TinMan
TinMan
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  • Threads: 12
  • Posts: 105
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146
July 29th, 2020 at 5:28:34 PM permalink
I’ve used Hotels.com for years and had good experiences. Reservations are easy to make (and easy to cancel if you choose a property with a generous cancellation policy). Easy to search and filter. Hotel reviews are fair in my opinion.
If anyone gives you 10,000 to 1 on anything, you take it. If John Mellencamp ever wins an Oscar, I am going to be a very rich dude.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 122
  • Posts: 12715
July 29th, 2020 at 5:43:27 PM permalink
Keeneone makes another great point!

With exception only to the day of check-in, if you could find a lower rate anywhere online (or on our own site) and you asked me to match that rate, I’d do it without hesitation. But, that only applies if you book directly through me...I’d sometimes at least think about it if you booked via the franchise website(s).

Why not the day of check-in? Because if I had a group cancel (or walk-in traffic for an event wasn’t as expected) I would obviously drop the online rates by a good bit and take whatever I could get, especially after 7:00p.m. Leading up to the day that was booked, the only thing rates would do is go up nearly 100% of the time (supply and demand with supply dropping) unless I had a group cancel, or something.

Groups generally had a different cancellation policy as part of the group contract, so they were almost certainly getting charged SOMETHING anyway. Usually half. So, if I could sell the rooms for half of what they would have paid, or more (usually more), the hotel did better than had the group actually stayed.
Vultures can't be choosers.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 122
  • Posts: 12715
July 29th, 2020 at 5:45:34 PM permalink
Quote: TinMan

I’ve used Hotels.com for years and had good experiences. Reservations are easy to make (and easy to cancel if you choose a property with a generous cancellation policy). Easy to search and filter. Hotel reviews are fair in my opinion.



I guess I should correct my statement about hating all TPW’s equally. I hated Hotels.com slightly less than the others because the way they managed things was generally reasonable for both hotel and guests.

They still rake in a ton of money for doing almost nothing, though. Even the property pictures and descriptions they lifted straight from our site.
Vultures can't be choosers.
DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
  • Threads: 71
  • Posts: 6100
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146
July 29th, 2020 at 6:35:28 PM permalink
Mission, I was just wondering and if you are comfortable talking about it, what would be the lowest rate you could give and still make a small profit on a typical walk-in at night if you still had rooms available?

I am assuming you worked for a middle of the road chain hotel franchise.
Living longer does not always infer +EV
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 122
  • Posts: 12715
July 29th, 2020 at 7:24:24 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

Mission, I was just wondering and if you are comfortable talking about it, what would be the lowest rate you could give and still make a small profit on a typical walk-in at night if you still had rooms available?

I am assuming you worked for a middle of the road chain hotel franchise.



Slightly lower than middle of the pack, but probably a middle of the pack overall franchisor. I worked at an economy hotel that I would say was better than some, worse than others. We were on the lower end (franchise) of the franchises (hotel chains) of this franchisor.

Your question depends on a lot of different factors and is kind of a loaded question. I would say you’re better off to rent a room as opposed to not renting it at about $25, assuming you kept it, “Out of the computer.”

That wouldn’t make the hotel profitable, though, because of costs not directly related to that specific rental. Also, we’d obviously almost never rent a room at that rate. We’d sometimes do it if someone was broke down, homeless, too drunk and the cops asked for a favor...and we’d ask all involved not to tell anyone about it.

If we could theoretically have sold every room, every night, 365 days a year...we would have probably been slightly profitable at $40/night, even putting them in the computer, as long as none are TPW’s. That refers to the industry term REVPAR, which means, “Revenue per available room.” Of course, our REVPAR was actually higher than this, we did not sell out every night of the year and we were more than minimally profitable.
Vultures can't be choosers.
DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
  • Threads: 71
  • Posts: 6100
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146
July 29th, 2020 at 7:29:52 PM permalink
Quote: Mission146

Slightly lower than middle of the pack, but probably a middle of the pack overall franchisor. I worked at an economy hotel that I would say was better than some, worse than others. We were on the lower end (franchise) of the franchises (hotel chains) of this franchisor.

Your question depends on a lot of different factors and is kind of a loaded question. I would say you’re better off to rent a room as opposed to not renting it at about $25, assuming you kept it, “Out of the computer.”

That wouldn’t make the hotel profitable, though, because of costs not directly related to that specific rental. Also, we’d obviously almost never rent a room at that rate. We’d sometimes do it if someone was broke down, homeless, too drunk and the cops asked for a favor...and we’d ask all involved not to tell anyone about it.

If we could theoretically have sold every room, every night, 365 days a year...we would have probably been slightly profitable at $40/night, even putting them in the computer, as long as mine are TPW’s. That refers to the industry term REVPAR, which means, “Revenue per available room.” Of course, our REVPAR was actually higher than this, we did not sell out every night of the year and we were more than minimally profitable.



Thank you, I would have guessed between $20 and $25. I would assume the cleaning cost would be the largest part of that expense. If you put out a "free" continental breakfast I would guess that would be the next biggest expense.
Living longer does not always infer +EV
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 122
  • Posts: 12715
July 29th, 2020 at 7:37:39 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

Thank you, I would have guessed between $20 and $25. I would assume the cleaning cost would be the largest part of that expense. If you put out a "free" continental breakfast I would guess that would be the next biggest expense.



You’re welcome! You would have guessed correctly! I’d put the usage of electric, water and amenities over continental breakfast for the second greatest expense associated with the rental, in terms of direct costs. It’s honestly pretty close, though, and the guest might not use very much of any of those things. I guess breakfast could exceed if they really loaded up, but we offered the bare minimum that the franchise would permit in the cheapest possible way.
Vultures can't be choosers.
MDawg
MDawg
Joined: Sep 27, 2018
  • Threads: 15
  • Posts: 1002
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146
July 29th, 2020 at 7:39:35 PM permalink
Quote: Joeman

we call it the "Hotwire Room." As in, "Yeah, they stuck us in the Hotwire Room," which meant that it was right next to the elevator, or at the very end of the corridor facing the interstate, or oddly shaped/smaller, etc.


It's always a delicate balancing act between being away from the elevator, on a very high floor, on the "right" side of the building for the best view, and getting the type of room or suite you want. And still then sometimes they come back with "that's where all of the suites of that type are located." Or you get everything you think you want and end up in the room next to the screaming infant.

For example at Encore, all of the parlor suites face the golf course - no Strip view.

And at Cosmo, all of the Terrace Suites are located relatively close to the elevator hallway.

The list of "quirks," as in - you want this, well then you have to put up with or sacrifice this - go on and on for many if not most hotels worldwide.
I tell you it’s wonderful to be here, man. I don’t give a damn who wins or loses. It’s just wonderful to be here with you people.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 122
  • Posts: 12715
Thanks for this post from:
drmario
July 29th, 2020 at 7:57:37 PM permalink
Quote: MDawg

It's always a delicate balancing act between being away from the elevator, on a very high floor, on the "right" side of the building for the best view, and getting the type of room or suite you want. And still then sometimes they come back with "that's where all of the suites of that type are located." Or you get everything you think you want and end up in the room next to the screaming infant.

For example at Encore, all of the parlor suites face the golf course - no Strip view.

And at Cosmo, all of the Terrace Suites are located relatively close to the elevator hallway.

The list of "quirks," as in - you want this, well then you have to put up with or sacrifice this - go on and on for many if not most hotels worldwide.



In your first paragraph, that’s often actually true and was true for us.

On the second and third floors, if you made a left off of the elevator, that’s where all of the rooms with two queen beds were located. If you made a right, Queen suites would be on the left side of the halls with the different types (Jacuzzi or no Jacuzzi) of king suites on the right. The, “Singles,” which had just one queen bed and no frills, were right across from the elevator—three per floor.

Smoking was the entire third floor and no other floor had smoking rooms.

The first floor was basically the same, except there were no jacuzzi rooms and rooms with two queen beds were on both sides of the hall. The four accessible rooms (two single queens, a king suite and a two queen room) were also on the first floor. That floor also had one two queen suite.

There were also three king rooms that were not suites in the hotel. Two of these were smoking rooms and were actually just modified two queen rooms (same thing, but with a king bed and recliner-rocker and table instead) because we simply did not need so many QQS rooms. The other was the room closest to the front desk, which was often used by myself or the owner. If there was a blizzard, or something, and other employees could not make it in, then I’d stay on the property until the weather abated. That only happened two or three times, though one time was for four days. Mostly, the owner hung out in there when he was on the property, though he did not typically stay overnight.
Vultures can't be choosers.
drmario
drmario
Joined: Nov 21, 2011
  • Threads: 2
  • Posts: 13
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146
July 29th, 2020 at 8:13:42 PM permalink
Mission, You said your franchise had a loyalty points program. How did points stays get “handled”? I assume the franchise reimburses the franchise in some fashion. Was there any similar handling of points booking customers?

  • Jump to: