WangSanJose
WangSanJose
Joined: May 2, 2012
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May 27th, 2012 at 4:51:13 AM permalink
10 minimum with that S17, 28% house edge game? WOW!
Today I went to see the UFC show in MGM, I saw the minimum bet is still $25.
Great
Tiltpoul
Tiltpoul
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May 27th, 2012 at 5:02:18 AM permalink
Quote: WangSanJose

Today I went to ** casino, I jumped my bet from 5 to 35 suddenly when he count is good. Then the dealer said "check game" loudly! A pit boss came to the table and watching me. I got a pair of *s against dealers 5, I split, then win both hands. I was feeling heat... Then I gave ** dollar tip to the dealer, and left.
This is the second time I play in Vegas, and I won a little bit again. So happy~ But the heat made me feel really nervous. I love Vegas.



They weren't watching you, per se. They were watching to see if you had an accomplice for $200 a hand who is following your lead. No major casino is going to watch a 1-7 spread at $5 minimum for the $35. They are checking the game to make sure that nobody hops in and starts betting big. They could implement a no mid-shoe or cap a max bet or flat bet. They may also be getting a picture to keep an eye on you in the future. But they can go back and watch tape, so nothing you can do about it.

It could also be a dealer who is on the verge of losing his job and trying to prove his worth. But 5-35 is not going to worry ANY casino on the strip.

BTW, you keep saying a 28% house edge game. I think your terminology is wrong, as no person in their right mind would play a game with a 28% house edge. I don't even know what you're referring to, so I can't help you with the correct term.
"One out of every four people are [morons]"- Kyle, South Park
JB
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JB
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May 27th, 2012 at 5:04:08 AM permalink
Quote: Tiltpoul

BTW, you keep saying a 28% house edge game. I think your terminology is wrong, as no person in their right mind would play a game with a 28% house edge. I don't even know what you're referring to, so I can't help you with the correct term.


I think he means 0.28% (based on the first post of this thread).
Tiltpoul
Tiltpoul
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May 27th, 2012 at 5:05:12 AM permalink
Quote: JB

I think he means 0.28% (based on the first post of this thread).



I realized that as soon as I re-read his post. BIG DIFFERENCE!
"One out of every four people are [morons]"- Kyle, South Park
weaselman
weaselman
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May 27th, 2012 at 5:59:08 AM permalink
Quote: 1BB


A pair of 6s vs a 2 is a losing hand no matter how you play it. Stand:lose 65%, hit:lose 60%, split:lose 58%. These numbers are in my head. Sorry I can't direct you to a site.


It's not that bad, but the difference between split and stand is way more dramatic. Stand is -25%, split is -19%.
But. When double after split is not allowed, the expectation of split becomes about -27%, so the correct action is to hit in that situation. Perhaps, that's what the book refers to?
"When two people always agree one of them is unnecessary"
WangSanJose
WangSanJose
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May 27th, 2012 at 6:00:40 AM permalink
The 28% house edge is referring to the S17 game in MGM, according to the blackjack survey:
http://wizardofvegas.com/guides/blackjack-survey/?sort=dr&dir=asc

The casino I went to is at downtown, everybody were betting 5-20 dollars.
My friend just told me that the dealer said "check game" because they were calling the floor come here to check if the dealer will make mistakes with big amount. (comparing to other people on the table, 35 was a big bet.) My friend also told me don't worry about that.

Thank you for the advice.
Great
LonesomeGambler
LonesomeGambler
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May 29th, 2012 at 10:32:42 AM permalink
Wang: the "best" index number is the one that gives you the best additional gain, which is the insurance index. 16 v T is the next most important one. Don Schlesinger's "Illustrious 18" and "Fab 4" indices give you the 22 most valuable indices in a game with late surrender, but it's worthwhile to learn as many as possible if you intend to become a skilled counter. Some of the indices are different between S17 and H17 games (like 12 v 3), so you'll need to learn which indices have variations. H17 games will often provide you with a better overall opportunity than S17 games since they're more likely to feature LS, which is more valuable to a counter than S17.

And you're worrying too much about heat—it's the floorperson's job to watch the games and the players. At a grind joint, the dealer may call out "cheques play" (not "check game"), which indicates that higher-denomination cheques are being wagered. This usually doesn't happen until you play $100+, but if you're at the El Cortez, you'll hear it an awful lot. It's just procedure, and you shouldn't freak out the second someone comes to watch your game. They probably don't even know the correct BS for splitting, much less play deviations, so relax.
WangSanJose
WangSanJose
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May 30th, 2012 at 5:56:42 AM permalink
Quote: LonesomeGambler

Wang: the "best" index number is the one that gives you the best additional gain, which is the insurance index. 16 v T is the next most important one. Don Schlesinger's "Illustrious 18" and "Fab 4" indices give you the 22 most valuable indices in a game with late surrender, but it's worthwhile to learn as many as possible if you intend to become a skilled counter. Some of the indices are different between S17 and H17 games (like 12 v 3), so you'll need to learn which indices have variations. H17 games will often provide you with a better overall opportunity than S17 games since they're more likely to feature LS, which is more valuable to a counter than S17.

And you're worrying too much about heat—it's the floorperson's job to watch the games and the players. At a grind joint, the dealer may call out "cheques play" (not "check game"), which indicates that higher-denomination cheques are being wagered. This usually doesn't happen until you play $100+, but if you're at the El Cortez, you'll hear it an awful lot. It's just procedure, and you shouldn't freak out the second someone comes to watch your game. They probably don't even know the correct BS for splitting, much less play deviations, so relax.



That's very helpful! I feel a little confused right here, what's the difference between floor person & pit boss?
Are single deck & double deck games draw more heats than 6 deck & 8 deck games? I used a bigger spread in MGM's S17 6 deck game, and felt nothing.
Therefore, I'm considering that if I want to play longer, I should play 6 deck rather than single & double deck.

BTW, I've came back to my home, and I'll go to Vegas soon again. I earned a lot in another small casino again by playing 2 decks. I used a 1-4 spread, and I got no heat. My winning amount covered my trip cost, so happy!
Thank you guys who helped me in this great forum.
Great
LonesomeGambler
LonesomeGambler
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May 30th, 2012 at 9:44:28 AM permalink
A pit boss is the floorperson's supervisor. There is usually one pit boss per pit and several floorpersons working under them. Often, the pit boss will be the one wearing a different-colored jacket. The floorperson is usually the person who takes your player's card, checks on the rack, and watches the game; the pit boss generally stays in the center of the pit, assisting when needed. A floorperson watching your game is not necessarily heat, by the way. And a 1-4 spread is too weak to beat double-deck anyway, so heat should not be too much of an issue. 6-deck games generally have less heat than DD or SD. Play whichever games you want, but keep your sessions short and play aggressively. That's the only way for a new counter to make any money, in my opinion.

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