billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 175
  • Posts: 9771
May 13th, 2020 at 5:27:08 PM permalink
I drove a Good Humour truck one summer, 1986 or 87. The markup wasn't that great. I'd sneak in some Good Humour I'd buy from the supermarket when it was on sale. At the time, most bars sold for75 cents and I'd pay 50% upfront to 70% if I paid after I sold them.
They also held back 10% of sales as a deposit on the truck. Rent was $200 a week rain or shine. It was fun but barely profitable. If I worked five days, I'd clear about $250 a week. I'd work a sixth day every couple of weeks but some guys worked seven days a week for the whole summer. If you finished your contract you'd get your 10% of sales back, which was a great going away bonus.
Venthus
Venthus
Joined: Dec 10, 2012
  • Threads: 23
  • Posts: 1104
May 13th, 2020 at 5:45:46 PM permalink
Quote: billryan

I drove a Good Humour truck one summer, 1986 or 87. The markup wasn't that great. I'd sneak in some Good Humour I'd buy from the supermarket when it was on sale. At the time, most bars sold for75 cents and I'd pay 50% upfront to 70% if I paid after I sold them.
They also held back 10% of sales as a deposit on the truck. Rent was $200 a week rain or shine. It was fun but barely profitable. If I worked five days, I'd clear about $250 a week. I'd work a sixth day every couple of weeks but some guys worked seven days a week for the whole summer. If you finished your contract you'd get your 10% of sales back, which was a great going away bonus.



So if I understand the numbers right, you'd make something like 700 in sales each 5-day week,they'd take about 650, yielding about 50/wk or 10/day in profit. If you finished out the contract, you'd end up with 10% of the sales back, making about 120/week, pulling the equivalent of 24$/day. If you did 7 days a week with the same averages, you'd yield 20.5/day and 34.5/day if you finished off the contract.

That actually doesn't come across as downright awful for something like a high school job in the 80s... though I'm also thinking you're not doing 8-hours a day. Unfortunately, I also suspect a lot of people working it aren't doing it as a high school gig either.
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 175
  • Posts: 9771
May 13th, 2020 at 6:41:49 PM permalink
No, those numbers are way off.
I'm possibly not remembering them correctly. I know if you worked five days, it was a bit above the minimum wage but the sixth day was all gravy.
They held ten percent of purchases, not sales so if you bought $100 worth of ice cream you paid $110 for it which was about $50 a week. After the season, you'd get 1,000-1500 back.
The guys who owned their own truck could do much better but were responsible for wear and tear plus insurance. At the time, you could buy an old 1965-69 truck for about $2500. One of my friends bought a truck, thinking he would work pt when he retired. One thing lead to another and he never did, but the market skyrocketed and he sold the truck for about $20,000 maybe fifteen years later.
BedWetterBetter
BedWetterBetter
Joined: Oct 20, 2012
  • Threads: 33
  • Posts: 606
May 14th, 2020 at 12:18:59 AM permalink
Quote: DRich

I don't consider the ice cream guy a scam. He is selling a product that you can either choose to buy or not. Yes he has a big markup but I don't think that is a scam.



I don't know, I would say playing a loud, obnoxious jingle up and down every street while targeting schools and playgrounds for customers who can't drive to buy the product is kind of scummy. If they were really "helping the kids" or providing them a service, they would charge the same or less than stores, no?

Granted, the kids are just taking money from their parents but it still reeks of opportunism at its worst.
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
  • Threads: 209
  • Posts: 8000
May 14th, 2020 at 12:45:33 AM permalink
Quote: BedWetterBetter

I don't know, I would say playing a loud, obnoxious jingle up and down every street while targeting schools and playgrounds for customers who can't drive to buy the product is kind of scummy. If they were really "helping the kids" or providing them a service, they would charge the same or less than stores, no?

Granted, the kids are just taking money from their parents but it still reeks of opportunism at its worst.

You're a pessimist. Those trucks don't sit in front of your house all day until you come out and buy something. Bill Ryan was just talking about how he had to basically steal from his business partners to make ends meet and you're complaining these people aren't working for GD FREE? When I was a kid, we were only allowed ice cream a few times a year max and all the other times the truck just kept driving by the house. I assume you're willing to drive around at your expense 50 hours a week providing a service PEOPLE WANT? If I have a choice between going to the nearest gas station, RT 15 minutes, 3 miles and having someone bring it to me for $2-5, I'd pay. Great f***** deal IMO.
In the land of the blind, the man with one eye is the care taker. Hold my beer.
Marcusclark66
Marcusclark66
Joined: Mar 26, 2020
  • Threads: 2
  • Posts: 99
May 14th, 2020 at 4:34:21 AM permalink
Quote: billryan

I drove a Good Humour truck one summer, 1986 or 87. The markup wasn't that great. I'd sneak in some Good Humour I'd buy from the supermarket when it was on sale. At the time, most bars sold for75 cents and I'd pay 50% upfront to 70% if I paid after I sold them.
They also held back 10% of sales as a deposit on the truck. Rent was $200 a week rain or shine. It was fun but barely profitable. If I worked five days, I'd clear about $250 a week. I'd work a sixth day every couple of weeks but some guys worked seven days a week for the whole summer. If you finished your contract you'd get your 10% of sales back, which was a great going away bonus.



My neighbor has a Schwan's truck gig, similar to your position you had with Good Humor. I think their ice cream is pretty good and he tells me he's making about $2,000 on an average week after all expenses, he works six days a week and he's gone about 12 hours a day but he says he definitely enjoys what he's doing and he's making the most money he's ever made, he's even got a college education and he came out of some type of corporate job a few years ago. LoL, no jeopardy of losing what he's doing now best thing about it.
TDVegas
TDVegas
Joined: Oct 30, 2018
  • Threads: 0
  • Posts: 589
May 14th, 2020 at 5:12:03 AM permalink
Living in Vegas for a while...my street smarts quotient rose substantially. Ground zero for every scam artist and scam known to man. Also every “story” ever told to get money.

If I hear “excuse me, sir”....in the distance, I know they want money. Every time. I’ve learned to not hear it anymore.

The scam artists are working overtime and the scams and operations get more sophisticated every day. Be careful. If you are getting called, getting approached, getting an email or text ....hang on tight to your wallet.

Caller ID’s getting spoofed. Latest was Apple. Emails that look totally official from your bank. Text messages that indicate your credit card has been compromised.

You really need to stay sharp. Even more so now.

Btw, I have no issue with the ice cream man.
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 175
  • Posts: 9771
May 14th, 2020 at 10:49:26 AM permalink
Quote: Marcusclark66

My neighbor has a Schwan's truck gig, similar to your position you had with Good Humor. I think their ice cream is pretty good and he tells me he's making about $2,000 on an average week after all expenses, he works six days a week and he's gone about 12 hours a day but he says he definitely enjoys what he's doing and he's making the most money he's ever made, he's even got a college education and he came out of some type of corporate job a few years ago. LoL, no jeopardy of losing what he's doing now best thing about it.



The trick seemed to be knowing your route. That is the advantage the vets have over the rookies and why there is such a huge turnover of new drivers. By August, I knew which blocks were great and which to avoid. You also learn that few parents buy ice cream for their kids after 4 PM so instead of trawling streets, you find a park or place that kids hang out. Parking in front of the gyms was pretty good. After dinner, it starts all over again. There were a few days when I didn't have all day and would only hit the super-premium spots, and I'd make 66% of my average in a couple of hours. I had the old fashioned pickup type truck so I couldn't sell soda or candy. Guys with step-vans could sell those and baseball cards, balloons, even hot dogs, but the company didn't rent vans.
Of course, by the time you figure it out, school starts, and old patterns are disrupted. When school started, I'd park right in front of this high school and did well until an administrator told me I couldn't be within 500 feet of the school.
I know nothing about today's conditions but back then I gave some thought to buying a truck an doing it fulltime. Had I had a partner willing to work some of the days, I think it would have been a great investment.
One guy with his own truck told me he collected unemployment 20 weeks every year and wintered in Florida but didn't explain how he did it.
TomG
TomG
Joined: Sep 26, 2010
  • Threads: 13
  • Posts: 2081
Thanks for this post from:
onenickelmiracle
May 14th, 2020 at 2:31:10 PM permalink
Quote: BedWetterBetter

I always thought Ice Cream men were a big scam, buying frozen popsicles in bulk at 20-25 cents a bar and selling them from $2-$3 a pop. As a kid, I probably paid them $50 for $5 worth of ice cream over all.



By telling us what the markup is, you're showing how transparent it is, which means it is not a scam. Anyone who buys that stuff does so with full knowledge of what they're getting. We all know we're paying 25-cents for ice cream and $4 for convenience. If someone doesn't think that's a good value they'll simply never eat ice cream that comes from anywhere other than the grocery store. Bad value does not equal a scam. A scam requires some combination of dishonesty, asymmetric information, and a predatory manner. An ice cream truck at a park or beach doesn't come close to fitting any of that.
Gandler
Gandler
Joined: Jan 27, 2014
  • Threads: 31
  • Posts: 1457
May 14th, 2020 at 6:28:47 PM permalink
Quote: BedWetterBetter

With the job market in a state of flux, you had to know the greedy, low life scammers would find another angle.

Preying on people's worries of unemployment and fear of contamination, the scam now involves selling COVID preventative essential oils from your doorstep. From the one phone call I received on this matter, it sounds like a call center in the Philippines or Thailand, and they are pushing essential oils that will counteract COVID symptoms. Of course, this is just scented water with no proven healing or curative factors and using people's desperation & panic to bilk them out of their money.

There is also the Work from Home Scam, where you are supposedly a shipping clerk for an office supply company. But once you buy and ship the office supplies requested, the "reimbursement check" suddenly bounces and leaves you in the red.

I also encountered many years ago, when I worked in NYC, a scam that involved Security Guard job placement assistance. This one, you would actually interview and meet the scumbags face to face while they chat you up about a starting pay rate of $22/hr. and immediate jobs hiring. Only to demand $199 for training classes, where they show videos or movies, give you a security guard certificate printed on Loose leaf paper and then tell you go out and find your own way. I remember smelling a rat when I asked the guy's name over the phone and he said Mr. White. Did a quick search online and saw hundreds of complaints about the company and the scam itself.

One can only hope society doesn't stoop any lower once businesses open, but these rats always come out when things are at their worst.




Both of these are long running schemes. They have peppered Craigslist for years. Look at any CL region and you will find the same Shipping Clerk and Security Officer postings.... Another common one is being paid to put ads on your personal vehicle.

I would imagine the only difference is now people are more desperate and likley to fall for it.

  • Jump to: