darkoz
darkoz
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October 23rd, 2015 at 1:27:20 PM permalink
England has five minutes less commercials (at least they did in the nineties and early 2000's.)

My collections of Highlander and Farscape claim to be with five minutes of footage not seen in the US due to airtime allotments.

The missing stuff is usually innocuous so you aren't affected by missing plot. Some comical diatribe or a romantic scene but less commercials/more show in England.
For Whom the bus tolls; The bus tolls for thee
EvenBob
EvenBob
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October 23rd, 2015 at 1:59:27 PM permalink
Quote: darkoz

but less commercials/more show in England.



Yet some American shows were huge hits
in England, and it's never the other way
round. Happy Days, Friends, Frasier, Sopranos,
West Wing, and many others, were mega
hits in England. No Brit show has ever been
big here.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
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October 23rd, 2015 at 2:25:58 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Yet some American shows were huge hits
in England, and it's never the other way
round. Happy Days, Friends, Frasier, Sopranos,
West Wing, and many others, were mega
hits in England. No Brit show has ever been
big here.



Two that I would say were big hits from England were Upstairs, Downstairs and Downton Abbey. There was also a large (mostly female) following for AbFab (Absolutely Fabulous) and there was another about a Mrs. Buckett that my ex loved, along with all his buddies (can't remember the name of it).

I would say, though, the biggest by far was Monty Python. Perhaps Benny Hill, in its time, as well. And there's a large fan base for Doctor Who, has been for 40 years.

None of them had Nielsens like MASH, or Friends, or Seinfeld, but all of them had millions of regular viewers.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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October 23rd, 2015 at 3:13:11 PM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

Two that I would say were big hits from England were Upstairs, Downstairs and Downton Abbey.



The average American viewer has neither
seen nor probably heard of either one.
I have not seen them and wouldn't even
know where to find them. On the other
hand, Happy Days and Dallas and Frasier
were just as big in England as they were
here. That's the difference.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
AlanMendelson
AlanMendelson
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October 23rd, 2015 at 3:34:59 PM permalink
There are no longer Federal Communications Commission limits on the number of commercials in a half hour. This is why there are now half hour TV Infomercials.

There used to be a limit of only 8 minutes of commercials per half hour.
darkoz
darkoz
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October 23rd, 2015 at 4:06:09 PM permalink
Actually several English shows came over however American studios were too stuck up to believe Americans would watch or understand the accents, so they re-did the shows with American actors.

Plus the biggest British show in the last two decades was probably Idol and X-Factor and Britain's Got Talent and those definitely have come over here, albeit in their Americanized versions.
For Whom the bus tolls; The bus tolls for thee
darkoz
darkoz
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October 23rd, 2015 at 4:12:12 PM permalink
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_American_television_series_based_on_British_television_series

While the Brit shows rarely get imported directly here anymore, quite a few were successfully imported in the sixties.

Danger Man (retitled secret Agent Man) and the Prisoner.

The Avengers.

The Saint

And as mentioned, Dr. Who and Monty Python in the seventies are all examples of shows where the originals were broadcast as opposed to Americanized remakes.
For Whom the bus tolls; The bus tolls for thee
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
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October 23rd, 2015 at 4:13:51 PM permalink
The English pay a TV license fee that helps stations with their bottom lines, (and presumably cuts down the number of ads).

I enjoyed "Top Gear", and even the American version a little less. Perhaps the most well known British import has got to be "Antiques Roadshow". Even EB has got to know and love that show.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
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October 23rd, 2015 at 4:16:11 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

The average American viewer has neither
seen nor probably heard of either one.
I have not seen them and wouldn't even
know where to find them. On the other
hand, Happy Days and Dallas and Frasier
were just as big in England as they were
here. That's the difference.

Most everyone not living in a box has heard of Downtown Abbey. There was a time that's all everyone could talk about.
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
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October 23rd, 2015 at 4:30:56 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Yet some American shows were huge hits
in England, and it's never the other way
round. Happy Days, Friends, Frasier, Sopranos,
West Wing, and many others, were mega
hits in England. No Brit show has ever been
big here.



Brit shows "look" like Brit shows so they have to be re-tooled and shot in the USA. They then can be shown in other overseas markets. "All in the Family," "Sanford and Son," "The Office," and "Shark Tank" are just a few that came from Brit shows. The USA market is large enough to make it worthwhile to make a local franchise. Otherwise you have to hear Brit accents that make it seem foreign.
Tolerance is the virtue of believing in nothing

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