Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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May 5th, 2011 at 12:06:08 PM permalink
Quote: gambler

With regards to building a casino in Hawaii:

The Hawaii State House of Representatives and Senate came very close this year to passing a bill which would allow for one (and only one) casino to be built and opperated in Waikiki. Hawaii, facing a $1.3 billion budget deficit over the next two fiscal years, was trying to find new ways to increase revenue for the state long term.

The bill was presented at the 11th hour and it was decided not to go forward because of wording problems. However, the amazing amount of popular support has had the state legislature strongly considering the bill. Expect to see it back in the limelight soon.

I would think that Boyd Gaming would jump all over that casino if they were given a chance.

Good blog posting by the Wizard. Perhaps he could review the casino if it is ever built.



Here's a bit of trivia... Did you know that in 2009, the Governor of Hawaii amended the state tax code to prevent residents of the state from deducting losses from their income tax calculation of gambling winnings? I can't imagine having to track and pay tax on every win, but not have the tax benefit of every loss.


The state was forced to reinstate the deduction a year later to bring them in line with the federal regulation.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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May 5th, 2011 at 12:19:29 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard


3. Kauai is next on my list. No direct flights from Vegas though.



IMO, Kauai is a lot like the North Shore, but without the nice beaches. There are some nice, scenic things to see, but it is a small, slow paced place. If you loved the North Shore of Oahu, it is more of the same, but without the option of driving to someplace open past 8 pm.

Kauai is the oldest of the main islands, and more north, so alot of the geography is worn and rustic. The weather is generally cooler, with bouts of rain on the north shore expected year round. There are some uber-exclusive resorts there if you are into that.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
Wizard
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Wizard 
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May 5th, 2011 at 1:24:39 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

IMO, Kauai is a lot like the North Shore, but without the nice beaches.



I've heard nothing but good things about Kauai. Any advice on a specific part of Kauai? Molokai intrigues me as well.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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May 5th, 2011 at 5:29:18 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I've heard nothing but good things about Kauai. Any advice on a specific part of Kauai? Molokai intrigues me as well.



The south side (Poipu Beach) is supposed to be sunnier, but I was there (several years ago) in November, so you get what you get (overcast, windy, occassional showers, big surf, even on the south side.) I stayed at the Hyatt, which was very nice for a Hyatt, and superior to their property on Maui. The swimming pool even had these waterslides built into the hillside that were pretty fun. High surf, surprising for a south facing beach, prevented anyone from going to close to the water.

Much of the island is undeveloped, or was still not fully recovered from 1992's Hurricane Iniki, even though years had passed. The main town, Lihue, where the airport is located, had like two stoplights. It was tough to find anything open in the evening, even restaurants, as most places close by 8 p.m. There was no nightlife to speak of, outside of a piano bar at the hotel, but it seems that this suits most visitors just fine. On the recommendation of the doorman at the hotel, I got a pizza from Brick Oven Pizza in Kapaa. I must say, that was a great pizza.

To get to most of the really scenic places (like the previously mentioned Jurrasic Park scenes) You may need a 4x4, or to charter a helicopter. Most of the beaches on the northern coastline (Napali) are protected by sheer cliffs and are not accessible from the island. The best way see them, or land there is by zodiac. Supposedly, there are awesome hiking and camping opportunities on the West side of the island (Waimea Canyon, the "Grand Canyon of the Pacific"), but sleeping in a tent, fighting off mosquitos, and carrying a heavy backpack does not make it a vacation for me. I also have some friends who had to be evacuated while hiking there when one of them slipped on a trail and broke his leg.

It is not too hard to find a secluded beach on the south side of the island, but being from Town, and having seen too many movies where innocent tourists are brutalized by crazies in secluded places, I have a hard time relaxing when I am in the middle of nowhere. Again, the vibe is much like the North Shore of Oahu, but when the surf is up, forget going in the water.

I took a helicopter tour, which was a great experience, if you are into waterfalls, and not prone to motion sickness. As an aside, hovering in a chopper is a much different (get your "aloha bag" ready) sensation, than when the helicopter is moving. I am not sure why. The helicopter tour was comped after enduring a time share sales pitch (but that is a story for another thread).

If you have the Netflix, check out Elvis' "Blue Hawaii". Much of it was filmed there, and it still looks the same.

One thing that surprised me is that the island is not that big a place. I got this fold out map with my rental car and plotted a course around the island to visit the north side, expecting it to be a day of driving, stopping and sightseeing along the way (like driving to Hana on Maui, or around the Big Island from Hilo to Kona). It turns out that in only 45 minutes on a well developed road, we were all the way on the other side of the island.

The Hawaii Tourism Authority has a great website with lots of info here.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
teddys
teddys
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May 5th, 2011 at 7:30:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought that too, but wasn't sure enough to throw the challenge flag. When I was house shopping two years ago my agent mentioned Lanais on houses here several times, and I know she used the term "casita" for a little guest house.

You're right. The guest house is called the "O'hana."

To salvage my mistake, let's pretend I was talking about the Lanai Express cafe at the Fremont.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
tripztour
tripztour
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April 19th, 2020 at 11:59:08 AM permalink
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