CrystalMath
CrystalMath
Joined: May 10, 2011
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July 15th, 2020 at 11:43:40 AM permalink
I was given an IQ test in elementary school, but they never gave me the results. It was a big deal trying to figure out why I was a bad kid and stealing stuff.

My friend took the test too. About 2 weeks later, the principal came to talk to me and said “now we know you’re not stupid...”. My friend got a talk that day about how stealing is bad.
I heart Crystal Math.
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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unJonCrystalMath
July 15th, 2020 at 12:32:40 PM permalink
I was tested at 75 but my mom seduced the superintendent to get me into normal schools. She sure does care about my education.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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July 15th, 2020 at 9:25:55 PM permalink
I've read that IQ tests are all wonky,
they don't mean very much. For
instance Isaac Asimov was obviously
a genius. At one point he had over
200 books in print at once. He could
write a science book in 10 hours.
Yet he was very hard to test and get
a correct result. They finally concluded
his IQ was so far off the charts there
was no test for him. There was
nobody smart enough to write the
test. Asimov was vice president of
Mensa, but had few good things to
say about it. He considered himself
very smart in some ways and dumb
as a rock in others.

"IQ isn't everything, but it isn't nothing either." Isaac Asimov
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Minty
Minty
Joined: Jan 23, 2015
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AxelWolf
July 15th, 2020 at 11:53:16 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I've read that IQ tests are all wonky,
they don't mean very much. For
instance Isaac Asimov was obviously
a genius. At one point he had over
200 books in print at once. He could
write a science book in 10 hours.
Yet he was very hard to test and get
a correct result. They finally concluded
his IQ was so far off the charts there
was no test for him. There was
nobody smart enough to write the
test. Asimov was vice president of
Mensa, but had few good things to
say about it. He considered himself
very smart in some ways and dumb
as a rock in others.

"IQ isn't everything, but it isn't nothing either." Isaac Asimov



I've heard a number of times that emotional intelligence is more important to a person's success than intelligence.
"Just because I'm not doing anything illegal, doesn't mean I won't have to defend myself someday." -Chip Reese
100xOdds
100xOdds
Joined: Feb 5, 2012
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onenickelmiracle
July 16th, 2020 at 12:29:15 PM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

I was tested at 75 but my mom seduced the superintendent to get me into normal schools. She sure does care about my education.

ok Forrest. :)
Craps is paradise (Pair of dice). Lets hear it for the SpeedCount Mathletes :)
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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onenickelmiracle
July 16th, 2020 at 12:31:45 PM permalink
Quote: Minty

I've heard a number of times that emotional intelligence is more important to a person's success than intelligence.



Asimov was a weirdo. If his wife
was one minute late getting home,
he'd fall apart with stress and worry.
He'd have panic attacks that she
got hit by a bus or a falling piano.
He had a bad rep as a 'handsy' guy
at parties and gatherings. He was
always copping feels and stroking
the butts of women. His wife said
she had spoken to him about it
many times, and he said he tried
to control it but always failed.
That kind of stuff is frightening,
so smart yet he had no impulse
control.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
smoothgrh
smoothgrh
Joined: Oct 26, 2011
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July 18th, 2020 at 9:52:54 AM permalink
In the Wizard’s latest newsletter, he mentioned this example Mensa test question:

It takes six machines eight hours to produce ten units. How many units can one machine make in half an hour?

My friend and I got the same answer; he got 10/96 and I got .104 — that’s correct, right?
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
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July 18th, 2020 at 10:19:30 AM permalink
Quote: smoothgrh

In the Wizard’s latest newsletter, he mentioned this example Mensa test question:

It takes six machines eight hours to produce ten units. How many units can one machine make in half an hour?

My friend and I got the same answer; he got 10/96 and I got .104 — that’s correct, right?



I'd just reverse engineer it, personally.

You get a total production of ten units in sixteen half hours, so first:

10/16 = 0.625

You divide that by six machines, and: .625/6 = 0.10416666667

So, we agree on that part.

Although, I don't trust it not to be a trick question with the answer actually just being zero. Perhaps they would say it's not possible to have less than one unit. For a hypothetical, if the unit is a car...how do you quantify a percentage of a car? It would also assume that all parts of the car are considered equal, which is untrue, for obvious reasons.

Also, answering the question the obvious way assumes that all six machines aren't necessary for one complete unit. As in, the machines might need to work together to produce a unit rather than separately, in which event, one machine could never make an entire unit in the first place. If the machines do work together, then they could theoretically not have uniform output rates.

So, I'm either going to say, '0,' or, 'More information needed,' unless it's multiple choice.
Vultures can't be choosers.
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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July 18th, 2020 at 11:00:15 AM permalink
Quote: Minty

I've heard a number of times that emotional intelligence is more important to a person's success than intelligence.



I imagine much of that chatter comes from people who didn't score as high as they anticipated they would. I took some sort of Mensa test in college and of about forty people one passed it. I and a few others were encouraged to take it again, which gave me the impression we were close. My three male cousins were all in Mensa and for two of them, that would be pretty much all they accomplished in their lives.
I had a customer in a bar I bought who was called The Professor. Everyone said he was a genius but I never quite saw it. He died a few years later and in his obit it said he graduated HS at 12, and had two PHDs by 25. While working at Bell Labs he created something in his spare time that he sold to them and retired early. It said he had written a dozen textbooks for college-level math courses. I heard his children were shocked at the size of his estate. Evidently he was pretty good at picking stocks.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
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July 18th, 2020 at 11:12:23 AM permalink
Quote: billryan

I imagine much of that chatter comes from people who didn't score as high as they anticipated they would. I took some sort of Mensa test in college and of about forty people one passed it. I and a few others were encouraged to take it again, which gave me the impression we were close. My three male cousins were all in Mensa and for two of them, that would be pretty much all they accomplished in their lives.



(Quote clipped, relevance)

That's basically how I feel about it. Getting into Mensa would make me no less intellectually underwhelming, or less underwhelming, in general, so I really don't see the point. I imagine that I would have a realistic probability of success, but I really don't see what being in Mensa would do for me other than being able to say that I'm in Mensa...which isn't something I'd run around advertising in the first place.

I also think it would be something of a worst house in a great neighborhood situation, in the sense that I'd probably be one of the dumbest members Mensa would have. I'd be like the third-string QB equivalent, or maybe even practice roster.
Vultures can't be choosers.

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