Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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June 25th, 2019 at 6:18:08 PM permalink
"Awake: The Million Dollar Game Show" is on Netflix. I enjoy it, since it is part physical / mental / sleep deprivation endurance and bluffing. There's no, "tune in next week for the playoff round" to see if someone wins the 7 figure grand prize, it is resolved every episode.

It works like this:
Immediately before the on stage portion of the competition begins, the pool of 7 contestants spends 24 straight hours counting the quarters that they scoop from a container with $1,000,000 worth in the center of the room. They each keep their own secret count, but they all work in the same room which is equipped with a table, chair, and a wheeled cart for each player in a circle around the money pit. When the time is up, they secretly report their count to the producers as their cart of coins it taken away for verification. They then all are lead to the stage at the same time.

It is imperative that they put as many quarters as they can in their cart during the first phase, and keep an accurate count of their total, as the first two players are eliminated shortly after introductions. The first to go are the one with the least amount counted, and the one who is the least accurate. They get nothing.

With five players left on stage, a series of elimination "Minute to Win it" style challenges that require quick reaction time, hand-eye coordination, and/or fine motor skills are conducted with players performing the task out of sight of the others. At the conclusion of each elimination round, the winner of the challenge gets a pass to the next level, while the remaining players are offered a "buyout" to take a cash prize, or risk being identified as the worst performer and getting eliminated with no prize while the others move on. If no one takes the buyout, the worst performer is eliminated, and the others move on to the next challenge.

The buy out offer starts at $2,500 when there are five players, then goes to $5,000 when there are four; $7,500 at three; and finally $10,000 when there are just two players remaining.

When all the others are eliminated or bought out, the remaining player has some decisions to make:
1) Take the quarters he/she counted in the past 24 hours (usually $25k-$35k).
OR
2) Risk it and win the total of all the quarters everyone counted (around $150k).

The problem is, your prediction of your count must be within $500 of your actual total, high or low. If they are outside of that range, they get nothing.

If the player chooses the risk it, they are only informed if their count qualifies. They aren't told their verified total, because if they are within the high/low range...

They must choose to:
1) Take the new total and quit.
OR
2) Risk it all for $1,000,000

If they risk it, their count must have been within $25 high/low of the verified total, or they lose it all.

This game show has a lot going for it. I find the exhausted players who get goofy really entertaining. Some of the challenges were threading a series of needles, or popping balloons filled with cash and coins and trying to catch them money before it hit the ground. All things that are difficult to do when sleep deprived. They are not given a lot of time to make decisions on the buyouts, and when you think about how much is at stake, it is almost cruel to send the losers home empty handed. Almost.

My question for you is, "What is the best strategy for counting the most quarters while keeping an accurate count over 24 hours?"

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
Joined: May 21, 2013
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Ayecarumba
June 26th, 2019 at 4:20:30 AM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

"Awake: The Million Dollar Game Show" is on Netflix. I enjoy it, since it is part physical / mental / sleep deprivation endurance and bluffing. There's no, "tune in next week for the playoff round" to see if someone wins the 7 figure grand prize, it is resolved every episode.

It works like this:
Immediately before the on stage portion of the competition begins, the pool of 7 contestants spends 24 straight hours counting the quarters that they scoop from a container with $1,000,000 worth in the center of the room. They each keep their own secret count, but they all work in the same room which is equipped with a table, chair, and a wheeled cart for each player in a circle around the money pit. When the time is up, they secretly report their count to the producers as their cart of coins it taken away for verification. They then all are lead to the stage at the same time.

It is imperative that they put as many quarters as they can in their cart during the first phase, and keep an accurate count of their total, as the first two players are eliminated shortly after introductions. The first to go are the one with the least amount counted, and the one who is the least accurate. They get nothing.

With five players left on stage, a series of elimination "Minute to Win it" style challenges that require quick reaction time, hand-eye coordination, and/or fine motor skills are conducted with players performing the task out of sight of the others. At the conclusion of each elimination round, the winner of the challenge gets a pass to the next level, while the remaining players are offered a "buyout" to take a cash prize, or risk being identified as the worst performer and getting eliminated with no prize while the others move on. If no one takes the buyout, the worst performer is eliminated, and the others move on to the next challenge.

The buy out offer starts at $2,500 when there are five players, then goes to $5,000 when there are four; $7,500 at three; and finally $10,000 when there are just two players remaining.

When all the others are eliminated or bought out, the remaining player has some decisions to make:
1) Take the quarters he/she counted in the past 24 hours (usually $25k-$35k).
OR
2) Risk it and win the total of all the quarters everyone counted (around $150k).

The problem is, your prediction of your count must be within $500 of your actual total, high or low. If they are outside of that range, they get nothing.

If the player chooses the risk it, they are only informed if their count qualifies. They aren't told their verified total, because if they are within the high/low range...

They must choose to:
1) Take the new total and quit.
OR
2) Risk it all for $1,000,000

If they risk it, their count must have been within $25 high/low of the verified total, or they lose it all.

This game show has a lot going for it. I find the exhausted players who get goofy really entertaining. Some of the challenges were threading a series of needles, or popping balloons filled with cash and coins and trying to catch them money before it hit the ground. All things that are difficult to do when sleep deprived. They are not given a lot of time to make decisions on the buyouts, and when you think about how much is at stake, it is almost cruel to send the losers home empty handed. Almost.

My question for you is, "What is the best strategy for counting the most quarters while keeping an accurate count over 24 hours?"



I would figure out exactly how many quarters are in a standard roll BY TOUCH, pressing the bottom of a stack into the heel of my hand hard, same place each time, then to the exact point on my middle finger, as the roll lies in my hand. Press hard to create a sense-memory. After a few times (or even by teaching my hand the sense ahead of time), I would be very accurate in getting exactly 40. Then I just load my hand, dump, count by 10s (or 1s and multiply at the end).

Pretty easy and quick to take a handful of quarters and line them up in your hand vertically, then add a few to get to 40. Rinse and repeat.

Caveat: haven't watched the show, someone might have a better way. But you asked how I would do it.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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Ayecarumba
June 26th, 2019 at 7:31:05 PM permalink
yeah craps dealer would be great at that initial task, but that still leaves several hurdles to go.
Rigondeaux
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Ayecarumba
June 26th, 2019 at 8:42:17 PM permalink
I don't think the final risk is worth it for most people. Sounds like you'd miss very often.

Obviously, on a forum where we debate whether 2.4 million is a significant amount of money or whether it's unusual to have a quarter mil in your checking account, most of you'd be playing this game purely for recreational purposes, perhaps not even bothering to pick up the prize.

However, $150k is going to have a pretty big impact on the lives of most people. $1million is better, but I think the producers did a great job of picking a point where diminishing marginal utility really kicks in.

Like, if one of those women goes from $50k in student loan debt to no debt and making a beefy downpayment on a home overnight, that is a really big shift in her circumstances. If you add to that, a BMW and a bigger house and whatever, that's great, but the actual impact on her life is less significant the more money you add.
Zcore13
Zcore13
Joined: Nov 30, 2009
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Ayecarumba
June 26th, 2019 at 8:59:01 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

"Awake: The Million Dollar Game Show" is on Netflix. I enjoy it, since it is part physical / mental / sleep deprivation endurance and bluffing. There's no, "tune in next week for the playoff round" to see if someone wins the 7 figure grand prize, it is resolved every episode.

It works like this:
Immediately before the on stage portion of the competition begins, the pool of 7 contestants spends 24 straight hours counting the quarters that they scoop from a container with $1,000,000 worth in the center of the room. They each keep their own secret count, but they all work in the same room which is equipped with a table, chair, and a wheeled cart for each player in a circle around the money pit. When the time is up, they secretly report their count to the producers as their cart of coins it taken away for verification. They then all are lead to the stage at the same time.

It is imperative that they put as many quarters as they can in their cart during the first phase, and keep an accurate count of their total, as the first two players are eliminated shortly after introductions. The first to go are the one with the least amount counted, and the one who is the least accurate. They get nothing.

With five players left on stage, a series of elimination "Minute to Win it" style challenges that require quick reaction time, hand-eye coordination, and/or fine motor skills are conducted with players performing the task out of sight of the others. At the conclusion of each elimination round, the winner of the challenge gets a pass to the next level, while the remaining players are offered a "buyout" to take a cash prize, or risk being identified as the worst performer and getting eliminated with no prize while the others move on. If no one takes the buyout, the worst performer is eliminated, and the others move on to the next challenge.

The buy out offer starts at $2,500 when there are five players, then goes to $5,000 when there are four; $7,500 at three; and finally $10,000 when there are just two players remaining.

When all the others are eliminated or bought out, the remaining player has some decisions to make:
1) Take the quarters he/she counted in the past 24 hours (usually $25k-$35k).
OR
2) Risk it and win the total of all the quarters everyone counted (around $150k).

The problem is, your prediction of your count must be within $500 of your actual total, high or low. If they are outside of that range, they get nothing.

If the player chooses the risk it, they are only informed if their count qualifies. They aren't told their verified total, because if they are within the high/low range...

They must choose to:
1) Take the new total and quit.
OR
2) Risk it all for $1,000,000

If they risk it, their count must have been within $25 high/low of the verified total, or they lose it all.

This game show has a lot going for it. I find the exhausted players who get goofy really entertaining. Some of the challenges were threading a series of needles, or popping balloons filled with cash and coins and trying to catch them money before it hit the ground. All things that are difficult to do when sleep deprived. They are not given a lot of time to make decisions on the buyouts, and when you think about how much is at stake, it is almost cruel to send the losers home empty handed. Almost.

My question for you is, "What is the best strategy for counting the most quarters while keeping an accurate count over 24 hours?"



Thanks for the info. I've saved it for watching on my days off next week.


ZCore13
I am an employee of a Casino. Former Table Games Director,, current Pit Supervisor. All the personal opinions I post are my own and do not represent the opinions of the Casino or Tribe that I work for.
RS
RS
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June 27th, 2019 at 7:39:04 PM permalink
Sounds interesting. I guess it really depends on how the quarter counting goes. Can you pile up your count however you want or does it have to be in a single pile, effectively forcing you to keep a huge number in your head? If you could do separate piles, then you could obviously just do something like piles of 400 quarters and once you get 10 of those, combine them for $1k. Then at the end of the 24 hours, count up how many piles you have.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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June 27th, 2019 at 8:20:05 PM permalink
Quote: RS

Sounds interesting. I guess it really depends on how the quarter counting goes. Can you pile up your count however you want or does it have to be in a single pile, effectively forcing you to keep a huge number in your head? If you could do separate piles, then you could obviously just do something like piles of 400 quarters and once you get 10 of those, combine them for $1k. Then at the end of the 24 hours, count up how many piles you have.


In the episodes Iíve watched so far, they can definitely make stacks on the desk, but I havenít seen anyone try to use the floor as a workspace.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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July 6th, 2019 at 2:22:31 AM permalink
My first thought would be to count them in as the alphabet then count how many times I've said the alphabet. Then multiply and divide by 4. Numbers are too hard to count up without getting lost when boredom and distraction come in.
In the land of the blind, the man with one eye is the care taker. Hold my beer.
itsmejeff
itsmejeff
Joined: Aug 6, 2012
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July 6th, 2019 at 11:29:28 AM permalink
Easier system after some thoughts. Instead of confusing 1000 quarters through binary start, just break in down into $10 chunks with your count. Top right corner is 10^1 dollars, top left is 10^2 dollars, bottom left is 10^3, and bottom right is 10^4. Only add in groups of 40 quarters (8 stacks of 5 quarters, for example). No math other than putting dollars in their right place.

After adding 40 quarters to your bucket, place one marker on top right. Keep doing that until you get 10, and then place one on top left. And work your way around the board while having a perfect count. This allows you to accurately track and count every coin you dump in the bucket while reducing the number of counters you need. $38,320 would be 3 in bottom left, 8 in bottom right, and 3 in top left, and 2 in top right. Most of board is clear while you can instantly figure out how many quarters you have thrown in barrel. Stacks or 5, 8, or 10 could be easily replicated and compared without much trouble. Never need to remember big numbers.
Last edited by: itsmejeff on Jul 6, 2019

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