pokerface
pokerface
Joined: May 9, 2010
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May 23rd, 2010 at 3:37:39 PM permalink
Quote: RiverRock

Another story is similar except a female was wearing white pants that day and it was near the end of the month. I don't have to say more. She was one of our VIP players and refused to leave.


VIP simply means she already lost a lot of money and quite possibly an addicted gambler.
Sure she refused to leave a "hot" game.
winning streaks come and go, losing streak never ends.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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May 23rd, 2010 at 4:21:26 PM permalink
Quote: Paigowdan

"Run to the CAGE, asshole! ... before you kiss it goodbye!"

I think I told this story already, but....

I saw a guy hit BIG at Roulette in Mohegan Sun. He had a bunch of chips on a number, as well as several on each of the splits and corners for that number. Plus a few spread out. His big number hit.

That one spin won him over $22K.

I told him to ask them to bring four $5K chips to stick in his pocket. It took forever to pay him off, I ended up walking away before it was done.

I go back around an hour later, and the table is empty, but has the same dealer.

I asked the dealer:
"That guy never bothered to ask for the $5K chips, right?"
"Right."
"HE gave it back, didn't he?"
"All of it."

I just shook my head and kept walking....
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁 Note that the same could be said for Religion. I.E. Religion is nothing more than organized superstition. 🤗
Asswhoopermcdaddy
Asswhoopermcdaddy
Joined: Nov 30, 2009
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May 24th, 2010 at 4:51:16 PM permalink
Gambling is a horrible addiction. It's part of the frailty of the human condition. Every loss generates more hurt, pain, suffering, and emotion than every gain. That's a scientific fact as well as every subsequent win generates less and less satisfaction if you keep your bets flat. This post reminds me of the one of our fellow members of this forum who reached out for some advice. Sometimes people need a big loss to put things in perspective and seek help. Sometimes, that loss never equates to hitting rock bottom and they perpetuate a cycle of falling.

I wonder if we can make a fair distinction between addicts and gamblers? If I would dare say, many of us here enjoy gambling a little or as I call it engaging in "recreational activities of statistical chance". But to be an addict implies something much more, a persistent obsessive behavior in which all logic and reason fail you. A recurring high in which judgement is impaired.

I've come to believe that many gamblers have rules in which they try their best to follow (we're human, keep in mind). But an addict lacks all rules, all sense of direction, and perspective. A gambler might only play the 8th position at a craps table while an addict will play any position. A gambler might have a hard call and walk away at a predetermined time while an addict loses all sense of time.

Is there a true cure for such addiction other than to quit entirely? I would suppose not. I remember a colleague who was addicted to liquor and one drink would lead to several bottles. The only way for him to be good to himself and his family was to quit entirely. A painful process with some setbacks but ultimately promising results.
odiousgambit
odiousgambit
Joined: Nov 9, 2009
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May 24th, 2010 at 6:06:26 PM permalink
in some ways a gambling addiction might be harder to quit, as I have seen alcoholics quit when they realized they were going to die [and seen others keep drinking because they didnt care if they died]. But a gambling addict isnt challenged in this way.
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
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May 24th, 2010 at 6:44:42 PM permalink
I can only relate it to my brother; if he'd bet until he won the entire casino, he would have bet the entire casino to win another casino. If he'd won the world, he would have gone double or nothing. It wasn't the winnings he was after, it was the thrill of the bet. It couldn't be satisfied, it demanded to be renewed, again and again.

I have to stop here and say something. I miss Jim terribly. He died last October, heart attack at 53. He packed one hell of a lot of living into his first 30 or so years, then sobered up in about 1988, then spent the last 21 years of his life as a drug and alcohol counselor in prisons. We raised some serious hell together in the '70s and early '80s. I straightened up before he did, but I was also never as bad. He basically killed himself with hard living, then lived another 21 years after that on sheer personality.

Anyhow, that came out of nowhere. He helped a lot of people after he straightened himself out. He did it by every single day refusing to engage in destructive behavior. I know that he wouldn't even take prescription drugs; one of the reasons he kept putting off bypass surgery was he didn't want to take the painkillers.
NO KILL I
odiousgambit
odiousgambit
Joined: Nov 9, 2009
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May 26th, 2010 at 10:59:59 AM permalink
Quote: Mosca

I miss Jim terribly. He died last October, heart attack at 53.



Sorry for your loss. That was 21 years that he elected to have, heeding the warnings [sorry if presumption wrong]. Some just go on and die young. I swear I had a friend who wanted to commit suicide by driving, and did so barely in his twenties.
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder

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