redietz
redietz
Joined: Jun 5, 2019
  • Threads: 49
  • Posts: 767
May 29th, 2021 at 11:41:33 AM permalink
I was informed by my compadres that a famous annual quarter horse race at Sam Houston, which was supposed to feature the 10 fastest quarter horses in the country, ran into a snafu when eight of the 10 finalists tested positive for drugging after hair samples were used for testing.

After a delay, the race administrators said the horses could run, but that there would be no wagering and all horses would be re-tested after the race. Due to these rules, the trainers chose to not run seven of the horses. Three ran, one of whom obviously had had a failed test before the race. So a 700K prize, which is gigantic for quarter horses, was split among the three remaining horses who actually ran. The horse that had previously failed the test but ran was retested with that purse chunk pending the test result.

And that pretty much sums up the current state of American horse racing, quarter horses and thoroughbreds alike.
"You can't breathe dead hippo waking, sleeping, and eating, and at the same time keep your precarious grip on existence."
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 217
  • Posts: 13347
May 29th, 2021 at 12:14:42 PM permalink
I'm not that familiar with quarter horse racing. In the 1970s, some folks built a monstrosity of a track on Long Island for 1/4 horses. The project was delayed and went well over budget so the original owners were forced out.
When it finally opened several years later, the traffic jam was so insane that an armored car carrying the money for betting was two hours late so racing had to be delayed.
It didn't even last a season and attempts to revive it also failed.
It might be best known as being the site of the 10th Anniversary Woodstock Concert that attracted tens of thousands of hippies. Many of the hippies saw the abandoned venue and decided it was the perfect spot for a mass squat. It literally took weeks before the last of them was rounded up and ejected.
A strange thing about Parr Meadows was they didn't offer traditional betting. Only Quinellas. I think it had something to do with the rules regulating horse racing at the time.
The difference between fiction and reality is that fiction is supposed to make sense.

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