Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
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August 22nd, 2010 at 6:12:55 AM permalink
Of course that's just a yellow path and green buildings, not the yellow brick road and Emerald City.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
dwheatley
dwheatley
Joined: Nov 16, 2009
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August 22nd, 2010 at 2:17:36 PM permalink
I wouldn't worry too much about the yellow road and green buildings. Wizard of Oz is about to enter public domain. 1939 + 75 = 2014.
Wisdom is the quality that keeps you out of situations where you would otherwise need it
Garnabby
Garnabby
Joined: Aug 14, 2010
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August 23rd, 2010 at 5:56:07 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Don't mess with me when it comes to Sanford and Son. Fred was from L.A., I think El Segundo to be specific.



Well, the way i recall it... the modern term "watts line", meaning an 800-number, derived from their location in L.A.

"Sanford and Son stars Redd Foxx as Fred G. Sanford, a 65-year-old junk dealer living at 9114 S. Central Ave. in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California; and Demond Wilson as his 30-year-old son, Lamont Sanford."

"Similarly, Fred was initially depicted as a man who, if not always ethically or culturally sensitive, had the wisdom of experience. As the show went on, Fred was seen getting into increasingly ludicrous situations, such as faking a British accent to get a job as a waiter; convincing a white couple that an earthquake was really the "Watts Line" of the then-non-existent L.A. subway (a wordplay on the then-common phrase "WATS line"); taking over a play featuring George Foreman; or sneaking into a celebrity's private area, such as Lena Horne's dressing room or Frank Sinatra's hotel room. Many of these situations invariably revolved around Fred trying to make a quick buck." ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanford_and_Son )

"Besides mentioning Watts, Redd Foxx often referred to El Segundo on the 1972 hit TV show Sanford and Son. In one episode, he refers to his Ripple wine as coming from "the vineyards of El Segundo." He was also "thrown off a bridge by a bigot in El Segundo." In another episode - titled "The Reverend Sanford," he says he was "having a religious picture painted on his ceiling next week, like Michelangelo. It's going to be Moses partin' an oil spill in El Segundo." Finally, in another episode, when Lamont says the cologne he is wearing is called "A Day In Paris," Fred says: "Smells more like "A Night In El Segundo."" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Segundo,_California )
Why bet at all, if you can be sure? Anyway, what constitutes a "good bet"? - The best slots-game in town; a sucker's edge; or some gray-area blackjack-stunts? (P.S. God doesn't even have to exist to be God.)
Doc
Doc
Joined: Feb 27, 2010
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August 23rd, 2010 at 7:27:22 PM permalink
Quote: Garnabby

Well, the way i recall it... the modern term "watts line", meaning an 800-number, derived from their location in L.A.

It seems the rest of your post contradicts your recollection. The 800-number term is WATS, which stands for Wide Area Telephone Service and was in use long before Sanford and Son. Your quote makes reference to a non-existent Watts subway line claimed by Fred.

Edit: Brain glitch. WATS and 800 numbers are quite different. WATS is for outgoing calls at fixed/low rates, similar to what most of us get on mobile phones these days. The 800 numbers (sometimes called "inward WATS" are for incoming calls without charge to the caller. Obviously, I am not in the telecommunications field.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
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August 23rd, 2010 at 7:35:20 PM permalink
I stand corrected on the specific location of where Fred lived, but I KNEW El Segundo had something to do with the show. I remember that line about the vineyards of El Segundo. If anyone cares, El Segundo is home to LAX, and aside from some airport hotels, is rather seedy.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
teddys
teddys
Joined: Nov 14, 2009
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August 23rd, 2010 at 7:41:48 PM permalink
Maybe Fred once left his wallet in El Segundo?
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
Garnabby
Garnabby
Joined: Aug 14, 2010
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August 23rd, 2010 at 7:57:28 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

It seems the rest of your post contradicts your recollection. The 800-number term is WATS, which stands for Wide Area Telephone Service and was in use long before Sanford and Son. Your quote makes reference to a non-existent Watts subway line claimed by Fred.



Yes, i was hoping someone would "clear that up". Thank you.

Quote: Doc

Edit: Brain glitch. WATS and 800 numbers are quite different. WATS is for outgoing calls at fixed/low rates, similar to what most of us get on mobile phones these days. The 800 numbers (sometimes called "inward WATS" are for incoming calls without charge to the caller. Obviously, I am not in the telecommunications field.



"WATTS TELEPHONE LINE - Similar to a 1-800 number, whereby a business pays a flat rate per month for using this telephone service plan. The farmworkers union used the WATTS line as a cost-saving measure to call boycott staff throughout the U.S. The procedure established was for the city boycott office to call person-to-person to the national boycott director in Delano (or, later, at La Paz). The person-to-person call would be refused, and the national Boycott office would call back on the WATTS line." ( http://www.farmworkermovement.org/essays/glossary.shtml )


P.S. I wonder from where the WATTS (neighborhood) derives?
Why bet at all, if you can be sure? Anyway, what constitutes a "good bet"? - The best slots-game in town; a sucker's edge; or some gray-area blackjack-stunts? (P.S. God doesn't even have to exist to be God.)
Doc
Doc
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August 23rd, 2010 at 9:14:12 PM permalink
I wonder whether there is actually a meaning for "WATTS telephone line" (with the extra "T" added to "WATS".) I have never heard that term before. Maybe the farm workers movement just screwed that up.

Wikipedia claims that the city of Watts was named for the Watts railroad station but gives no info on why the station was named that.
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
Joined: Jan 12, 2010
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September 23rd, 2010 at 8:08:08 AM permalink
deleted
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
thlf
thlf
Joined: Feb 24, 2010
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September 23rd, 2010 at 8:18:49 AM permalink
http://www.thewizofodds.com/


Check this site out. I know it's not the same but I think too close for comfort. I was going to ask you about this when I met with you Wiz but I forgot.

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