Poll

5 votes (31.25%)
5 votes (31.25%)
No votes (0%)
6 votes (37.5%)

16 members have voted

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1344
  • Posts: 22250
April 10th, 2015 at 5:20:31 PM permalink
I'm almost finished with a review of Betsoft, which provides software for Internet casinos. One game they have, which I've never seen before, is 21 Burn Blackjack. It is like Change It, which was at the last Raving show and can be found at the Fremont. The thrust of 21 Burn is the player can exchange his second card with a random card. Instead of a flat fee, the player is forced to make a side bet, which is highly negative, in order to burn his second card. Also, blackjacks pay 1 to 1.

Please consider my analysis preliminary. I'm trying to talk Miplet into doing a parallel analysis, but I welcome anybody to try.

As usual, I welcome all questions, comments, suggestions, and especially corrections. The question for the poll is would you play this game, assuming the higher house edge were not a factor?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
rudeboyoi
rudeboyoi
Joined: Mar 28, 2010
  • Threads: 27
  • Posts: 2001
April 10th, 2015 at 5:47:37 PM permalink
I'm assuming you make the burn wager during the course of the hand and not prior to it but maybe make that a bit more clear.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1344
  • Posts: 22250
April 10th, 2015 at 5:50:02 PM permalink
Quote: rudeboyoi

I'm assuming you make the burn wager during the course of the hand and not prior to it but maybe make that a bit more clear.



Yes, that is the case.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
rudeboyoi
rudeboyoi
Joined: Mar 28, 2010
  • Threads: 27
  • Posts: 2001
April 10th, 2015 at 6:15:01 PM permalink
Out of curiosity how close was the decision to burn 88 vs 7 instead of splitting?
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1344
  • Posts: 22250
April 10th, 2015 at 6:57:13 PM permalink
Quote: rudeboyoi

Out of curiosity how close was the decision to burn 88 vs 7 instead of splitting?



Dang. That question made me realize I made an error with the burn or split decision. As you suspected, the correct play is to split. Here are the values:

Split: 0.211530
Burn: -0.182596

I owe you 25 push-ups.

My page has been corrected with the new strategy and lower house edge.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
miplet
miplet
Joined: Dec 1, 2009
  • Threads: 5
  • Posts: 1946
April 10th, 2015 at 7:08:48 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm almost finished with a review of Betsoft, which provides software for Internet casinos. One game they have, which I've never seen before, is 21 Burn Blackjack. It is like Change It, which was at the last Raving show and can be found at the Fremont. The thrust of 21 Burn is the player can exchange his second card with a random card. Instead of a flat fee, the player is forced to make a side bet, which is highly negative, in order to burn his second card. Also, blackjacks pay 1 to 1.

Please consider my analysis preliminary. I'm trying to talk Miplet into doing a parallel analysis, but I welcome anybody to try.

As usual, I welcome all questions, comments, suggestions, and especially corrections. The question for the poll is would you play this game, assuming the higher house edge were not a factor?


Is the Burn bet before or after checking for BJ?
“Man Babes” #AxelFabulous
Paradigm
Paradigm
Joined: Feb 24, 2011
  • Threads: 42
  • Posts: 2225
April 10th, 2015 at 7:17:58 PM permalink
If it is handy, on what percentage of hands are you invoking the "game feature" and making the burn wager to get a new card?

Have you calculated if the game is more or less volatile than regular? One of the biggest problems with BJ for a lot of recreational table game players is the lack of volatility in regular BJ as compared to UTH, High Card Flush or Mississippi Stud that seem to be winning placements recently.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 10266
April 11th, 2015 at 12:46:33 PM permalink
I'm confused about two points.


Quote:

8. After seeing his initial hand and the dealer up card, the player may burn his second card for a random card, shown face down next to his hand.


Face down? How do you play out your hand?


Quote:

11. An ace and 10 after burning a card shall be treated as a blackjack.


If BJ pays even money, why do we care that it's treated as a BJ? What other option is there?
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ ————————————————————————————————————— Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
  • Threads: 73
  • Posts: 6510
April 11th, 2015 at 12:51:42 PM permalink
Quote: DJTeddyBear



If BJ pays even money, why do we care that it's treated as a BJ? What other option is there?



Probably because a BJ is an automatic winner and can't be pushed by a dealer 21.
Living longer does not always infer +EV
Avincow
Avincow
Joined: Oct 17, 2014
  • Threads: 24
  • Posts: 395
April 11th, 2015 at 7:57:28 PM permalink
This game is pretty horrible.

If the house edge for the main game is .73% and the side bet is 67.31% (WOW), then for every $15 bet ($10 on the main game and $5 on the side bet) you are losing $3.43. So a combined house edge of 22.9%? That's not my idea of fun.

And H17, only 1 split, no surrender? How can they pinch pennies when they are already sucking the players dry with a laughable side bet pay table? I give it 0 stars out of 5.

If the house edge wasn't so ridiculous, I would play the game.

  • Jump to: