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Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
  • Threads: 178
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May 15th, 2020 at 3:50:00 AM permalink
Ride in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know, those were different times
Oh, all the poets, they studied rules of verse
And those ladies, they rolled their eyes
NO KILL I
Gialmere
Gialmere
Joined: Nov 26, 2018
  • Threads: 38
  • Posts: 1767
May 15th, 2020 at 5:49:50 PM permalink
Quote: DogHand

I believe the train has just pulled into...

"Conjunction Junction", what's your function?

As I recall, that tune also contained the lyrics, "In the mornings, when I'm usually wide awake, I like to take a walk down by the lake, where I often see a duck and a drake, and I wonder what they would say if they could speak, although I know that's an absurd thought."

One of the "Schoolhouse Rocks" songs.

Remember "I'm just a bill, yes I'm only a bill..."?

How about, "Figure eight as two times four..."?


Man, I wasted a LOT of Saturday mornings watching cartoons!

Dog Hand


Winner! Winner! Chicken AND Dumplings Dinner!!

Advertising executive David McCall noticed his young son was struggling with learning multiplication tables, despite being able to memorize the lyrics of every single Rolling Stones song. He hired musician Bob Dorough to write a song that would teach multiplication. This was the genesis of Schoolhouse Rock, a series of animated, musical short films that would try to teach kids various educational subjects.

The ABC network began airing them in the 70s during its Saturday morning cartoon schedule. Suddenly, as if by magic, kids were reciting the Preamble to the US Constitution from memory, telling their parents that interjections show excitement or emotion, and explaining why "3" is a magic number. The show had many catchy tunes, but the one that topped most people's list was "Conjunction Junction".


----------------------------------

In play...

Quote: Mosca

Ride in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know, those were different times
Oh, all the poets, they studied rules of verse
And those ladies, they rolled their eyes


-----------------------------------

And now, in the category Bluegrass, name that song...

I'm a bluegrass instrumental standard written by Earl Scruggs. I was recorded and released in 1949 but am best remembered for my appearance in the 1967 motion picture "Bonnie and Clyde". If you ever learn to play the banjo, you'll probably learn to play me.

Who am I?
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 3804
May 15th, 2020 at 6:39:09 PM permalink
Quote: Gialmere

Quote: DogHand

I believe the train has just pulled into...

"Conjunction Junction", what's your function?

As I recall, that tune also contained the lyrics, "In the mornings, when I'm usually wide awake, I like to take a walk down by the lake, where I often see a duck and a drake, and I wonder what they would say if they could speak, although I know that's an absurd thought."

One of the "Schoolhouse Rocks" songs.

Remember "I'm just a bill, yes I'm only a bill..."?

How about, "Figure eight as two times four..."?


Man, I wasted a LOT of Saturday mornings watching cartoons!

Dog Hand


Winner! Winner! Chicken AND Dumplings Dinner!!

Advertising executive David McCall noticed his young son was struggling with learning multiplication tables, despite being able to memorize the lyrics of every single Rolling Stones song. He hired musician Bob Dorough to write a song that would teach multiplication. This was the genesis of Schoolhouse Rock, a series of animated, musical short films that would try to teach kids various educational subjects.

The ABC network began airing them in the 70s during its Saturday morning cartoon schedule. Suddenly, as if by magic, kids were reciting the Preamble to the US Constitution from memory, telling their parents that interjections show excitement or emotion, and explaining why "3" is a magic number. The show had many catchy tunes, but the one that topped most people's list was "Conjunction Junction".


----------------------------------

In play...

Quote: Mosca

Ride in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know, those were different times
Oh, all the poets, they studied rules of verse
And those ladies, they rolled their eyes


-----------------------------------

And now, in the category Bluegrass, name that song...

I'm a bluegrass instrumental standard written by Earl Scruggs. I was recorded and released in 1949 but am best remembered for my appearance in the 1967 motion picture "Bonnie and Clyde". If you ever learn to play the banjo, you'll probably learn to play me.

Who am I?



You are “Foggy Mountain Breakdown”.
NO KILL I
Gialmere
Gialmere
Joined: Nov 26, 2018
  • Threads: 38
  • Posts: 1767
May 17th, 2020 at 2:03:45 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

You are “Foggy Mountain Breakdown”.


Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!!

After appearing in Bonnie and Clyde, "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" is now typically used by Hollywood for scenes depicting chases in a rural setting. The song would win a Grammy in 2001 for a performance featuring Scruggs with comedian Steve Martin on second banjo.


--------------------------

Still in play...

Quote: Mosca

Ride in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know, those were different times
Oh, all the poets, they studied rules of verse
And those ladies, they rolled their eyes


---------------------------

And now, in the category Country Rock, name that song...

My father was a gambler down in Georgia
He wound up on the wrong end of a gun
And I was born in the back seat of a Greyhound bus
Rollin' down highway forty-one
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 3804
May 17th, 2020 at 3:33:24 PM permalink
Quote: Gialmere

Quote: Mosca

You are “Foggy Mountain Breakdown”.


Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!!

After appearing in Bonnie and Clyde, "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" is now typically used by Hollywood for scenes depicting chases in a rural setting. The song would win a Grammy in 2001 for a performance featuring Scruggs with comedian Steve Martin on second banjo.


--------------------------

Still in play...

Quote: Mosca

Ride in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know, those were different times
Oh, all the poets, they studied rules of verse
And those ladies, they rolled their eyes


---------------------------

And now, in the category Country Rock, name that song...

My father was a gambler down in Georgia
He wound up on the wrong end of a gun
And I was born in the back seat of a Greyhound bus
Rollin' down highway forty-one



Ramblin’ Man, Allman Brothers Band
NO KILL I
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 3804
May 17th, 2020 at 5:29:51 PM permalink
I was at the stadium
There were twenty thousand girls called their names out to me
Marie and ruth but to tell you the truth
I didn't hear them I didn't see
I let my eyes rise to the big tower clock
And I heard those bells chimin' in my heart
Going ding dong ding dong ding dong ding dong.
Ding dong ding dong ding dong ding dong
Counting the time, then you came to my room
And you whispered to me and we took the big plunge
And oh. you were so good, oh, you were so fine
And I gotta tell the world that I make her mine make her mine
Make her mine make her mine make her mine make her mine
NO KILL I
Kilroy
Kilroy
Joined: Apr 24, 2020
  • Threads: 1
  • Posts: 4
May 17th, 2020 at 10:12:37 PM permalink
And now, in the category Country Rock, name that song...

My father was a gambler down in Georgia
He wound up on the wrong end of a gun
And I was born in the back seat of a Greyhound bus
Rollin' down highway forty-one



Ramblin’ Man, Allman Brothers Band




The Allman Brothers is one of my favorite bands. I must have seen them 15 times over the years. I met Gregg after a show in Chicago in 2005. Unfortunately they never had Ramblin' Man on the setlist when I was there.
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
Joined: Jun 22, 2011
  • Threads: 95
  • Posts: 4463
Thanks for this post from:
Gialmere
May 18th, 2020 at 8:10:15 AM permalink
Quote: Gialmere

Advertising executive David McCall noticed his young son was struggling with learning multiplication tables, despite being able to memorize the lyrics of every single Rolling Stones song. He hired musician Bob Dorough to write a song that would teach multiplication. This was the genesis of Schoolhouse Rock, a series of animated, musical short films that would try to teach kids various educational subjects.

The ABC network began airing them in the 70s during its Saturday morning cartoon schedule. Suddenly, as if by magic, kids were reciting the Preamble to the US Constitution from memory, telling their parents that interjections show excitement or emotion, and explaining why "3" is a magic number. The show had many catchy tunes, but the one that topped most people's list was "Conjunction Junction".


Schoolhouse Rock Questions:

1. A number of teachers reported that, when the question, "What is the Preamble to the Constitution?" appears on tests, a number of students could be heard singing the song. They all got the question wrong - because what words are missing?
What four words are missing from the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States in that song?
The song begins, "We the People, in order to form a more perfect union," but actually, it's, "We, the People of the United States"


2. In "I'm Just a Bill," what, exactly, is the law that the bill becomes? Hint: it's a real thing, but it may be only at state level.
All school buses must stop at railroad crossings.


Also, it wasn't always called "Schoolhouse Rock." In the first season, it was only the multiplication tables, and called "Multiplication Rock." In the second, Saturday mornings was Grammar Rock ("Grammar is not your grandma, it's your grammar"), and had only five of the nine songs (Noun, Verb, Conjunction, Interjection, Adverb); I think Multiplication Rock aired on Sundays.
DogHand
DogHand
Joined: Sep 24, 2011
  • Threads: 1
  • Posts: 403
May 18th, 2020 at 11:02:16 PM permalink
Quote: ThatDonGuy


Schoolhouse Rock Questions:

1. A number of teachers reported that, when the question, "What is the Preamble to the Constitution?" appears on tests, a number of students could be heard singing the song. They all got the question wrong - because what words are missing?
What four words are missing from the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States in that song?

The song begins, "We the People, in order to form a more perfect union," but actually, it's, "We, the People of the United States"




ThatDonGuy,

I used the song myself, but I knew the song was missing those words, so I managed to avoid making that mistake.

Dog Hand
Gialmere
Gialmere
Joined: Nov 26, 2018
  • Threads: 38
  • Posts: 1767
May 18th, 2020 at 11:15:31 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

Ramblin’ Man, Allman Brothers Band



Quote: Kilroy

Ramblin’ Man, Allman Brothers Band


Winners! Winners! Ramblin' Chicken Dinners!!

For the most part, the band didn't really care for "Ramblin' Man". They felt it was just too country when compared to their other songs. Ultimately, however, they decided the song was just too good to pass up. So they recorded it and it would become the Allman Brothers Band's only top 10 hit.



The selection of this song was inspired by this amusing moment of confusion on the WOV livestream... [Video cued]


--------------------------------
Still in play...

Quote: Mosca

Ride in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know, those were different times
Oh, all the poets, they studied rules of verse
And those ladies, they rolled their eyes



Quote: Mosca

I was at the stadium
There were twenty thousand girls called their names out to me
Marie and ruth but to tell you the truth
I didn't hear them I didn't see
I let my eyes rise to the big tower clock
And I heard those bells chimin' in my heart
Going ding dong ding dong ding dong ding dong.
Ding dong ding dong ding dong ding dong
Counting the time, then you came to my room
And you whispered to me and we took the big plunge
And oh. you were so good, oh, you were so fine
And I gotta tell the world that I make her mine make her mine
Make her mine make her mine make her mine make her mine

Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.

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