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AlanMendelson
AlanMendelson
Joined: Oct 5, 2011
  • Threads: 102
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October 27th, 2011 at 3:13:02 PM permalink
Well, this was surprise. After seeing in another thread how New Jersey publishes its rules for playing the game of craps, I called the Enforcement Division of the Nevada Gaming Commission and asked where their regs were published. They're not. In fact, the Nevada Gaming Commission only has minimum standards for the game giving the casinos the ability to have stricter rules.

Several times some of you have asked for proof that dice sliding or dice setting was legal, not legal, valid, not valid, recognized, not recognized and wanted the rules cited. Well, there's nothing to cite, it appears.

I wrote about it on my site with attribution: http://alanbestbuys.com/id139.html
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
Joined: Sep 30, 2011
  • Threads: 15
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August 19th, 2014 at 12:40:06 AM permalink
Quote: AlanMendelson

Well, this was surprise. After seeing in another thread how New Jersey publishes its rules for playing the game of craps, I called the Enforcement Division of the Nevada Gaming Commission and asked where their regs were published. They're not. In fact, the Nevada Gaming Commission only has minimum standards for the game giving the casinos the ability to have stricter rules.



This liberal flexibility is best, especially from the game developer's standpoint.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  • Threads: 236
  • Posts: 6763
August 19th, 2014 at 9:55:41 AM permalink
Quote: AlanMendelson

Well, this was surprise. After seeing in another thread how New Jersey publishes its rules for playing the game of craps, I called the Enforcement Division of the Nevada Gaming Commission and asked where their regs were published. They're not. In fact, the Nevada Gaming Commission only has minimum standards for the game giving the casinos the ability to have stricter rules.

Several times some of you have asked for proof that dice sliding or dice setting was legal, not legal, valid, not valid, recognized, not recognized and wanted the rules cited. Well, there's nothing to cite, it appears.

I wrote about it on my site with attribution: http://alanbestbuys.com/id139.html



Technically, they are published, but they are very generic. The main idea is that any "device" has to produce fair results.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
tringlomane
tringlomane
Joined: Aug 25, 2012
  • Threads: 8
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August 19th, 2014 at 10:03:17 AM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

Quote: AlanMendelson

Well, this was surprise. After seeing in another thread how New Jersey publishes its rules for playing the game of craps, I called the Enforcement Division of the Nevada Gaming Commission and asked where their regs were published. They're not. In fact, the Nevada Gaming Commission only has minimum standards for the game giving the casinos the ability to have stricter rules.

Several times some of you have asked for proof that dice sliding or dice setting was legal, not legal, valid, not valid, recognized, not recognized and wanted the rules cited. Well, there's nothing to cite, it appears.

I wrote about it on my site with attribution: http://alanbestbuys.com/id139.html



Technically, they are published, but they are very generic. The main idea is that any "device" has to produce fair results.



Nevada is too generic for my liking in terms of basic game rules (both machines and tables), which is sad given it's overall length. Pennsylvania is a good example of a state that other states should model their regulations after.
superrick
superrick
Joined: Jul 14, 2010
  • Threads: 28
  • Posts: 775
August 19th, 2014 at 10:19:42 AM permalink
Quote: AlanMendelson


I wrote about it on my site with attribution: http://alanbestbuys.com/id139.html


So Alan is this the smoking gun, when you keep insisting that Nevada has rules on craps, and you keep insisting that the hearsay from a gaming agent is what you go by?
Quote: AlanMendelson


NEW JERSEY'S PUBLISHED REGULATIONS FOR THROWING DICE, AND WHY YOU WON'T FIND THEM FOR NEVADA
Update October 27, 2011  I just found this-- New Jersey's published regulations about throwing dice and what is considered a valid throw and what isn't considered to be a valid throw.  And, it's a bit different from what many craps players think-- and it actually differs slightly from what regulators in Nevada told me.  And I also just found out that you won't find the Nevada regulations printed anywhere.  More about that later.
But first, the New Jersey rules.  Here are the regulations as published by New Jersey regulators:
.....(too-long website quote truncated by mod to approx. 5 sentences; use the link for further info.)


Again you evidently don't get it, anything told to you is just hearsay, it has to be in black and white to hold up in court!
Note, all my post start with this is just my opinion...! You do good brada ..! superrick Winning comes from knowledge and skill when your betting and not reading fiction http://procraps4u2.myfanforum.org/index.php ...
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  • Threads: 236
  • Posts: 6763
August 19th, 2014 at 4:15:23 PM permalink
Quote: tringlomane

Quote: Ayecarumba

Quote: AlanMendelson

Well, this was surprise. After seeing in another thread how New Jersey publishes its rules for playing the game of craps, I called the Enforcement Division of the Nevada Gaming Commission and asked where their regs were published. They're not. In fact, the Nevada Gaming Commission only has minimum standards for the game giving the casinos the ability to have stricter rules.

Several times some of you have asked for proof that dice sliding or dice setting was legal, not legal, valid, not valid, recognized, not recognized and wanted the rules cited. Well, there's nothing to cite, it appears.

I wrote about it on my site with attribution: http://alanbestbuys.com/id139.html



Technically, they are published, but they are very generic. The main idea is that any "device" has to produce fair results.



Nevada is too generic for my liking in terms of basic game rules (both machines and tables), which is sad given it's overall length. Pennsylvania is a good example of a state that other states should model their regulations after.



At first blush, the lack of specificity can be unnerving. However, after a little reflection, it makes sense. Why plug up the the books with lines and lines of constantly changing "rules" that attempt to micromanage every aspect of the game? Nevada avoids all the bureaucracy by simply saying, "Describe the wager, and use a fair means to determine the outcome". Less is more.
Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication - Leonardo da Vinci
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
Joined: Sep 30, 2011
  • Threads: 15
  • Posts: 417
August 20th, 2014 at 1:25:17 AM permalink
Quote: Ayecarumba

At first blush, the lack of specificity can be unnerving. However, after a little reflection, it makes sense. Why plug up the the books with lines and lines of constantly changing "rules" that attempt to micromanage every aspect of the game? Nevada avoids all the bureaucracy by simply saying, "Describe the wager, and use a fair means to determine the outcome". Less is more.



Exactly!

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