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tringlomane
tringlomane
Joined: Aug 25, 2012
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April 16th, 2020 at 3:12:20 AM permalink
Quote: rxwine

You know what's funny, or not so funny, that just occurred to me.

We really don't need to wait for a vaccine, or even for extensive testing.

IF WE ALL JUST HAD ENOUGH N95 MASKS WE COULD KNOCK THIS THING PRACTICIALLY OUT IN 3 WEEKS.

A little training, or repetitive training, by public service announcements daily, on avoiding on making sure you don't contaminate yourself, and 90% of this would be gone. I'd bet all my money on it.

I say 90%, because I suspect some couldn't get things right, or perhaps have to work with an invalid family member.

I'm not even kidding.



Sadly I think you would be way wrong. 20%+ in US think this is a lie, imo. Plus N95 masks are meant for one time use. Most people aren't that anal. And we would need billions of N95 masks to do it right.

3M should be making their masks off, but I'm not certain they are.
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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April 17th, 2020 at 5:28:14 PM permalink
Quote: tringlomane

Sadly I think you would be way wrong. 20%+ in US think this is a lie, imo. Plus N95 masks are meant for one time use. Most people aren't that anal. And we would need billions of N95 masks to do it right.

3M should be making their masks off, but I'm not certain they are.



Normally masks are for one use when they are used to go from infected patient to non-infected as all gear is disposed of. But for wearing about, they should be fine. The filter is not going to be worn out.

Quote:

A key consideration for safe extended use is that the respirator must maintain its fit and function. Workers in other industries routinely use N95 respirators for several hours uninterrupted. Experience in these settings indicates that respirators can function within their design specifications for 8 hours of continuous or intermittent use.



If you're not out exposed for 8 hours straight, given, no better option, I'd wear it again until expended.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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Thanks for this post from:
onenickelmiracle
April 17th, 2020 at 5:40:52 PM permalink
Now dermatologists are reporting another symptom. "Covid toes". Not everyone gets it, but some toes get purple spots and may be painful or itchy.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
SOOPOO
SOOPOO
Joined: Aug 8, 2010
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SanchoPanza
April 18th, 2020 at 6:36:32 PM permalink
I have worn N-95 masks at work in the past. They were usually used when working on tuberculosis patients. Before being issued them, I was 'fit tested' once a year, to make sure I had the exact size needed to work as intended. I absolutely hated wearing them. It was very difficult to breathe while wearing one properly. I am sure many breathe around the edges, basically ruining the efficacy.
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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April 18th, 2020 at 7:23:33 PM permalink
Quote: SOOPOO

I have worn N-95 masks at work in the past. They were usually used when working on tuberculosis patients. Before being issued them, I was 'fit tested' once a year, to make sure I had the exact size needed to work as intended. I absolutely hated wearing them. It was very difficult to breathe while wearing one properly. I am sure many breathe around the edges, basically ruining the efficacy.



I guess that would discourage excessive socializing.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
Keyser
Keyser
Joined: Apr 16, 2010
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April 18th, 2020 at 7:43:04 PM permalink
SOOPOO,

What about adding a salted filter to your mask? It should capture mositure, dry it out and disrupt the virus significantly. Added efficiency for homemade masks and worn n95s perhaps?

When I say a salt filter I literally mean soaking a filter/fabric in a strong salt solution and then drying it out completely before using it inside.
WatchMeWin
WatchMeWin
Joined: May 20, 2011
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April 18th, 2020 at 7:56:49 PM permalink
Hate to state the following, however, Until there is an approved vaccine for COVID-19, our lives will not be the same and our lives will continue to be in danger. We will gain a false sense of security over the summer. Then the virus will most likely spread again like wild fire in the fall. Sure there will be therapeutics that will help sick people in 6-12 months, however the vaccine will not be for 12-18 months.

This is not like any other virus we have seen. It is HIGHLY contagious and spreads very easily. I work with the top Infectious Diseases clinicians in the world. Each has told me that this virus is a BEAST! Continue to practice social distancing and don't assume this enemy will disappear in the summer. You best defense is practicing social distance and build up your immune system by eating healthy, supplements, exercising, sex, and good rest.
'Winners hit n run... Losers stick around'
Keyser
Keyser
Joined: Apr 16, 2010
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April 18th, 2020 at 8:38:57 PM permalink
Yes and no.

It's not necessarily with us in it's currently deadly form forever. Even the Spanish Flu weakened and faded away/mutated after a year and a half or so. (Sorry if this virus name offends some LOL.)
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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April 18th, 2020 at 9:54:06 PM permalink
Quote:

Broadway star Nick Cordero will have his right leg amputated as a result of coronavirus-related complications, his wife Amanda Kloots announced on her Instagram Story Saturday.

Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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April 20th, 2020 at 11:47:35 AM permalink
I don't know if anyone will know the answer but I'll ask it anyway.

What's the smallest amount of plasma infusion of someone else's antibodies does it take to be effective? In lieu of a vaccine, how effective might that be? Or is it only used when you're actively sick?

If a relatively small infusion just took a while to be effective, that would still be great, but maybe I'm misunderstanding how it is used. But I was thinking similar to a flu vaccine, you need about 2 weeks for the immunity to kick in. If you get the flu before then, it's less likely to be effective.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?

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