CrystalMath
CrystalMath
Joined: May 10, 2011
  • Threads: 8
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November 4th, 2016 at 4:21:17 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

Memory chips are supposed to keep status for several days with on board power. The damage was so bad the fire supression system's battery back ups couldn't last until power was restored, so they emptied the joint. Does anyone know where Danny Ocean is? Best to keep an eye on him and his 10 friends...



When I was at GLI, the standard was for critical data to be stored on EEPROMS, which would hold the data indefinitely. Many games use flash or some other solid state storage now.
I heart Crystal Math.
CrystalMath
CrystalMath
Joined: May 10, 2011
  • Threads: 8
  • Posts: 1893
November 4th, 2016 at 4:21:17 PM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

Memory chips are supposed to keep status for several days with on board power. The damage was so bad the fire supression system's battery back ups couldn't last until power was restored, so they emptied the joint. Does anyone know where Danny Ocean is? Best to keep an eye on him and his 10 friends...



When I was at GLI, the standard was for critical data to be stored on EEPROMS, which would hold the data indefinitely. Many games use flash or some other solid state storage now.
I heart Crystal Math.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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November 4th, 2016 at 7:27:09 PM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

I wonder if casinos run some kind of drill for their floor employees for this kind of thing? I am sure there is procedure for some of it because we have all heard stories about players collapsing at the table or other, smaller problems. But what about for big things? Surely after the MGM fire there was a realization that a casino needs train for disasters.

I'm a member of the Tournament Director's Association, and participate in their forum.

A few months ago, there was a discussion about emergency procedures.

One member said that they got self-locking rack covers so in an emergency, the dealers can lock up their chips without need for a key. The covers always stayed near the table, but formerly needed a key to lock or unlock.
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ 覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧 Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
RS
RS
Joined: Feb 11, 2014
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November 5th, 2016 at 12:17:36 AM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

I wonder if casinos run some kind of drill for their floor employees for this kind of thing? I am sure there is procedure for some of it because we have all heard stories about players collapsing at the table or other, smaller problems. But what about for big things? Surely after the MGM fire there was a realization that a casino needs train for disasters.



Never been a floor person. But dealing at 2 different non-related casinos, never once was I given instruction on what to do in any form of emergency. Fire, power outage, crazy gunman, or even 2 players fighting at the table. Never heard any of the supervisors talking about any kind of fire-drills or anything like that. I'd guess they are quickly briefed on what to do in an emergency, but don't have actual training....I'd imagine they'd be running around like chickens with their heads cut off trying to figure out what to do.
JohnnyQ
JohnnyQ
Joined: Nov 3, 2009
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November 5th, 2016 at 4:58:52 AM permalink
Quote: RS

But dealing at 2 different non-related casinos, never once was I given instruction on what to do in any form of emergency. Fire, power outage, crazy gunman, or even 2 players fighting at the table.

Wow, that's ridiculous and seems (rightfully so) like an invitation to a huge lawsuit if any dealers were injured in an emergency due to a lack of training. I would think there would at least be a page in some kind of employee handbook.
Like the castle in its corner In a medieval game; I foresee terrible trouble And I stay here just the same
LuckyPhow
LuckyPhow
Joined: May 19, 2016
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November 5th, 2016 at 10:39:02 AM permalink
Quote: RS


Never ... once was I given instruction on what to do in any form of emergency.


When Scarlet Pearl Casino opened in Biloxi not too long ago, I played there on the first full day it was open. As one might expect, it was crazy, with LOTSA players leaving so little room it was hard to breathe, and with LOTSA new staff trying to figure it all out as they went along. For example, I had to summon adult supervision from the floor when the MS Stud dealer tried to take my money because the pair in his 3-card hand beat the pair in my 2-card hand.

Apparently, the mechanical systems were having problems also. At one point, the Fire Alarm sounded, and all the staff looked like deer suddenly caught in car headlights. Floor staff directed dealers to protect the money while they "checked it out." Players all had $$ in the (interrupted) current hand in play, so they weren't going anywhere, either. Things might have changed if we started to smell smoke, but after about 10 very loud alarm-ringing minutes, the noise stopped and play resumed.

Another time (don't recall the casino), power went out just for a few seconds. In subsequent discussion about what one should do in such a situation, the dealer said her training was to fall forward on the table, using her body and arms to block anyone removing chips from her chip tray.

It gives me a warm feeling to know how safe and protected I am by the well-trained casino staff.

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