Casino Chip of the Day

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May 5th, 2012 at 8:25:34 AM permalink
Doc
Member since: Feb 27, 2010
Threads: 27
Posts: 5031
Quote: Johnzimbo
I have the same chip as ....

Are you sure it's the same? I mentioned that there are five almost identical designs of the Fitzgeralds chips. Post your $1 chip if it might be one of the other designs. At least confirm that yours is the SCV like mine (if you know the difference between that and the LCV) and that the city/state is printed in black like mine instead of gray. I'll let it slide if you don't have a UV light to check for the hidden images. :-)

By the way, that was a nice story about keno at Fitzgeralds.
May 5th, 2012 at 8:36:59 AM permalink
rdw4potus
Member since: Mar 11, 2010
Threads: 78
Posts: 5758
Here's my Fitzgeralds chip. It features something I've never seen before - wear such that the tophats are just missing on the upper right side of the picture. The chip is in relatively good shape, but the edges are rounded and even the face is worn.

"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett
May 5th, 2012 at 9:18:37 AM permalink
Johnzimbo
Member since: Sep 29, 2010
Threads: 4
Posts: 344
Quote: Doc
Are you sure it's the same? I mentioned that there are five almost identical designs of the Fitzgeralds chips. Post your $1 chip if it might be one of the other designs. At least confirm that yours is the SCV like mine (if you know the difference between that and the LCV) and that the city/state is printed in black like mine instead of gray. I'll let it slide if you don't have a UV light to check for the hidden images. :-)

By the way, that was a nice story about keno at Fitzgeralds.


Here it is...maybe you can tell if it is different

May 5th, 2012 at 9:55:54 AM permalink
Doc
Member since: Feb 27, 2010
Threads: 27
Posts: 5031
Quote: Johnzimbo
Here it is...maybe you can tell if it is different

Well, that is the same Short Cane Version (SCV) as mine, but the "Las Vegas, Nevada" looks to me to be the gray print rather than the black print that is on mine. Yes, the difference is quite subtle. That's why I suggested I don't see how Fitzgeralds changing to this "different" chip could provide much identity or security benefits to the casino. You'd really have to look closely to notice the difference between your chip and mine. MOGH does not indicate there are any hidden images to be revealed by UV light for either of the designs with the gray print. Since I don't have one, I can't check for myself.
May 5th, 2012 at 5:58:02 PM permalink
Face
Administrator
Member since: Dec 27, 2010
Threads: 46
Posts: 2525
Quote: Doc
That is five different designs that cannot be quickly distinguished by players or dealers unless they squint at the color of ultra-fine print and the LCV vs. SCV patterns and also have a UV light handy. I suspect that these chips are/were frequently mixed in use at the tables. All I can guess is this was some kind of inside joke between the security crew and the folks at Paulson. Any thoughts on this, Face? What does it take to amuse a security man?


Well, I can't say for certain. Our casino has been open less than a decade, so issues of different eras of cheques isn't something we've ever had to deal with.

My educated guess on why there are so many intermixed is that they simply received new cheques at various points in their history (for wear and tear, maybe new security features), and didn't feel it necessary to retire the old ones. Security isn't a huge concern with the "whites", and since they're nearly identical to the old ones, it wasn't worth the hassle or cost of replacement to get rid of them. Think old vs. new American currency; sure, the Treasurer's name is different, but otherwise they're nearly identical and, well, no one really cares about the $1 ;)

Personally, I wouldn't care about 5 different designs since, as you said, the patterns on these different $1's aren't easily distinguishable from each other. In fact, I think that's probably the reason that they have been allowed to be intermixed. If all the $1's look like each other, it's not really an issue. If only when they're noticeably different, or look like another denom, that we have a problem.

Random anecdote - I am horrifically colorblind; in my test to become a corrections officer, I was told "the only people who see color worse than you are people who cannot see, period". Yet, I've have no problem on the job, nor with my own bankroll when I've gamed. I think it's just a repeated exposure thing, you get used to the certain traits of the different denoms and can identify them at a glance, even if it's a glance from 25' away through a terrible monitor/camera combo from the late 80's (or through eyes that can't perceive color). Keep in mind, we don't see cheques as you do. We can't move them to more or less light, tilt them out of glare, or bring them right up to our eye, so such minor details are of no significance to us. Fine print, UV, that's more for Cage or Inspectors, those who can get up close and inspect for counterfeit.

I imagine our glasses-wearing friends can understand what I mean. Without glasses and blurry eyed, you can still identify a bill placed in front of you, even if you can't see the number, face, or read the fine print. You can probably confirm that the $100 and $20 are represented in the picture below. It's the same for us and cheques. In fact, the pic below is a very accurate representation of what we see during reviews (and to be completely honest, I wish some of our reviews were this clear ;)). Different colors of "ultra fine print" is something I doubt anyone (other than avid cheque fans) would notice =)

[img =http://ak2.picdn.net/shutterstock/videos/338914/preview/stock-footage-united-states-currency-blurred-to-sharp-spinning.jpg]
The opinions of this moderator are for entertainment purposes only.
May 5th, 2012 at 7:48:02 PM permalink
Doc
Member since: Feb 27, 2010
Threads: 27
Posts: 5031
Thanks for the perspective, Face. I guess I was thinking of situations more appropriate to higher-valued chips. Consider the case of the idiot-motorcyclist-son-of-a-judge who robbed the Bellagio -- suppose the big chips had not had RFID tags. The casino could cancel/withdraw that series of the chips and refuse to accept them any more. But then if all of their replacement chips look so nearly the same (like with the Fitzgeralds $1 chips), it takes a 30-second inspection of each chip to tell whether someone slipped in some of the old/withdrawn chips.

Now I know you wouldn't want to have that happen with $500 chips, so the replacements probably look a lot different. Maybe it isn't the security department that would worry about such things. I just thought that for the $1 chips, probably nobody cares, and it could be a little joke to have different series that are almost indistinguishable.
May 6th, 2012 at 6:48:46 AM permalink
Doc
Member since: Feb 27, 2010
Threads: 27
Posts: 5031
State: Nevada
City: Las Vegas
Casino: Flamingo


The Flamingo casino opened in 1946 as the third casino resort on the Las Vegas strip and is the oldest still operating, though none of the original structure remains. I once heard it said that you know a strip casino is old if there is a major avenue named for it. If I were to try to present the history of the Flamingo in this thread, I would probably ramble on for pages, even if I stuck to the best-known versions of the real history and avoided the dramatizations of Bugsy Siegel's role as presented in the various books and films.

In an abbreviated form, my understanding is that Siegel did not come up with the idea for the casino and did not start the construction. Those roles fell to a Billy Wilkerson, who encountered financial difficulties. Siegel did convince organized crime associates to invest in his idea to purchase, redesign, and complete the hotel-casino.

Unfortunately, as I understand it, Siegel knew nothing about design, construction, or casinos. He may have been played as a patsy all along, with someone else stealing from him throughout the construction phase, leading him into delays and a major cost overrun, and getting him into very hot water with the investors who thought Siegel was skimming.

When the casino hotel finally had its grand opening in 1946, it flopped because the place wasn't finished. It shut down for a couple of months in early 1947 to let construction progress a little further before re-opening, still incomplete but in a state that it could generate revenue and a little profit. Apparently not enough to please everyone, because Siegel was murdered in Los Angeles a couple of months later. Popular history has it that the murder took place in LA to keep the bad publicity of mob violence away from the investments in Las Vegas.

The various owners of the Flamingo over the years have traded on the Bugsy Siegel history and legends. Today there is a Bugsy's Bar inside the place and a memorial plaque, basically a tribute to Siegel, on the Flaming grounds near the wedding chapel.

A couple of days ago, after Nareed had told us a little about "Rancho", "Fiesta", "Fandango", "Eldorado", and "El Cortez", I suggested that she could be our Spanish resource for this thread and tell us about the word "flamingo". Unfortunately, she said she expected to be too busy to post today. I think she is on the plane to Vegas as I type this. I'm certainly not going to leap into the breach to explain the Spanish, because I might even confuse "flamingo" with "flamenco."

According to the always-reliable Wikipedia, the casino's original name of Flamingo Hotel and Casino was selected by Siegel because (1) Flamingo was the nickname he had given his skinny-legged girlfriend and/or (2) he considered the flamingos at the Hialeah Park racetrack to be symbols of good luck. The name as well as ownership changed several times. Some of the name variations over the years included The Fabulous Flamingo, Flamingo Hilton, and Flamingo Las Vegas. Just to confuse matters, from 1959 or '60 until 1979, there was also a nearby casino hotel called the Flamingo Capri, which is now known as the Imperial Palace.

Ownership, after the days of heavy involvement of organized crime, passed to Kirk Kerkorian (who has long been a big cheese at MGM, once being majority owner), then to Hilton Corporation, Park Place Entertainment, Caesars Entertainment (original edition), Harrah's Entertainment, and now Caesars Entertainment (2nd edition).

The Flaming chip shown below was manufactured by Bud Jones and includes a clear BJ logo on the center inlay. The MOGH catalog says this chip was issued in 2005, and the mold is the same design as the Crystal Bay and Eldorado Reno chips shown previously.

I'm sure there must be several people here who have other Flamingo chips to share with us, but does anyone have chips saying Flamingo Hilton or other older names for the casino? Let's leave any Flamingo Capri chips to post with those from the Imperial Palace and leave the Margaritaville chips until the thread gets to "M".



Edit 5/22/12: Ayecarumba provided me the link to his Flamingo chip, so I'm adding it here in an appropriate position. It is a Paulson SCV hat and cane mold that MOGH says was issued in 2011. There is also a 2011 issue that looks just like this but has the LCV mold on the opposite side, so I'm not sure which chip Ayecarumba has.

May 6th, 2012 at 7:55:21 AM permalink
Johnzimbo
Member since: Sep 29, 2010
Threads: 4
Posts: 344
My chip says Flamingo Hilton and I grabbed it in the early 80's I believe though it may have been much later. I wasn't good at documenting dates or how I snagged my chips :(

May 6th, 2012 at 9:18:32 AM permalink
rdw4potus
Member since: Mar 11, 2010
Threads: 78
Posts: 5758
Here's my Flamingo chip. It's made by Paulson, which makes me wonder if we have three different manufacturers in chips so far (mine, Doc's, Johnzimbo's).

"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett
May 6th, 2012 at 9:21:10 AM permalink
Doc
Member since: Feb 27, 2010
Threads: 27
Posts: 5031
Thanks for sharing your Flamingo Hilton chip, Johnzimbo. That one looks as if it is in remarkably good condition.

The MOGH catalog shows six different chip designs issued in the 1980s and 1990s that look almost like that. Five of the six have different UV images hidden on them. Other subtle differences are how dark/light the rainbow is printed and how dark/light the "Las Vegas, NV" is printed. The oldest issued chip does not have a UV image and does not include the "NV" after the city name. Very similar designs.



Edit: I should have noted that the UV images all show a top hat and cane, indicating that the chips are from Paulson, even though there is no logo that can be seen without the UV.

 

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