Poll

4 votes (26.66%)
3 votes (20%)
1 vote (6.66%)
1 vote (6.66%)
No votes (0%)
3 votes (20%)
1 vote (6.66%)
1 vote (6.66%)
1 vote (6.66%)
No votes (0%)

15 members have voted

OnceDear
Administrator
OnceDear
Joined: Jun 1, 2014
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July 15th, 2018 at 1:49:01 PM permalink
Quote: terapined

Curious What insurance you have
Or
Do you gamble and drive with no insurance

I go with Geico

Is it legal and technically possible to drive with no insurance in the US?

I can't vote in the poll as, here in the UK it is pretty simple: If you have a registered car, and it's not continuously insured for unlimited 3rd party damages, it triggers automatic prosecution that can result in the car getting confiscated and crushed... And criminal prosecution. Uninsured vehicles are routinely trapped in ANRP (automatic number plate recognition) checks.

There is no requirement for me to cover damage or injury to my own car or to myself. But, if I'm injured and it's totally my own fault and I have no cover, then my medical 'needs' are met by our 'free National Health service' That covers needs rather than wishes and is paid for by a national income tax ' National insurance' which also pays for all state benefits and state pension.
Take care out there. Spare a thought for the newly poor who were happy in their world just a few days ago, but whose whole way of life just collapsed..
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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July 15th, 2018 at 2:01:18 PM permalink
Quote: OnceDear

can result in the car getting confiscated and crushed...



Wouldn't make more economic sense to just sell it off?
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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July 15th, 2018 at 2:02:30 PM permalink
It's not legal to drive a car without insurance, or a license, or the car being registered, but that doesn't stop a lot of people.
I've seen estimates that put the percentage of cars on the road without insurance at around 15%.
It's my understanding that people with good medical coverage can skip paying the uninsured driver rider as it is duplicate coverage.
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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July 15th, 2018 at 2:03:48 PM permalink
Quote: OnceDear

Is it legal and technically possible to drive with no insurance in the US?

I can't vote in the poll as, here in the UK it is pretty simple: If you have a registered car, and it's not continuously insured for unlimited 3rd party damages, it triggers automatic prosecution that can result in the car getting confiscated and crushed... And criminal prosecution. Uninsured vehicles are routinely trapped in ANRP (automatic number plate recognition) checks.

There is no requirement for me to cover damage or injury to my own car or to myself. But, if I'm injured and it's totally my own fault and I have no cover, then my medical 'needs' are met by our 'free National Health service' That covers needs rather than wishes and is paid for by a national income tax ' National insurance' which also pays for all state benefits and state pension.


I'm not sure, but don't think you need insurance specifically. Can get bonded. Can get neither if you're financially responsible, meaning you have enough money to take care of all damages. That's the gist.
In the land of the blind, the man with one eye is the care taker. Hold my beer.
OnceDear
Administrator
OnceDear
Joined: Jun 1, 2014
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July 15th, 2018 at 2:08:24 PM permalink
Quote: rxwine

Wouldn't make more economic sense to just sell it off?

Yes. It's pretty stupid IMHO. As an environmentalist, I'd prefer to see confiscated cars kept in service. I think it's seen as a greater deterrent. Don't insure the BMW and get your pride and joy crushed and get criminally prosecuted too for good measure.
Take care out there. Spare a thought for the newly poor who were happy in their world just a few days ago, but whose whole way of life just collapsed..
Gandler
Gandler
Joined: Jan 27, 2014
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July 15th, 2018 at 2:33:23 PM permalink
Quote: OnceDear

Is it legal and technically possible to drive with no insurance in the US?



Its not legal. Many states now require you to have auto insurance before they will grant a registration. And, if you do not have a current registration your car will not last long. Even if your car does not get driven and sits on your driveway or yard it will eventually be detected and towed. The only way its legal to have an unregistered vehicle is if its in a secure garage (interior).

-Also police generally ask for proof of insurance on just about every traffic stop. -
ams288
ams288
Joined: Sep 26, 2012
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July 15th, 2018 at 3:46:55 PM permalink
I have Progressive. I used to have Nationwide but they tried to raise my rates a couple years ago and I realized I could save over $1000 a year with Progressive.

Michigan has some of the highest auto insurance rates in the country because we are a “no fault” state. What a racket. When I first moved here from Ohio I kept my Ohio insurance/drivers license for as long as I could.
Eater of Worlds
TigerWu
TigerWu
Joined: May 23, 2016
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July 15th, 2018 at 6:30:46 PM permalink
I have USAA because it was way cheaper than Geico.

Don't ever get a mortgage through USAA, though. Their mortgage department sucks.
Boz
Boz
Joined: Sep 22, 2011
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July 15th, 2018 at 6:49:43 PM permalink
I have Progressive in PA where I live and recently purchased my first vehicle in Florida and had to determine how I wanted to handle it. Options were to Register it in PA and put it on my current policy which was the cheapest insurance option. But then I would have to drive it back to PA every year to get it inspected. As Florida has no inspection laws, I could register and leave it there, but I would have to buy a separate insurance policy.

I found out Florida rates are much higher due to high rates of accidents and car theft.

In the end I opened a 2nd Progressive policy in Florida and I am paying about 60% of my PA total for 3 cars for just 1 in Florida. All have the same coverage levels so it’s an equal comparison.

Overall I’m very happy with Progressive from a pricing standpoint.
gamerfreak
gamerfreak 
Joined: Dec 28, 2014
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July 15th, 2018 at 7:15:23 PM permalink
Quote: Boz

I found out Florida rates are much higher due to high rates of accidents and car theft.


I’m also in PA and have insurance with Travelers. My premiums are less than $600/yr, but I don’t have collision.

PA rates are so low, in part, because of our limited tort statutes.

For those that aren’t aware, in Pennsylvania you can choose between a “Full Tort” and “Limited Tort” insurance policies. If you have a limited tort policy, you cannot sue in civil court for “pain and suffering” after an accident. Since limited tort policies are significantly cheaper, most people do not get full tort coverage, and as a result there are far less civil lawsuits after an accident, which makes everyone’s premiums cheaper.

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