Poll

1 vote (1.17%)
1 vote (1.17%)
7 votes (8.23%)
7 votes (8.23%)
9 votes (10.58%)
11 votes (12.94%)
9 votes (10.58%)
9 votes (10.58%)
12 votes (14.11%)
19 votes (22.35%)

85 members have voted

AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
  • Threads: 147
  • Posts: 18300
February 20th, 2018 at 5:26:59 PM permalink
Quote: Lucca3927

I'm younger than I feel.

Older than I feel, mentally anyways.
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
toastcmu
toastcmu
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 17
  • Posts: 292
Thanks for this post from:
miplet
February 21st, 2018 at 5:02:55 AM permalink
Quote: miplet

Iím 38. Turn 39 on National Blackjack Day.



I thought I was the only one with a national blackjack day birthday. Will be 46.
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 175
  • Posts: 9747
Thanks for this post from:
TumblingBones
February 21st, 2018 at 5:06:45 AM permalink
I recently celebrated the twentieth anniversary of my thirty ninth birthday..
gamerfreak
gamerfreak
Joined: Dec 28, 2014
  • Threads: 48
  • Posts: 3107
February 21st, 2018 at 5:41:21 AM permalink
So what is going to happen to casinoís once the baby boomers start croaking en masse?

Will the next generation of geriatrics continue to shred their social security checks in penny slots?
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
Joined: Dec 25, 2016
  • Threads: 25
  • Posts: 393
Thanks for this post from:
AxelWolf
February 21st, 2018 at 6:01:49 AM permalink
Quote: gamerfreak

So what is going to happen to casinoís once the baby boomers start croaking en masse?

Will the next generation of geriatrics continue to shred their social security checks in penny slots?


My daughter is 26 and and enjoys playing craps occasionally but only visits the casinos with mom and dad because none of her peers are in to gambling. I'm not sure, however, that I buy in to this "millennials don't gamble" meme. When I was her/your age I had better things to do than sit in a casino and lose money (e.g., cross-country motorcycle trips, skiing, Grateful Dead concerts). Now I'm too old for that plus my wife would kill me if I bought another motorcycle so I find the craps table to be just about the right level of action for me.
Bottom line is it's not so much "millennials don't gamble" as folks in their 20s have always had more options to choose from than sitting in a casino. Just wait till their knees give out and then they will be re-filling those empty slot seats left by the deceased boomers.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
LuckyPhow
LuckyPhow
Joined: May 19, 2016
  • Threads: 51
  • Posts: 654
February 21st, 2018 at 7:52:42 AM permalink
Quote: Romes

What does "af" mean young sonny?? (just kidding - but I'd assume there are some people on here that genuinely don't know =P).



Amen to that!

When I joined WoV, there were so many TLAs (3-letter acronyms) that I had to start a list. It now fills 3 pages in a document file. Lots of abbreviations of casino names that Vegas players understand. AC players have their own specialty TLAs. Plus, there are many, MANY others that have inserted themselves into our day-to-day conversations.

It presents a big problem, imo. Not necessarily a problem "today," but a problem over the long term. For example, do younger computer users today still use the ever-popular "PLOS" TLA? It informed folks you had to log off quickly (or quickly switch to a different program) because of "parents looking over shoulder." I doubt folks use this much today, because smart phones allow users privacy they didn't have when using the family computer in the living room. With each passing year, I expect fewer folks will recall the meaning of PLOS, and it's just one example of many, MANY more.

But, today many folks are using TLAs less and less. Instead, they use emoji images to express every manner of thought, impression, and feeling. We used to call them emoticons. Today, some folks send emails or texts that contain ONLY emoji images. If our current technology trends continue, imo folks will quickly move on to something else and substitute the new, NEW thing for emoji images. In the years that follow, folks will forget -- and be unable to translate -- emoji meanings, so the message will become as understandable as Egyptian hieroglyphics.

I recall a long-ago cartoon involving a pre-Internet short-wave amateur radio hobbyist upset at a distant someone with whom he was communicating. The punch line was, "Take your QRX and put a lot of DX between here and your next QSL." How many of you understand the joke?


Here are the "answers":
QRX -- "Standing by" or "Do you want me to stand by (and wait for your reply)?"
DX -- Distance
QSL -- Acknowledgment you received my message. Short-wave radio listeners collected QSLs from foreign broadcasters, such as the BBC, Radio Moscow, Radio Quito (Ecuador), etc. The listener would report what was broadcast, clarity of signal, etc., and the broadcaster would mail a small certificate confirming you heard the program. Short-wave radio enthusiasts collected QSLs.

So, the cartoon character was telling someone to go somewhere far away and not come back. Search on "Amateur Radio Q-code" to see more...


Today, schools apparently no longer teach pupils how to write in script. Young folks, when required to sign their name, don't know what to do. (Happened recently to friends of mine. Child passed test for Driver License, had to sign name as it would appear on license, and just stared at parent while trying to figure out how to proceed.) So, a lot more "stuff" is going to be unreadable by coming generations. I can read the original text written for the Declaration of Independence, but only with difficulty. Same will be true with other script as "penmanship" skills continue to wane, until script becomes as readable to the average person as hieroglyphics.
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
Joined: Jun 22, 2011
  • Threads: 95
  • Posts: 4390
February 21st, 2018 at 9:32:36 AM permalink
Sure, you couldn't have asked this three weeks earlier, when I was in a lower age bracket...
gordonm888
gordonm888
Joined: Feb 18, 2015
  • Threads: 42
  • Posts: 2677
February 21st, 2018 at 10:41:07 AM permalink
Quote: LuckyPhow

. . . a lot more "stuff" is going to be unreadable by coming generations. I can read the original text written for the Declaration of Independence, but only with difficulty. Same will be true with other script as "penmanship" skills continue to wane, until script becomes as readable to the average person as hieroglyphics.



Schools used to teach Latin (and Greek) so that students could read ancient texts and literature. Not so much now. And if you've never tried to read Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales or works by Wm. Shakespeare or by Scottish authors (Like Sir Walter Scott) you would be surprised at how far the English language was from current day English. Some of those works are inaccessible today - unless your text has footnotes that decipher the Olde English.
So many better men, a few of them friends, were dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things lived on, and so did I.
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 3800
February 21st, 2018 at 11:26:53 AM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

Schools used to teach Latin (and Greek) so that students could read ancient texts and literature. Not so much now. And if you've never tried to read Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales or works by Wm. Shakespeare or by Scottish authors (Like Sir Walter Scott) you would be surprised at how far the English language was from current day English. Some of those works are inaccessible today - unless your text has footnotes that decipher the Olde English.



In college I had a writing professor (Mark Harris, who wrote Bang the Drum Slowly) who used Shakespeare to help us understand how to make our writing more rich. Shakespeare's plays were full of bawdy puns that simply don't make sense to us, but were uproarious to his audience. For example, in Hamlet, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, and Hamlet are discussing the king.

HAMLET: "The king is a thing..."
GUILDENSTERN: "A thing, my lord?"
HAMLET: "Of nothing. Bring me to him. "

The last line is often translated to modern English as "of nothing." So the line today simply means, "The king doesn't matter." But in Shakespeare's day, the actual line was, "...of little naught. Bring me to him." it was outrageous. "Thing" was slang for penis. So the line is a double entendre: the king doesn't matter, but also, he is impotent, and has a small penis!

Anyhow, I guess knowing that means I'm old, too.

63.
NO KILL I
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 175
  • Posts: 9747
February 21st, 2018 at 12:02:53 PM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

Schools used to teach Latin (and Greek) so that students could read ancient texts and literature. Not so much now. And if you've never tried to read Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales or works by Wm. Shakespeare or by Scottish authors (Like Sir Walter Scott) you would be surprised at how far the English language was from current day English. Some of those works are inaccessible today - unless your text has footnotes that decipher the Olde English.



That was before everything was easily available in ones native language. Schools also had less to teach back then. They could spend an hour a day on penmanship because they didn't teach computer science or a hundred other modern disciplines. My father( born in 1925) told me he didn't learn anything about the Civil War or later in US History. The Great War was discussed in a subject that seems like it would be Current Events. For some reason, a boy being educated in Brooklyn was expected to have a working knowledge of the English Royal Family and Russia was divided into two countries. Red Russia ( the area around Moscow) and White Russia( everything else). Manifest Destiny and The White Mans Burden were considered to be real, and race mixing was known to cause defective babies.
American authors were treated as a rung below English ones, and Paris was the center of the known universe.

  • Jump to: