FarFromVegas
FarFromVegas
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May 5th, 2011 at 10:22:54 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I find it curious there's not a single mention of coffee.



I'm a serious coffee junkie. It's like a running joke in the family. But when we went to Hawaii we didn't do anything coffee-related. I don't even remember if the coffee I had therewas any better than what's on the mainland.

I did drink an inordinate number of maitais. Those I remember!!
Each of us is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts. Preparing for a fight about your bad decision is not as smart as making a good decision.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 5th, 2011 at 10:32:59 AM permalink
Quote: FarFromVegas

I'm a serious coffee junkie.



I'm not that serious ;)

Quote:

But when we went to Hawaii we didn't do anything coffee-related. I don't even remember if the coffee I had therewas any better than what's on the mainland.



Last trip to Vegas I bought what was said to be Kona at the ABC store Downtown. It's very dark and strong, but relly good. Some years back I bought a very expensive half pound of "Hawaiian Coffee" at a local store. Best coffe I've ever tasted, bar none. They never had it again :(

But then three years ago I spent a day and half in Xalapa, veracruz, and neglected to get any coffee, or even have a cup of the local brew.

I think I'll start another coffee thread...
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 5th, 2011 at 10:57:19 AM permalink
Quote: teddys

Great report....One thing I heard of on HGTV (love that channel) is that every house in Hawaii has an extra attachment called a "Lanai" that is a like a separate "mini-house" with a bathroom, living room, etc. Kind of (but not really) like a mother-in-law suite in the States. Did your rental house have this? By the way Honululu/Oahu has the second-highest lodging rates in the country, after New York City.



Thanks for the compliment. No Lanai at the house I rented. Maybe you could call that house of driftwood my kids made in the last picture our Lanai. They call those things a casita here Vegas, which would be Spanish for little house (casa = house, and the "ita" ending means small). Doesn't surprise me about Honolulu. All of Hawaii is very expensive for lodging. I used to say everything in Hawaii is expensive, but is the hotels/condos that really hurt.

Quote: Nareed

I find it curious there's not a single mention of coffee.



I could have added a story about that. While my wife was grocery shopping in Hale'iwa I was milling about the other shops. I came to a stand selling organic food. Being the sociable person that I am, I was happily chatting with the cute gal minding the stand. Most of the fruits I not only couldn't name but had never even seen before. So I was pestering her for a botany lesson. After wasting about ten minutes of her time I felt obligated to buy something. However, I didn't want to take a chance on some bizarre piece of fruit I would probably hate (I'm more of a vegetable man). So I noticed some bags of pure Hawaiian coffee. I want to emphasize pure because in the supermarkets so-called Hawaiian coffee is often only made from about 5% or 10% Hawaiian beans, the rest from elsewhere, probably Columbia. This bag was the whole way Hawaiian.

So I bought a tiny little bag for $10. Half way back to the car I realize that the bag contained whole coffee beans, and the house would probably not have a grinder, which it didn't. So I figured I would bring it home, sneak them into the Summerlin Costco, and use their coffee bean grinder. However, I didn't want my wife to get mad at me for spending $10 on a tiny bag of coffee beans with no way to grind them. So I hid them in the glove compartment of the car. You can guess what happened next...I forgot to take them out when I turned the car in. So I hope somebody with Dollar Rent a Car is enjoying them.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Doc
Doc
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:11:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

.... So I noticed some bags of pure Hawaiian coffee. I want to emphasize pure because in the supermarkets so-called Hawaiian coffee is often only made from about 5% or 10% Hawaiian beans, the rest from elsewhere, probably Columbia. This bag was the whole way Hawaiian. ...


I took a tour of Kona (on the west side of the big island) in 2004. The guide claimed that right there was the only place you could buy genuine, 100% Kona coffee. He said that when we got back to the 48 and saw a bag claiming "pure Kona coffee", that would be a bald-faced lie -- instead the product would be a blend, such as the Wizard described.

Doesn't make much difference to me; I don't drink the stuff at all. But I did buy a small bag of the beans in Kona for my brother, who was a bit of a coffee snob.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:11:43 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I forgot to take them out when I turned the car in. So I hope somebody with Dollar Rent a Car is enjoying them.

Hehe, or more likely, no one will notice for a long time, but the car sure has a "fresh brewed aroma".
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
Nareed
Nareed
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:16:01 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So I bought a tiny little bag for $10. Half way back to the car I realize that the bag contained whole coffee beans, and the house would probably not have a grinder, which it didn't. So I figured I would bring it home, sneak them into the Summerlin Costco, and use their coffee bean grinder.



My coffee addiction started in 1990 when I fell head over heels for the Colombian coffee I tried while on vacation in Orlando and Miami. I got a small bag of pure Colombian coffee, only to realize when I got home it was whole beans. I took them to a coffee store that had its own grinders, but they refused to grind it unless I bought something. Stupidly I dind't. So I shopped around for a cheap grinder, but got an attack of sticker shock every time. So eventually the bag languished for years at the back of the pantry.

Since then I make sure to check I'm getting grounds.

Oh, that vacation I also left my glasses in the rental car...
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:17:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

No Lanai at the house I rented. Maybe you could call that house of driftwood my kids made in the last picture our Lanai. They call those things a casita here Vegas, which would be Spanish for little house (casa = house, and the "ita" ending means small).



I always thought a "lanai" in Hawaiian architecture refered to a wide porch with furnishings and a view (aka, "veranda").
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
gambler
gambler
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:42:59 AM permalink
With regards to building a casino in Hawaii:

The Hawaii State House of Representatives and Senate came very close this year to passing a bill which would allow for one (and only one) casino to be built and opperated in Waikiki. Hawaii, facing a $1.3 billion budget deficit over the next two fiscal years, was trying to find new ways to increase revenue for the state long term.

The bill was presented at the 11th hour and it was decided not to go forward because of wording problems. However, the amazing amount of popular support has had the state legislature strongly considering the bill. Expect to see it back in the limelight soon.

I would think that Boyd Gaming would jump all over that casino if they were given a chance.

Good blog posting by the Wizard. Perhaps he could review the casino if it is ever built.
gambler
gambler
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:44:36 AM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

I always thought a "lanai" in Hawaiian architecture refered to a wide porch with furnishings and a view (aka, "veranda").



Ayecarumba is correct. It can also refer to a balcony.
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 5th, 2011 at 11:51:34 AM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

I always thought a "lanai" in Hawaiian architecture refered to a wide porch with furnishings and a view (aka, "veranda").



I thought that too, but wasn't sure enough to throw the challenge flag. When I was house shopping two years ago my agent mentioned Lanais on houses here several times, and I know she used the term "casita" for a little guest house.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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