. When the bill came, his wife actually suggested that that should be their contribution to the cost of the dinner. While I was still trying to figure out how to politely tell her to frig herself, he manned up and made a joke out of her sincere demand.



I agree with you 100% there.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
MaxPen
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Joeman
June 16th, 2017 at 5:47:11 PM permalink
I don't invite people to dinner unless I'm prepared to pay for all of it, including the tip. Fortunately I generally dine with decent people and if I'm picking up the tab they will tip. When dining with others on comp or them treating I always insist on tipping. Usually everything works out if the people you hang with are decent. If not, then don't hang out again. Pretty simple. I generally like to over contribute beyond my share on split bills if I know there are people in attendance that might have trouble contributing a full share. All in all I'm fine with just about anything as long as the bill doesn't cause a scene.

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