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lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
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May 21st, 2021 at 2:34:32 AM permalink
please delete
Last edited by: lilredrooster on May 21, 2021
𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘧 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳.........𝖤𝖽𝗀𝖺𝗋 𝖠𝗅𝗅𝖺𝗇 𝖯𝗈𝖾
MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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May 21st, 2021 at 10:54:45 AM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

It was totally intentional Funny I was thinking 3 was the limit and I wasn't the only one. I wonder how many I could have done before I was suspended. Could have possibly done hundreds before anyone was on who cared and noticed. I was just feeling goofy having some fun entertaining myself for a bit.



Fair 'nuf: it just seemed "odd."
"What, me worry?"
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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May 21st, 2021 at 11:26:09 AM permalink
Remember when your parents threw away your comic books?

After months of rumors, Heritage Auctions confined this week that it will be bringing the greatest comic collection to surface in at least forty years to market.
5,000 books, mostly from 1943-1951 with some books on either side of that time frame. Most seem to be newsstand fresh and will be the finest examples known. Comics are graded on a 10 point system and it is pretty rare for seventy-five-year-old books to rat much above a 6. The samples shown from this collection are mostly 9.4-9.8s, unheard of in books this old.
The collection was put together by two brothers beginning in 1943, and the two bought a copy of almost every comic published. In 1950, as the story is being told, the older brother was either drafted or volunteered to join the Army and the younger brother enlisted just before his 18th birthday. Supposedly they made a promise to each other to keep their beloved comic collection intact, no matter what happened.
The younger brother was killed in Korea and the older brother, true to his word never let anything happen to their comics.
At some point in the 1990s, a family friend convinced the now elderly older brother to buy protective sheets and backing boards for the collection and told the brother he was sitting on about $100,000 worth of books.
The older brother died last year and the family contacted a local antique dealer who declined to even drive out to look at the books.
A family member bought a few samples to a comic-book store but after being told the size and scope of the collection the owner told them it was way too big for him to handle but he would happily act as an agent and see that the family got top dollar for the books.
Just getting the 5,000 books graded and certified would cost roughly $250,000, before any cosmetic surgery might be done to improve some books. Two private collectors tried to purchase the entire collection but their offers fell short. If the majority of the books are as good as the samples and most of the key books are represented, the collection is worth many many millions. Ten to fifteen million is the number being tossed around, with some saying it's possible that it might total twenty million or more.
Evidently, most family members were unaware of the books and the few that did thought they were worth around $100,000-$250,000 range.
I'm thinking there is some question as to who actually owns the books and this may end up in long-drawn-out court fights.
When the younger brother died, legally his comics should have gone to his parents, not his brother, unless there was something in writing . If that was the case, his other siblings and their descendants should be entitled to a piece of the action.
MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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May 21st, 2021 at 11:32:52 AM permalink
Remember when you collected baseball cards as a kid, and then clipped them onto your bike with a clothes pin to have them make cool, snapping noises when your wheels went around?

Good grief, I had a couple shoe boxes of those cards, and I got rid of them long ago: ah, hindsight ...

On a related note: remember "Mars Attacks" cards, put out by Tops in 1962?

"What, me worry?"
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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May 21st, 2021 at 12:00:22 PM permalink
I was too young for both the Mars Attacks and Civil War cards Topps put out in the early 1960s. As a kid, I'd occasionally find one or two of them but not many. In the early 1980s, a friend got permission to reprint 10,000 sets of the Mars Attacks cards and I finally got a whole set of them. Negotiations to put out a reprint set of the Civil War cards went nowhere, and a few people made bootleg sets.
In the mid1990s, Topps sold off much of their artwork from its vault and I was lucky enough to win three pieces of the original art from the Mars Attacks set. I sold one but still have the other two.
I finally put together a complete set of civil war cards, and recently finished off my mid-1960s Green Beret trading card set. That is a hard set to assemble as a few cards were short printed.
billryan
billryan
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May 21st, 2021 at 12:00:23 PM permalink
deleted
EvenBob
EvenBob
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May 21st, 2021 at 12:08:44 PM permalink
Quote: MrV



Good grief, I had a couple shoe boxes of those cards, and I got rid of them long ago: ah, hindsight ...



If comic books and baseball cards were never thrown away today they would be worthless.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
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June 10th, 2021 at 8:38:03 AM permalink
.......................


1963 - "Louie Louie" - the song that created a scandal
the singer had just gotten braces and had a sore throat so the words were unintelligible
rumors spread that the lyrics were real dirty (for that era)
specifically the kids said the lyrics went..........."tonight at ten I'll **** her again"
it wasn't true - those weren't the lyrics but parents were outraged when they heard about it
believe it or not the FBI was called in and investigated
nothing came of it because the FBI couldn't figure out what the words actually were either

the song is rough and tough and IMHO - although many won't agree - it's one of the greatest rock and roll songs of all time

the blonde at 1:33 in the vid sure looks niche to me

the 2nd vid shows college students eating the song up 20 years later

*





*







*
𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘧 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳.........𝖤𝖽𝗀𝖺𝗋 𝖠𝗅𝗅𝖺𝗇 𝖯𝗈𝖾
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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June 13th, 2021 at 11:22:16 AM permalink
So weird. Found a website that has pictures of my local area where I grew up posted by people from their private collection of photos. Most I had never seen before from the 20s and 30s and up through the seventies. After looking at these for almost an hour I started to get almost panic attack feelings. I felt like I so much did not want to go back to that era of no smartphones, no internet, no color TV, no heart transplants, carbureted cars that would not start in the winter, no Walmart, where everything took forever to do.

When our son was stationed in the Middle East off and on for 10 years my wife would Skype with him at least once a week. If you had a son in Vietnam in the sixties and seventies chances are you would never hear from him other than letters the whole time he was gone. If you were on leave in Saigon you could go to Western Union and for $3 you could talk for 10 minutes to someone in the States. But the lines were so long you had to wait hours standing in 90 degree heat with 90% humidity, it just wasn't worth it to most GI's. I have no nostalgia at all for pre-computer days. How much time did I spend in the 80s going to antique auctions where I had to use maps to figure out exactly where the auction was. Unthinkable now.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
MrV
MrV
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June 13th, 2021 at 11:41:20 AM permalink
"Keep Portland Weird" is our mantra here in Stumptown.

The Kingsmen were a Portland band, they recorded "Louie Louie" locally; my wife recalls seeing them perform at sockhops / dances at a local roller rink.

In their own inimitable style, Portlanders have been paying homage to The Kingsmen for many years; we have a week long celebration called The Rose Festival and it kicks off with a nighttime parade called the Starlight Parade.

To me, the highlight of the parade is watching a huge throng of former, probably washed up tuba, horn and drum players drunkenly careen through the streets, playing "Louie Louie."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8AlkCuyf1M
"What, me worry?"

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