Suited89
Suited89
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May 25th, 2021 at 10:59:02 AM permalink
If I were to deal 13 cards from a shuffled (presumed random) deck of cards, how many different ranks should I expect to see?

Suited89
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ThatDonGuy
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Suited89
May 25th, 2021 at 4:13:15 PM permalink
After some serious number crunching, I get 188,474 / 20,825, which is about 9.05.
Wizard
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CrystalMathSuited89
May 26th, 2021 at 6:59:44 AM permalink
Quote: ThatDonGuy

After some serious number crunching, I get 188,474 / 20,825, which is about 9.05.



I agree. Using a Markov Chain, here is the average number after 1 to 52 cards.

Cards Exp Ranks
1 1.00000000000000
2 1.94117647058824
3 2.82588235294118
4 3.65642256902761
5 4.43505402160864
6 5.16398559423769
7 5.84537815126050
8 6.48134453781513
9 7.07394957983193
10 7.62521008403361
11 8.13709483793517
12 8.61152460984394
13 9.05037214885954
14 9.45546218487395
15 9.82857142857143
16 10.17142857142860
17 10.48571428571430
18 10.77306122448980
19 11.03505402160860
20 11.27322929171670
21 11.48907563025210
22 11.68403361344540
23 11.85949579831930
24 12.01680672268910
25 12.15726290516210
26 12.28211284513810
27 12.39255702280910
28 12.48974789915970
29 12.57478991596640
30 12.64873949579830
31 12.71260504201680
32 12.76734693877550
33 12.81387755102040
34 12.85306122448980
35 12.88571428571430
36 12.91260504201680
37 12.93445378151260
38 12.95193277310920
39 12.96566626650660
40 12.97623049219690
41 12.98415366146460
42 12.98991596638660
43 12.99394957983190
44 12.99663865546220
45 12.99831932773110
46 12.99927971188480
47 12.99975990396160
48 12.99995198079230
49 13.00000000000000
50 13.00000000000000
51 13.00000000000000
52 13.00000000000000
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Ace2
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May 26th, 2021 at 10:43:01 AM permalink
9.05 is about 69.6% of the 13 ranks appearing.

If you take this same problem but assume infinite deck, I believe the answer is 1 - 1/e =~ 63.2% as the number of ranks approaches infinity. For instance, if you assume 1,000 ranks and draw 1,000 cards, the average number of ranks appearing is very close to 632.

I got this via simulation. Assuming itís correct, can any of our calculus gurus get to the answer directly? I imagine the solution being an infinite series using inclusion-exclusion that turns out being an expression of 1/e...sort of like the derangement formula
Last edited by: Ace2 on May 26, 2021
Itís all about making that GTA
ThatDonGuy
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May 26th, 2021 at 10:59:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I agree. Using a Markov Chain...


My method:
First, determine all of the partitions of 13 such that no partition has more than 4 in it. This represents how many cards of particular ranks are in the hand.
For example, (4, 3, 3, 3) is a four of a kind and three threes of a kind, and (2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1) are three pairs and seven singles.

Take (4, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1) as an example.
There are 13 possible choices for the four of a kind rank.
For each one, there are 12 possible choices for the three of a kind rank, and for each one, there are four possible threes (for example, three Aces could be Ace of spades, hearts, and clubs, Ace of spades, hearts, and diamonds, Ace of spades, clubs, and diamonds, or Ace of hearts, clubs, and diamonds).
For each one of these, there are C(11,2) = 55 possible choices for the two pair ranks, and for each one, there are six possible pairs.
For each one of these, there are C(9,2) = 36 possible choices for the two single ranks, and for each one, there are four possible cards.
The total = 13 x 12 x 4 x 55 x 6 x 36 x 4 = 29,652,480 13-card hands.
The number of different ranks in each of these hands is 6.

For every possible partition (IIRC, there are 39 of them), multiply the number of hands by the number of different ranks, then sum these 39 numbers and divide by the total possible number of hands, which is C(52,13).
GM
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June 16th, 2021 at 1:47:19 PM permalink
If you assume infinite deck, then the limit is indeed 1-1/e. I have a proof, but it is 3 pages long and too mathematical to include in a reply. If there is a way to attach a pdf, I am happy to share it with anyone who is interested.
Ace2
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June 16th, 2021 at 3:30:46 PM permalink
Quote: GM

If you assume infinite deck, then the limit is indeed 1-1/e. I have a proof, but it is 3 pages long and too mathematical to include in a reply. If there is a way to attach a pdf, I am happy to share it with anyone who is interested.

I'm interested
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GM
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June 17th, 2021 at 8:03:34 AM permalink
Here is the link to the paper on my OneDrive. Delete the space after //
https:// 1drv.ms/b/s!AhDS5R4jVo9yk0SAPjJWg1Wf2ZxP?e=eZjpir
unJon
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GM
June 17th, 2021 at 8:06:20 AM permalink
Quote: GM

I have tried to include a link to it on my OneDrive, but the system won't let me, not even as plain text. :(



New posters canít post links until they have 20 posts. If you post it as a broken link it will appear.
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GM
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June 18th, 2021 at 8:52:00 AM permalink
I am quite confident that I have the answer for the general question when there are n ranks, k cards of each rank (so n=13, k=4 for a standard deck of playing cards) and we draw N cards, but I don't have a proof yet.

The expected number of different ranks is n(1-C(kn,N)/C(k(n-1),N)),
where C(r,s) denotes the binomial coefficient r choose s, the number of ways of choosing s different objects from a set of r objects if don't care about their order.

If n=N=13, k=4, then C(52,13)=635013559600, C(48,13)=192928249296, 1-192928249296/635013559600=14498/20825 and the expected number of different ranks is 13*14498/20825=188474/20825 in agreement with everybody else's calculations.

If we fix n=13, k=4 and let N vary, then my formula gives the numbers which are in the Wizard's table.

If we fix n and N, and let k tend to infinity, then the number of expected ranks tends to n(1-(1-1/n)^N), which is the answer in the infinite deck case.

If we fix k, and let N and n tend to infinity in such a way that N/n has a limit c, then expected number of ranks divided by n tends to 1-(1-(c/k))^k.

If k=4 and N=n, then this expression gives 1-(3/4)^4=175/256=0.68359375.

If k tends to infinity, then 1-(1-(c/k))^k tends to 1-1/e^c, which is the limit in the infinite deck case.
Last edited by: GM on Jun 18, 2021

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