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1 vote (8.33%)
8 votes (66.66%)
3 votes (25%)

12 members have voted

AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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March 1st, 2012 at 6:36:56 PM permalink
As some of you know from my other question, in the last 60 hours I got laid off of one job due to slowing business conditions and then hired to another because they are hitting a boom mode. This got me to thinking about being employed at a place where things are just collapsing. Some background.

In January the company had a record month. We all got nice, logoed coats and some of us were given boxes to pack our stuff in because the plan was to move around the offices due to planned expansion. Several training calsses for new hires were planned and all was well. Three weeks later the major customer of the company said that they were "exploring options for 2013 and beyond" which was newspeak for "we are drilling less and need to spend less when we do." A week before the big day they said, "don't worry, there is still enough work for now." Then they said they were looking at employment levels.

So in 3 weeks we went from a record month to layoffs. I joked (I have developed gallows humor) that I didn't need them to find me a box to pack my stuff since I "still had the one for the office expansion move that they gave me last week." I don't know how many layoffs there were. I may be able to ask if I see some former-fellow-employees at the courthouse next week, unless they were laid off as well.

Anyhoo, many of us have been in this situation. But what do you think is better: to be the first group to go or to weather the storm. I know it can vary depending on your age and how sweet your old gig was. My thought is anytime this kind of thing starts the "survivors" eventually are let go at a rate of 90% or more, room for advancement during the crisis is nill and so are all the other "extras." (eg: few raises, no Christmas Party or other nice stuff.) By sticking around you might end up as the "lucky" employees at Eastman Kodak who will never get the good deal earlier exiles got. OTOH, if you do survive you are going to be at the top of the food chain *if* things get better.

What say you all? Have you ever faced this kind of thing?
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
weaselman
weaselman
Joined: Jul 11, 2010
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March 1st, 2012 at 6:47:09 PM permalink
If you survive the first wave, start looking for a new job right away. The best thing that can happen is that you find it right around the time you are ousted, and get a sweet severance package (and, maybe, a nice unemployment-paid vacation) in addition to the sign up bonus. But if you get a decent offer while still employed, accept it, and move on.
3 weeks from expansion plans to layoffs :-/ It looks like your old company was really really badly mismanaged. You are better off out of there.
"When two people always agree one of them is unnecessary"
Slowride
Slowride
Joined: Jan 22, 2010
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March 1st, 2012 at 7:00:04 PM permalink
Been there done this, I was on the third round and IT SU_KED.

We got less of a payout than the first and second groups.
First and second groups got 1 months pay for every yr. of service, by the time we were
given the boot it was down to 1 months pay for every 2 yrs. service.

Also the job market was drying up.
Never underestimate the power of human stupidity.....Lazarus Long
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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March 1st, 2012 at 7:22:28 PM permalink
Never wait for it to be "rats deserting a sinking ship". If you do that, you become just one of the faceless fools who waited too long turning a blind eye to the truth and who had no friends to tip you to what was really happening.

Being the first rat to leave is best or at least amongst that first wave.

It doesn't really matter too much who saw or didn't see what was coming or what the real cause was: something happened, its critical, ... get out. There no extra points for loyalty. There is just the tar of being one of the unlucky fools plodding away when everyone else is leaving. The last one gets to turn out the lights... but by that time, he might as well turn out the lights on his career too. Its been over for weeks.
98Clubs
98Clubs
Joined: Jun 3, 2010
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March 4th, 2012 at 11:58:19 PM permalink
I've been both, first and one of the last. First got me a new job, last made me wait 9 months.
Some people need to reimagine their thinking.
odiousgambit
odiousgambit
Joined: Nov 9, 2009
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March 5th, 2012 at 12:22:18 AM permalink
I have been in both situations. Generally I favor sticking to one job as much as possible, it doesnt look good on your resume to be going from place to place. However, my last experience with all this has suggested it is a bad idea. What a guy really needs is a crystal ball.
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder
Paigowdan
Paigowdan
Joined: Apr 28, 2010
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March 5th, 2012 at 1:09:00 AM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

Never wait for it to be "rats deserting a sinking ship". If you do that, you become just one of the faceless fools who waited too long turning a blind eye to the truth and who had no friends to tip you to what was really happening.


An interesting seafaring omen is when you are boarding a ship for a voyage, and you see the galley cats/rodents running off the ship on the plank, something is up and you may want to re-think your trip.
Last out, last back in the game...
Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes - Henry David Thoreau. Like Dealers' uniforms - Dan.
weaselman
weaselman
Joined: Jul 11, 2010
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March 5th, 2012 at 5:19:15 AM permalink
Quote: odiousgambit

Generally I favor sticking to one job as much as possible, it doesnt look good on your resume to be going from place to place.


It's a myth. What does not look good is the extremes. If you stay at one place for less than 8 months, you are better off not mentioning it in your resume at all. If you stay longer than 5-6 years ... you are screwed pretty badly too.
"When two people always agree one of them is unnecessary"
boymimbo
boymimbo
Joined: Nov 12, 2009
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March 5th, 2012 at 6:40:16 AM permalink
Staying at one place for a long time is not bad -- you just have to have some great references and a great reason for leaving, but it's always much, much, better to be employed when looking for new work.
----- You want the truth! You can't handle the truth!
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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March 5th, 2012 at 6:45:04 AM permalink
Quote: weaselman

It's a myth. What does not look good is the extremes. If you stay at one place for less than 8 months, you are better off not mentioning it in your resume at all. If you stay longer than 5-6 years ... you are screwed pretty badly too.



I have to really agree here. While it was different cities and I am now far better at looking, when I seperated from a 7.5 year job my reception was much worse then when I have now left a series of 1.5 year jobs. People say "why did you leave after so long?" Then know something happened, and they know you will take longer to adapt to new procedure.

OTOH, I am now (I feel) being viewed as a "project guy" and can rightly say I come onboard for a project and move on after it is done. I am changing my LinkedIn profile title to reflect freelance/project/somethingorother to reflect this, just working on the wording.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others

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