SanchoPanza
SanchoPanza
Joined: May 10, 2010
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November 11th, 2014 at 3:14:08 PM permalink
Quote: rudeboyoi

Say a few random Americans went up and destroyed some buildings in Canada, would our country as a whole be the aggressor?

Depends on what the grievance with Canada might be.
ontariodealer
ontariodealer
Joined: Aug 5, 2013
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November 11th, 2014 at 4:09:01 PM permalink
lay off the beer store or else.
get second you pig
JohnnyQ
JohnnyQ
Joined: Nov 3, 2009
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November 11th, 2014 at 5:01:15 PM permalink
And back on topic.....

I have been to the Vietnam Memorial in DC numerous times. This site prompted me to do a little search and see if I could find how many people from the small town that I currently live in are on the Wall. Six.

I also looked up the small town I grew up in. Seven.

Las Vegas. Fifty-Six.

Vietnam Wall Search Site

It is heart wrenching to see how young so many of these valiant men were.
“You see, that’s why we’re a great band ! Yes we are, we are a band. I am in a band.”
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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November 11th, 2014 at 6:41:17 PM permalink
Quote: Buzzard

upset at the design of the original memorial .



Quote:

The selected design was very controversial, in particular its unconventional design, its black color and its lack of ornamentation. Some public officials voiced their displeasure, calling the wall "a black gash of shame."[7] Two prominent early supporters of the project, H. Ross Perot and James Webb, withdrew their support once they saw the design. Said Webb, “I never in my wildest dreams imagined such a nihilistic slab of stone.” James Watt, Secretary of the Interior under President Ronald Reagan, initially refused to issue a building permit for the memorial due to the public outcry about the design.[8] Since its early years, criticism of the Memorial's design faded. In the words of Scruggs, "It has become something of a shrine."[7]



It was considered a radical design at the time. Many people preferred a more traditional monument.

Unless it was something completely ridiculous, I think people would have come to like anything as long as it was elegant and respectful.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
petroglyph
petroglyph
Joined: Jan 3, 2013
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November 8th, 2018 at 1:04:54 PM permalink
A travelling Vietnam Veterans memorial wall is in Laughlin Nevada today 11/8/2018 through Sunday 11/11/2018 at the Tropicana Casino.

If you have visited before or doing so for the first time, it is a memorable and emotional experience.

https://troplaughlin.com/events/2017-veterans-weekend-celebration/
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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November 8th, 2018 at 1:27:21 PM permalink
Quote: petroglyph

A travelling Vietnam Veterans memorial wall is in Laughlin Nevada today 11/8/2018 through Sunday 11/11/2018 at the Tropicana Casino.

If you have visited before or doing so for the first time, it is a memorable and emotional experience.

https://troplaughlin.com/events/2017-veterans-weekend-celebration/





Trop is very nice to Veterans. It's got my business when in Laughlin. I was thinking of heading down for Larry The Cable Guy on Sunday at one of their competitors.
RonC
RonC
Joined: Jan 18, 2010
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Thanks for this post from:
petroglyph
November 8th, 2018 at 1:47:39 PM permalink
Find a name or two on the wall...read about them...here is one for which a chow hall is named (if it still there, it has been a few years) at Marine Corps' Officer Candidate's School in Quantico, Va:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOHN P. BOBO
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Weapons Platoon Commander, Company I, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division, in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 30 March 1967. Company I was establishing night ambush sites when the command group was attacked by a reinforced North Vietnamese company supported by heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire. Lieutenant Bobo immediately organized a hasty defense and moved from position to position encouraging the outnumbered Marines despite the murderous enemy fire. Recovering a rocket launcher from among the friendly casualties, he organized a new launcher team and directed its fire into the enemy gun positions. When an exploding enemy mortar round severed Lieutenant Bobo's right leg below the knee, he refused to be evacuated and insisted upon being placed in a firing position to cover the movement of the command group to a better location. With a web belt around his leg, jammed into the dirt to curtail the bleeding, he remained in this position and delivered devastating fire into the ranks of the enemy attempting to overrun the Marines. Lieutenant Bobo was mortally wounded while firing his weapon into the main point of the enemy attack but his valiant spirit inspired his men to heroic efforts, and his tenacious stand enabled the command group to gain a protective position where it repulsed the enemy onslaught. Lieutenant Bobo's superb leadership, dauntless courage, and bold initiative reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country."


I have found others, including the father a friend of mine never met and read of their heroism that might not have merited the Medal of Honor, but was certainly way above the call of duty...

Do the same for more recent actions.

It is humbling. I always wonder...where do we find such men? ...and more and more often than in the past...and women...
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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November 8th, 2018 at 2:07:31 PM permalink
We don't find them. Circumstances do.
Years ago, I was at a bar when I noticed the guy next to me was wearing a Naval Academy ring. We got to talking and he told me he had served in the Corp in Vietnam.
I asked him about Ollie North as they were about the same age and it turned out they'd been in the same class. We talked some more about things and the bartender said something about the Service Academy turning out heroes. I'll never forget his reply. He told the bartender a hero is simply someone in the wrong place at the wrong time that does the right thing. Take away any one of those factors and we have no hero.
RonC
RonC
Joined: Jan 18, 2010
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November 8th, 2018 at 2:57:56 PM permalink
Quote: billryan

We don't find them. Circumstances do.
Years ago, I was at a bar when I noticed the guy next to me was wearing a Naval Academy ring. We got to talking and he told me he had served in the Corp in Vietnam.
I asked him about Ollie North as they were about the same age and it turned out they'd been in the same class. We talked some more about things and the bartender said something about the Service Academy turning out heroes. I'll never forget his reply. He told the bartender a hero is simply someone in the wrong place at the wrong time that does the right thing. Take away any one of those factors and we have no hero.



I do get that, of course, but it doesn't take away from the fact that they had the stones to do the right thing in spite of the odds being against them.

I had a guy who worked for me once who drove a LAV into the open to engage a tank so that a nearby tank killer could take it out.

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