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BedWetterBetter
BedWetterBetter
Joined: Oct 20, 2012
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February 1st, 2020 at 12:42:22 PM permalink
Quote: Gandler

It matters because it paints the context for your story.

You would have missed your flight regardless of if the tank was full or not. The only reason you did not miss your flight is because it was delayed (which is what was not mentioned earlier).

You should have ordered a ride earlier instead of cutting it so close and then it would be a moot point....

The issue is a timing issue (on your end), that you lucked out on only because of a flight delay. (I know you said you ordered a rider earlier who cancelled, but again that is why you always order well in advance or schedule a pickup, I think Lyft has that option, Uber certainly does). Or just schedule an appointment with a taxi company, they certainly schedule rides.

Getting upset at a company for a flight you would have missed regardless of your interpretation of their fuel gauge and still made by pure luck, is silly....

(by the way, I am not a fan of Lyft so I am no mindless Lyft defender, but my reasons for not supporting Lyft are logical, based on their structure, not on a perceived bad ride that was not even their fault...) I try to support local taxis, but I will use Uber if needed.



The point is that it is unprofessional to show up unprepared or give the appearance of being inadequately stocked for travel. Would you board an airplane, private or commercial, that is spewing black smoke or you glance into the cockpit and see a light flashing or making a loud noise? Probably not or you would ask the pilot to address the issue. If he tells you " don't worry we'll make it with no problem, just let me do my job."

Would you then sleep the entire journey or travel without concern & give him a positive rating when the App prompts you to rate the ride? But yea, it's fine because he knows the plane better than you and you're not qualified .
BedWetterBetter
BedWetterBetter
Joined: Oct 20, 2012
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February 1st, 2020 at 12:45:38 PM permalink
Quote: michael99000

Would be more accurate to say, the Lyft driver showed up with enough gas to get you to the airport. And that your opinion of him was based on a concern you had over a problem that never came to be.



Would you like it if your next plane ride had just enough fuel to get you to your destination and the fuel light is flashing the entire trip or had more than enough fuel and didn't make a sound?
DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
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February 4th, 2020 at 11:21:26 AM permalink
Quote: BedWetterBetter

Would you like it if your next plane ride had just enough fuel to get you to your destination and the fuel light is flashing the entire trip or had more than enough fuel and didn't make a sound?



I would prefer a plane at the minimum amount of fuel required by the FAA. A lighter plane flies cheaper and that will eventually be priced into the fare.
Order from chaos
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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February 4th, 2020 at 11:27:09 AM permalink
Quote: DRich

I would prefer a plane at the minimum amount of fuel required by the FAA. A lighter plane flies cheaper and that will eventually be priced into the fare.



Until you hit a head wind and have to make a refueling stop.
TigerWu
TigerWu
Joined: May 23, 2016
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February 4th, 2020 at 11:32:42 AM permalink
Quote: BedWetterBetter

Would you like it if your next plane ride had just enough fuel to get you to your destination and the fuel light is flashing the entire trip or had more than enough fuel and didn't make a sound?



Apples and oranges.

If a plane runs out of fuel, everyone (potentially) dies.

If a car runs out of fuel, you just slow down and stop on the side of the road.
DRich
DRich
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February 4th, 2020 at 11:48:54 AM permalink
Quote: billryan

Until you hit a head wind and have to make a refueling stop.



I have been on hundreds of flights without ever having to make an unscheduled fuel stop. Some of my companies small jets will stop to refuel when flying accros country but those are scheduled stops.

I wonder how many commercial flights make an unscheduled fuel stop each day? There are around 87,000 commercial lights per day in the U.S., how many per day do you think make an unscheduled fuel stop? I have no idea, but I would guess less than 1 per day.

I used to fly a lot between Las Vegas and Corpus Christi, some days we could make it without refueling but others days we would schedule a stop in central Texas to refuel. It just depended on the winds and the altitude that we were cleared at.
Order from chaos
BedWetterBetter
BedWetterBetter
Joined: Oct 20, 2012
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February 4th, 2020 at 1:33:53 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

I would prefer a plane at the minimum amount of fuel required by the FAA. A lighter plane flies cheaper and that will eventually be priced into the fare.



Private planes do not have regulated fares and quite a few tragic events have occurred because the pilot did not prepare fuel supply properly, ie: Brazilian soccer team crash in 16'.

And the chances of a major airline adjusting fares to help customers is laughable. But yea, keep avoiding the matter of unprofessional conduct and lousy preparation.
BedWetterBetter
BedWetterBetter
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February 4th, 2020 at 1:37:22 PM permalink
Quote: TigerWu

Apples and oranges.

If a plane runs out of fuel, everyone (potentially) dies.

If a car runs out of fuel, you just slow down and stop on the side of the road.



Unless it's rush hour or busy and you are in the middle lane when the car dies. Then you have to hope the large vehicle behind you sees it in time to brake without smashing into you. Not exactly a worry free experience then huh?
billryan
billryan
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February 4th, 2020 at 3:14:44 PM permalink
Quote: DRich

I have been on hundreds of flights without ever having to make an unscheduled fuel stop. Some of my companies small jets will stop to refuel when flying accros country but those are scheduled stops.

I wonder how many commercial flights make an unscheduled fuel stop each day? There are around 87,000 commercial lights per day in the U.S., how many per day do you think make an unscheduled fuel stop? I have no idea, but I would guess less than 1 per day.

I used to fly a lot between Las Vegas and Corpus Christi, some days we could make it without refueling but others days we would schedule a stop in central Texas to refuel. It just depended on the winds and the altitude that we were cleared at.



On really windy days, jet blue and delta flights from Vegas that are full often stop at Salt Lake.
billryan
billryan
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February 4th, 2020 at 3:21:14 PM permalink
Hopefully they no longer do it but twenty years ago, United used 757s on some trans Atlantic flights and they'd often have to refuel in Gander if the headwinds were strong.

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