darkoz
darkoz 
Joined: Dec 22, 2009
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May 5th, 2016 at 12:18:36 PM permalink
Fading Hearts on the River refers to a Poker game where one player is trying to eliminate the possibility of the other player receiving a heart on the River which would allow him to win.

No, it is not an AP move, it is created by wishful thinking (if the player does actually have the ability to change the river card then he is doing a cheat move.)

Brooks Haxton has used this term as the title of his book, along with the sub-title, A Life in High-Stakes Poker.

I gave a review awhile back of Honest Sid which was a biography written by an engineering professor who reminisced about his gambling addicted father. You can read it here http://wizardofvegas.com/forum/off-topic/general/25135-honest-sid/ With Fading Hearts we have the opposite. It is a biography by a loving father about his son who against his wishes, went into a life of poker instead of engineering and has managed to actually make a living off of it.

Brooks is a published poet who has found his son's success a worthy discussion topic. If Brooks had stuck to discussing the Poker game in the exciting play by play action of the first fifty pages, he would have been correct. Unfortunately, unlike Honest Sid, there is not a lifetime of gaming here. Brooks son has only been playing a few years. Instead, as filler, we are treated to off topic concerns such as falling in love, the lives of Brooks parents, how his son suffered from nightmares when he was three years old.

Occasionally he gets back to Poker. One of the most interesting aspects, when funds were seized by the government in an on-line Poker crack-down is still not meaty enough to write about for more than a few pages. His money was confiscated, he had low expectation of getting it back, months pass with no resolution. There simply isn't enough there to write even an entire chapter on. So we end up back in flashback mode to grandparents who faced similar situations with money issues.

The book is written in a poets prose. That is, his predilection to poetry gives us very long flowery discussions of the universe, the human body and psychology and the true meaning of luck and success. Comparing this to Honest Sid, written by an author who is primarily concerned with mechanical interests as opposed to metaphysical, the former book I reviewed was much more interesting.

Due to its lack of staying on point, I cannot wholeheartedly recommend this to everyone. If you enjoy poetic metaphysical discussions about a persons Poker, his wife, his parents and his grandparents, then this book may just be for you.
For Whom the bus tolls; The bus tolls for thee
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
  • Threads: 147
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May 6th, 2016 at 1:29:20 PM permalink
Quote: darkoz

Fading Hearts on the River refers to a Poker game where one player is trying to eliminate the possibility of the other player receiving a heart on the River which would allow him to win.

No, it is not an AP move, it is created by wishful thinking (if the player does actually have the ability to change the river card then he is doing a cheat move.)

Brooks Haxton has used this term as the title of his book, along with the sub-title, A Life in High-Stakes Poker.

I gave a review awhile back of Honest Sid which was a biography written by an engineering professor who reminisced about his gambling addicted father. You can read it here http://wizardofvegas.com/forum/off-topic/general/25135-honest-sid/ With Fading Hearts we have the opposite. It is a biography by a loving father about his son who against his wishes, went into a life of poker instead of engineering and has managed to actually make a living off of it.

Brooks is a published poet who has found his son's success a worthy discussion topic. If Brooks had stuck to discussing the Poker game in the exciting play by play action of the first fifty pages, he would have been correct. Unfortunately, unlike Honest Sid, there is not a lifetime of gaming here. Brooks son has only been playing a few years. Instead, as filler, we are treated to off topic concerns such as falling in love, the lives of Brooks parents, how his son suffered from nightmares when he was three years old.

Occasionally he gets back to Poker. One of the most interesting aspects, when funds were seized by the government in an on-line Poker crack-down is still not meaty enough to write about for more than a few pages. His money was confiscated, he had low expectation of getting it back, months pass with no resolution. There simply isn't enough there to write even an entire chapter on. So we end up back in flashback mode to grandparents who faced similar situations with money issues.

The book is written in a poets prose. That is, his predilection to poetry gives us very long flowery discussions of the universe, the human body and psychology and the true meaning of luck and success. Comparing this to Honest Sid, written by an author who is primarily concerned with mechanical interests as opposed to metaphysical, the former book I reviewed was much more interesting.

Due to its lack of staying on point, I cannot wholeheartedly recommend this to everyone. If you enjoy poetic metaphysical discussions about a person's Poker, his wife, his parents and his grandparents, then this book may just be for you.

Recently someone asked about crossroaders.

I would love to see you or Mission write something about crossroaders and grifters. I'm more interested in knowing how and why particular individuals choose that path how they got started.
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
TheGrimReaper13
TheGrimReaper13
Joined: Sep 25, 2015
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May 6th, 2016 at 2:17:29 PM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

I would love to see you or Mission write something about crossroaders and grifters. I'm more interested in knowing how and why particular individuals choose that path how they got started.

Some people get a kick out of seeing how many they can fool. Simon Says. Eg, Trump/Hillary Says.
So much bullshit; so little time!
ernestmiddle
ernestmiddle
Joined: Apr 19, 2016
  • Threads: 2
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May 6th, 2016 at 5:10:16 PM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

Recently someone asked about crossroaders.

I would love to see you or Mission write something about crossroaders and grifters. I'm more interested in knowing how and why particular individuals choose that path how they got started.



Sometimes it's just a family way of live. like Irish travelers, Gypsies, Carnies, etc. Not much different than Wall Street types.
TheGrimReaper13
TheGrimReaper13
Joined: Sep 25, 2015
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May 6th, 2016 at 5:24:43 PM permalink
Quote: ernestmiddle

Sometimes it's just a family way of live. like Irish travelers, Gypsies, Carnies, etc. Not much different than Wall Street types.

Wall Street, of course.

http://grthm.natt.org.uk/myths-and-truths.php
So much bullshit; so little time!
darkoz
darkoz 
Joined: Dec 22, 2009
  • Threads: 237
  • Posts: 7249
May 6th, 2016 at 8:07:41 PM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

Recently someone asked about crossroaders.

I would love to see you or Mission write something about crossroaders and grifters. I'm more interested in knowing how and why particular individuals choose that path how they got started.



Good idea.

On my list of upcoming reviews is Richard Marcus and his book American Roulette. I read a few years back so its on the bottom as it would be a re-read for me but I will be able to address this idea when reviewing that one.
For Whom the bus tolls; The bus tolls for thee

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