TucsonSteve
TucsonSteve
Joined: Apr 2, 2014
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July 24th, 2014 at 8:51:17 AM permalink
Hi, I have a game that I'm just about ready to pitch to a casino. I think I'd like to try that, rather than pitching it to a gaming distributor.

Any advice on getting an appointment, what to take to the meeting, what to have, to say?
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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July 24th, 2014 at 8:57:31 AM permalink
Try to get to see the Director of Table Games.... get your pitch down to thirty seconds.

If you can't gain and hold his attention in thirty seconds, you've got nothing that is of any value to him. He knows many players are drunk. He knows decision making by players is whimsical.
TucsonSteve
TucsonSteve
Joined: Apr 2, 2014
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July 24th, 2014 at 10:37:38 AM permalink
Hi, Flea,
Thanks. Actually, I was thinking of what to say and show after I get his attention. I can describe the game in twenty seconds, but to fully describe and justify the game would take closer to a half-hour or so.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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July 24th, 2014 at 11:01:06 AM permalink
Twenty seconds is good. If that doesn't generate any questions, continue for a minute at most. Then ask if he has questions. And be prepared to only have about five minutes total.

Keep in mind that DTGs get approached all the time. So don't waste his time.

You may not be able to get an appointment. In that case just go to the casino and find a pit that isn't too busy and ask the pit boss if he can get the DTG's attention for you. He'll make a call and tell you the DTG will be there in a couple minutes. Those couple minutes might be more like twenty in which time the pit boss may ask about the game. Nearby dealers that have empty tables may also listen in.

Use that as an opportunity to practice giving your pitch.
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ 覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧 Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
vegas702
vegas702
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July 24th, 2014 at 12:13:33 PM permalink
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Buzzard
Buzzard
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July 24th, 2014 at 12:29:59 PM permalink
30 minutes to fully explain, seems twice as long as it should be.
Shed not for her the bitter tear Nor give the heart to vain regret Tis but the casket that lies here, The gem that filled it Sparkles yet
DRich
DRich
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July 24th, 2014 at 12:37:09 PM permalink
Quote: TucsonSteve

Hi, I have a game that I'm just about ready to pitch to a casino. I think I'd like to try that, rather than pitching it to a gaming distributor.

Any advice on getting an appointment, what to take to the meeting, what to have, to say?



I would at minimum take a copy of the math, the letter from GLI or BMM, a sample rack card, and a felt to show him.
Order from chaos
Lucky
Lucky
Joined: Nov 6, 2009
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July 27th, 2014 at 6:55:23 AM permalink
Hi Steve. First consideration is where you're located (how close you are to are to casino properties). Second consideration is how far along you are in the development stage of your game.

Let's assume you're in Tucson and have a new table game idea that you've adequately protected and developed. So you're good to go and within driving distance of casinos in AZ, CA and NV. Visit some of those properties and inventory what they have on the floor in your product category, viewing and sorting them in terms of which you think are the best prospects for your game. At each property, have on your person at least a business card and rack card, and preferably have in your vehicle a full layout and documentation on the game (math report(s), Training Manual, etc.). I always have with me a handy page-sized demo sheet which has 2 to 3 betting spots and a paytable that I can easily use to do a quick one-on-one demo on a dead table. While you're at each property, ask one of the floor supervisors in the pit who evaluates new table games (it's usually the DTG, but sometimes is a delegate). Then ask if that person is there and try to see him or her. Be prepared to pitch your game with an introductory 20-30 second explanation in case you have the opportunity. It is extremely rare, but also be prepared to retrieve your layout from your vehicle and give a full demo of the game right there on the spot. If the person to see is not available, then get all the information you can and leave your business and rack card for them with a promise to follow-up.

If you are not convenient to casino properties, you still have to go through the 'prospecting' stage; it's just more costly and time-consuming.

The gist of what I'm saying is that (a) know not only about your game, but also what's going on at the casino you're targeting, and (b) getting an appointment via email or phone call is very difficult if you haven't first gone through the survey and prospecting stage.
"Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." -- Winston Churchill
Paradigm
Paradigm
Joined: Feb 24, 2011
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July 27th, 2014 at 7:12:37 AM permalink
Lots of good info in Lucky's post. The 8.5" x 11" laminated player spot with paytable is a key piece of info. It is rare that the DTG or Shift Mgr is going to want to see the full layout draped over a table unless you have a set appt. For drop by attempts to demo the game, having the laminate with a mini layout on the reversre, a deck of cards, 10 chips in your pocket & a rack card/biz card is all you will need.

Math reports & AP analysis in the car can be offered & retrieved as a gauge of interest after the demo if you get that far. Selling is the hardest part of the journey which is why distributors get a large piece of the action if you sign with them.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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Thanks for this post from:
kgb92
July 27th, 2014 at 7:13:42 AM permalink
Quote: TucsonSteve

Hi, Flea,
Thanks. Actually, I was thinking of what to say and show after I get his attention. I can describe the game in twenty seconds, but to fully describe and justify the game would take closer to a half-hour or so.

Good lucking getting a half hour... EVER.

You have to do it from HIS point of view, not YOUR point of view.

One dealer with minimal training is what he wants to hear.

A folded felt mockup that is plain and easy to grasp is what he wants to see, with no clutter or arm motions that will make surveillance complain.

You show this game to players? How long before they knew what they were doing? The DTG knows most of his customers are drunk, particularly if they are in the novelty games pit.

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