MrV
MrV
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December 6th, 2015 at 8:27:55 AM permalink
I've no concerns about someone saying they felt lazy and unmotivated for a short period of time, I suspect we've all felt that way.

The thing that sent off the alarm bell was the idea that he stayed in bed all day because of his mental state.

Maybe some more info would help: what did you do in bed all day?

Read?

Watch TV?

That's OK.

But it would be of concern if all day long you lay in bed essentially paralyzed by a feeling of hopelessness or despair and did nothing other than dwell on persoanal issues and obsess over same.
"What, me worry?"
Wizardofnothing
Wizardofnothing
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December 6th, 2015 at 8:53:07 AM permalink
Thanks for the concern, I was in bed all day reading and watching tv, just unmotivated and worn out , been traveling non stop for 18 months and think I was just the weather change and the what are my next goals. Thouggts
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beachbumbabs
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December 6th, 2015 at 9:15:15 AM permalink
Some things that might help:

1. Go to a tanning bed place (seriously) and get 5-10 min/day for a week. There's a physiological lack-of-sunshine that affects people with SAD. If this works, you might get one of those sunlamps available to counteract this winter-bleah problem and use it whenever you're in front of your computer (for example).

2. Go read Time magazine, or some other newsthing that writes from a perspective of a few days to a month. There's always one or more stories that makes you count your blessings. For example; you're not a Syrian refugee who got blown out of their home and livelihood by civil war and death threats. In the abstract, we're sort of numb to this. If you put yourself in the place of that dad whose toddler son drowned in the surf when he was trying to rescue his family as the boat overturned for even 1 minute, it can put you back on track with your "better than that" life.

3. Similar to 2. above, go volunteer a day at a homeless shelter, veteran's help center, or disabled center. It will both put your life into better perspective and give you a lift that you've done something for someone else. This works wonders if you've gotten too introspective and self-centered.

4. Or: Donate some money (something significant) to your favorite charity, even if you've never done that before. If you like animals more than most people, there are several good ones. If you think veterans are under-served, pick them. Whatever stirs your sense of outrage, do something positive, because when it comes to this stuff, every dollar makes a difference. You can do it anonymously so you don't get spammed for your trouble.

5. Go get some exercise. This releases endorphins that raise your spirits, and is something "good" for you. Do 10 laps around a mall or the perimeter of a casino floor if the weather's too harsh, but outside is usually better.

6. Pick up something you used to enjoy but no longer have time to do. Play the guitar or piano. Do crossword puzzles or get absorbed in a good video game.

You might try each of these in turn. Without being obsessively introspective, lightly monitor your mood, and see what gives you a lift. If anything does, schedule time to do it into your routine so you can be pro-active about not getting into the same hole again.

It could be a chemical imbalance, but if this isn't a pattern for you, and you have no family history of it, I don't think you need to go first to anti-depressant drugs. However, if you drink, I would suggest you go without for a week or two, since alcohol is a depressant, and see if that makes a difference in your mood.

All JMHO, since you asked.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
Face
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Face
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December 6th, 2015 at 9:43:40 AM permalink
Quote: Wizardofnothing

I literally have not gotten out of bed all day....



One man's trash...

I assume you're a man. I wish I knew your location. This is totally common for many, many people, especially men, especially this time of year.

If you want a diagnosis, you've come to the wrong spot. Depression (and that's what this is, even if it's acute) has a bazillion causes. Without going too in depth (because there's a word limit on posts, and this topic could go into tens of thousands), here's some things to consider...

Winter. Between DST and axis tilt, you're getting less sunlight, both time wise and strength wise. The sun is important for mental health. Some can find relief with slight but moderately regular tanning, or travel to the south. Nov - Feb is my own "homicidal season", so I plan my vacations for Jan-Feb. As soon as I set foot in St Thomas, all of the grey vanishes instantly and permanently.

Stress. This could be a million things. Your health, finances, work load (or lack thereof), family, kids, In the News, politics, whatever. If something bothers you long enough, you fall in the hole. Being happy takes work, and every day you don't work, you sink deeper. Fix what you can, while you can, or else one day you go to bed and you won't make it back out.

Nutrition. Life is balance, and when it goes, you go. If you're craving something, listen. Cravings are often a natural reaction to a lack of something. This, too, can be work. I hate water, but I force it in me every day. Salads, veggies, fruits,... I just want a steak and a pizza (often together), but I know that's not sustainable if I want to avoid the red mist.

Sleep. The surest way to the rubber room is to jack up your sleep. You need to be up in the sun, down at night, and productive in between.

I prefer to avoid medicating my way to happiness. Weed and beer might work in a pinch, and the Zolofts of the world will keep you from caring about anything, but they all have moderate to severe side effects. YOU need to find what works for you, and that means work. I know it's hard to work when you can't even get out of bed, and as this will be a trial and error process, I know how impossible accepting failure can be at this point in time. But it must be done. Physical activity is my panacea. I can be in the deepest, dankest holes in my head, but hitting the ice makes everything go away. Hiking my hometown canyons to exhaustion makes me smile again. Doing physical work helps me out. It might for you, or it might not be an option. I don't know you, and I suspect, you might not even know this part of you. But you have to know it to fix it, so you have to try.

And know that you're not alone. You're not broken (at least, not in a way that's different than every single other person), and, perhaps most importantly, it is not permanent. The sun will shine on you again for no reason at all. It's just, in the meantime, you have to make it shine. Do the work and you will find the way.
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AB21
AB21
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December 6th, 2015 at 2:01:02 PM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

Some things that might help:

1. Go to a tanning bed place (seriously) and get 5-10 min/day for a week. There's a physiological lack-of-sunshine that affects people with SAD. If this works, you might get one of those sunlamps available to counteract this winter-bleah problem and use it whenever you're in front of your computer (for example).



I wouldn't recommend this. Regular use of a tanning bed can increase your chance of getting skin cancer - especially if you are fair skinned. The increased risk for short term use is probably minimal, but why take the chance?
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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December 6th, 2015 at 2:21:40 PM permalink
Quote: AB21

I wouldn't recommend this. Regular use of a tanning bed can increase your chance of getting skin cancer - especially if you are fair skinned. The increased risk for short term use is probably minimal, but why take the chance?



Yeah, I'm not suggesting he become a regular (re: the recommendation to get the special lamp they sell that's not so destructive). For a week, he can take an intense (but safe) course and see if it makes a difference. Since he doesn't know the source of his issue, it seems like an inexpensive way to see if that's the reason.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
EvenBob
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December 6th, 2015 at 2:33:06 PM permalink
Quote: Wizardofnothing

Anyone ever suddenly become depressed out of no where- like can't get out of bed depressed for zero reason?



Only when I run out of vodka. So I keep
plenty around to keep me cheerful.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
GWAE
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December 6th, 2015 at 2:51:45 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Only when I run out of vodka. So I keep
plenty around to keep me cheerful.



EB I thought about you this morning when I made an omlette and realized I was out of onions.
Expect the worst and you will never be disappointed. I AM NOT PART OF GWAE RADIO SHOW
djatc
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December 6th, 2015 at 2:54:07 PM permalink
I usually binge watch football on sunday or some other tv show
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Esposito
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December 6th, 2015 at 6:21:46 PM permalink
Sometimes I feel that while no anxiety catch me at all. Don't go for office or outside to gossip with other friends. Just sleep on the bed for a whole day.
Ready to learn from others.

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